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By MICHAEL OLESKER | September 15, 2002
THE LITTLE GUY sticks his head outside the principal's office door and glances down the hall, as though looking out for the cops. Joanne Blackmore spots him. The little guy's a first-grader here at Wellwood International Elementary School, on Smith Avenue in northwest Baltimore County. Blackmore's the vice principal. For the little guy, this could be considered worse than any cops. "Yes?" Blackmore says. The little guy glances up and up. Blackmore, towering over him, does not cash in on her size advantage.
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NEWS
July 17, 2013
The opinions expressed by letter writer Craig Piette ("Time to cut bait on Smith Island," July 11) reflect a lack of knowledge of the subject matter. It also wasn't clear whether he visited Ewell or Rhodes Point during his time on Smith Island or only Tylerton. Smith Island is made up of all three communities, with Ewell having twice the full-time population of either Tylerton or Rhodes Point. There is more to Smith Island than any one community represents. Several new businesses were started in Ewell over the past three years.
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NEWS
By HOWARD LIBIT and HOWARD LIBIT,SUN STAFF | June 11, 1999
They don't need to stand on their tiptoes anymore to peek through the windows in the door to Room 8. Nor do they have to use two hands to turn its knob.More important for these first-graders at Reisterstown's Cedarmere Elementary School, five- and six-letter words are becoming kind of easy. Short picture books are turning boring because there aren't enough words. And writing even unfamiliar words isn't so hard because spelling patterns are starting to make sense.The reading code has been cracked.
NEWS
March 10, 2013
In regard to the 7-year-old boy suspended from second grade for nibbling a breakfast pastry into the shape of a gun ("The smoking pastry," March 7), we must immediately ban pastries from the schools. They cause diabetes and obesity, and that kills 300,000 Americans a year. Ban the pastry if it would save the life if even one child! Deaths from objects nibbled into gun shapes? Zero. Theodore Houk, Lutherville
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,Sun Staff | February 7, 2000
They don't go into Room 8 much anymore. Once in a while, a few stick their heads in for quick hellos and hugs. But for most, Room 8 -- and first grade -- are memories of long ago. Those were the days of learning how to tell "b's" from "d's" and "p's" from "q's" -- of learning how to join letters to make words and words to make sentences. First grade was the year to begin cracking the code, to begin learning how to read. Last year's children of Room 8 at Cedarmere Elementary School in Reisterstown are now second-graders.
NEWS
December 2, 2001
The Carroll County Volunteer Firemen's Association will present awards for its annual fire prevention poster contest at 2 p.m. today at the Mount Airy Volunteer Fire Company's open house. The contest is sponsored by the Prevention and Life Safety Committee for children in grades one through five. The grand prize winner in each grade will receive a certificate. Other winners will receive ribbons. Schools that had entries will receive a participant ribbons and certificates. Winners are: Faith Christian School: First grade, Chloe Pavuk, first place and grand prize winner.
NEWS
March 15, 1998
"Making sure that every child reads at grade level by the end of second grade has been our highest priority. If we don't accomplish that, everything else will be in trouble."Baltimore County School Superintendent Anthony G. Marchione in a recent interview with The Sun.Pub Date: 3/15/98
NEWS
March 26, 1997
Hampstead Elementary School recently held its 1997 photography contest.First-place winners were:Kindergarten to second grade: Erik Adami, landscape and life study; Samantha Pietryak, still life.Grades three through five: Justin Walsh, landscape; Jason Parkins, life study; Jimmy Donaldson, still life.They will advance to the county contest.Second-place finishers were:Kindergarten to second grade: Thomas Connors, landscape; Maria Donaldson, life study; Ilana Kelsey, still life.Grades three through five: Justin Walsh and Mark Applefeld, (tie)
NEWS
October 29, 2000
The Carroll County Volunteer Firemen's Association held its fifth annual Carroll County Prevention & Life Safety Poster Contest awards program Oct. 21 for elementary-school children. At a reception for children and their parents, the committee, led by Debbie Gartrell-Kemp, presented awards to children who entered a poster. Winners honored were: Grand prize: first grade, Falesha Lewis from Charles Carroll Elementary; second grade, Christina Staines from Mount Airy Elementary; third grade, Shannon McHale from Sandymount Elementary; fourth grade, Nicholas Vidi from Winfield Elementary; fifth grade, Chris Schultz from Sandymount.
NEWS
March 10, 2013
In regard to the 7-year-old boy suspended from second grade for nibbling a breakfast pastry into the shape of a gun ("The smoking pastry," March 7), we must immediately ban pastries from the schools. They cause diabetes and obesity, and that kills 300,000 Americans a year. Ban the pastry if it would save the life if even one child! Deaths from objects nibbled into gun shapes? Zero. Theodore Houk, Lutherville
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | February 25, 2011
The second-grade students at Johnnycake Elementary in Catonsville have discovered that without George Washington Carver, there might not be peanut butter, and if the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. had not spoken out, schools might not be integrated. In their Black History Month research, they found ordinary men and women, who struggled and won Nobel prizes, Olympic medals and a firm place in the annals of American history. The 7- and 8-year-olds turned their efforts into a museum for their schoolmates Thursday.
NEWS
By SARA NEUFELD and SARA NEUFELD,SUN REPORTER | June 13, 2006
First- and second-graders in Baltimore public schools showed gains on a national test administered by the school system this spring, officials announced yesterday. In reading, first-graders scored on average in the 46th percentile of the Stanford 10 standardized test, meaning they outscored 46 percent of children in a national sample. That's up from the 41st percentile last year. Second-graders scored in the 43rd percentile, up from the 41st last year. Math scores were higher still. First-graders scored in the 53rd percentile, up from the 46th.
NEWS
By KAREN NITKIN and KAREN NITKIN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 11, 2006
Esly Mendez has written a book called Jasmin's Party. It's about a girl who throws a party for her friends but has a problem when one of the friends eats the food. In the end, the girls pop popcorn and cook some more food, and the party is saved. Esly said she was inspired to write the story by her sister, who recently had a party to celebrate turning 1. Esly, 8, read the book to parents and fellow second-graders on Thursday as part of an author's tea at Cradlerock School. After she read each page of the hardbound book, she showed the pictures to the audience.
NEWS
May 31, 2006
Mike Vetri, Francis Scott Key SPORT TRACK AND FIELD BOYS STATS -- The senior took second at the county championship meet in both the 110 hurdles (15.6 seconds) and 300 hurdles (42.61). He then took second in both events at the Class 2A West regional meet. SIDELINES -- Vetri will attend the Air Force Academy, where he plans to get experience flying fighter jets. His dream is to pilot spacecraft for NASA - a career path he chose after watching Apollo 13 in second grade. He hopes to run track at Air Force and also make the football team as a walk-on.
NEWS
By CASSANDRA A. FORTIN and CASSANDRA A. FORTIN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 14, 2006
Emma Reed began writing short stories in the second grade, but her stories weren't the typical few sentences that teachers usually see from their second-graders. Emma wrote books. Last year, she wrote and illustrated a 20-page published book called Alby the Amazing Pig, a story about a pig who goes to the city in search of a veterinarian to help an injured blue jay. One section reads: "Alby, with Jo on his back, walked slowly into the city. Hammers, saws, drills, hoses! Everything around them was alive.
NEWS
By EDWARD LEE and EDWARD LEE,SUN REPORTER | January 25, 2006
It has the makings of an urban legend. A second-grader is pulled out of her class and asked to race a gym class of about 20 fifth-graders for a little more than 400 meters. The second-grader obliges and wins by about 10 meters. A myth, right? Not when that second-grader is a girl named Elan Hilaire. "It was just a race for everyone to see who was the fastest," recalled Hilaire, now a sophomore at Park. "Since it was a lot of us at the start, I just took off really fast, and that was it. I just kept running."
FEATURES
March 15, 1998
The Sun has assembled a panel of professionals to address your concerns about reading and your child. If you have a question, or a suggestion, please write to: Ask the Experts, Reading by 9, Features Department, The Sun, 501 N. Calvert St., Baltimore, Md. 21278Larry Silver is a clinical professor of psychiatry at Georgetown University Medical School and is in private practice in Rockville. He responds to this question frequently asked of him.Question: My son is in second grade and still not reading well.
NEWS
By ANDREA F. SIEGEL and ANDREA F. SIEGEL,SUN REPORTER | October 9, 2005
Some youngsters need an extra boost to master academic basics that serve as the foundation for other learning. So Hilltop Elementary School teacher Edith McDougald invites their parents to take them to her home for tutoring and "of course, a little snack," or she drops by their homes or meets them at the library for extra help. There's no charge. McDougald said her incentive is to help the children grow and learn. "I want them to see that they are special, and they can do it, too," said McDougald, a second-grade teacher.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | April 21, 2005
Plays about dinner parties appear to be in vogue in this area nowadays. Olney Theatre Center is serving up a gourmet meal nightly in the apocalyptic Omnium Gatherum, and on a smaller scale, the Vagabond Players has set the table for Neil Simon's 2000 comedy The Dinner Party. The setting - a private dining room in a chic Paris restaurant - is something of an oddity for Simon, and the Vagabonds' elegantly detailed set, designed and built by Tony Colavito, is a piece de resistance. But the play itself is less satisfying.
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