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By HARTFORD COURANT | June 5, 1997
What happens when a player asks to be traded by a team that hasn't been able to trade him? That's Mariano Duncan's situation. He lost his second base job with the New York Yankees and has been in principal owner George Steinbrenner's doghouse since spring training.Nothing happens, unless the Yankees find a taker for Duncan, a major part of the Yankees' World Series champion team in 1996. The best thing Duncan, 34, did as a second baseman last year was hit .340. Never a Gold Glove candidate, he has fielded adequately, but his hitting made up for his defense.
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By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | August 17, 2014
CLEVELAND -- Televisions in the Orioles' clubhouse have shown the Little League World Series recently, and the major leaguers have been paying attention. But no Orioles player may be more interested than 22-year-old second baseman Jonathan Schoop. This month marks the 10th anniversary of when Schoop's Pabao Little League club from his native Curacao beat Thousand Oaks, Calif., 5-2, to become the first Caribbean team to win the Little League World Series. Schoop picked up the save in that title game.
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By Joe Strauss and Joe Strauss,SUN STAFF | April 7, 1997
ARLINGTON, Texas -- The wait for Roberto Alomar finally ends today when the All-Star second baseman returns from a five-game suspension levied for last September's spitting incident involving AL umpire John Hirschbeck.Alomar was to join the club last night in Kansas City and, according to manager Davey Johnson, should be in this afternoon's lineup against the Royals, probably as the No. 2 hitter. Since spending Opening Day with the Orioles, Alomar has been in Sarasota, Fla., shedding rust caused by a off-season ankle injury.
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By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | July 31, 2014
There's roughly 80 minutes left before the nonwaiver trade deadline expires, and the Orioles have not yet made a move. I don't think that's necessarily indicative of what will occur in the next hour-plus. I talked to one guy today who joked that Orioles executive vice president Dan Duquette should be wearing a watch that keeps track of seconds -- because that's how he often plays these deadlines. The trade for Bud Norris last year on this day went down at the last minute, so it would be no shock if an 11th-hour deal like that happens again.
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July 15, 2007
Offense -- He has below- average power and was a below-average hitter, which he isn't now. He's not a fast guy, but he has usable speed. He is an eighth- or ninth-place hitter but could bat second if a club has a need there. Defense -- He is adequate at second base. His hands are fine, but he doesn't have the arm for shortstop. He doesn't have the arm strength to make that throw from the hole. Role -- If he keeps hitting, he'll have a spot. I think he is a [Cubs manager Lou] Piniella- type guy. He is the type of manager that wants the gamers with good attitude and good makeup over raw talent guys.
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By Jeff Zrebiec and Jeff Zrebiec,Sun reporter | August 8, 2008
ANAHEIM, Calif. - Brian Roberts and Erik Bedard share the same agent, so the Orioles' second baseman is well aware of the nightmarish season his former teammate has experienced after he was traded to the Seattle Mariners. Roberts also remains close friends with his old double-play partner Miguel Tejada, who was traded in December to the Houston Astros, a team with a record similar to the Orioles'. Neither Tejada nor Bedard wanted to be part of the Orioles' rebuilding process, so club president Andy MacPhail traded both.
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By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,Sun reporter | March 26, 2008
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. -- Orioles second baseman Brian Roberts was scratched from yesterday's lineup before batting practice, but not because he had been traded. That theory was put to rest almost immediately. Roberts has been dealing with some tightness in his lower back for about a week. Team orthopedist Dr. John Wilckens examined him yesterday and recommended that he take a few days off, so Scott Moore made his first exhibition start at second base and batted leadoff. "It's one of those things that you play with all the time," Roberts said.
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By Jeff Zrebiec and Jeff Zrebiec,Sun reporter | March 8, 2008
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. -- The Orioles and Chicago Cubs have not had any recent discussions about All-Star second baseman Brian Roberts, pushing the potential deal toward Opening Day or beyond. Despite engaging in trade talks for more than three months, the teams still have not agreed to a package that both find suitable. According to two baseball sources, the Cubs have offered infielder Ronny Cedeno, pitching prospects Sean Gallagher and Donald Veal, and one other player for Roberts, but the Orioles are holding out for a better offer.
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By Kent Baker | August 12, 1991
Bill Ripken will go to Frederick tonight to begin a rehabilitation assignment with the Class A Keys."The plan is to send him there to DH and then possibly to Hagerstown to play second base the following night," said Baltimore Orioles manager John Oates. "Glenn [Davis] will be DHing in Hagerstown."Ripken is on the disabled list with strained muscles in the rib-cage area. The Orioles thought he might be ready to play by now, but the problem has come and gone, then returned again."He agrees that it will be a whole lot better go out and test this thing," said Oates.
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By JEFF ZREBIEC and JEFF ZREBIEC,SUN REPORTER | February 25, 2006
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. -- Orioles second baseman Brian Roberts took another step forward yesterday, participating in a soft-toss drill for the first time since his season-ending elbow injury last September. Roberts went to the cage and looked sharp in taking about 50 swings with spring instructor Julio Vinas under-handing him the ball from about 25 feet away. "It's the first time I've done soft-toss in six months," Roberts said. "It starts off slow, and as you get into it, it loosens up and starts to feel a lot better.
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By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | May 26, 2014
MILWAUKEE - After Jonathan Schoop hit a fly ball to left field to end the top of the 10th inning of the Orioles' 7-6 victory Monday, he came back into the dugout and was angry. Orioles shortstop J.J. Hardy, part amused and part flabbergasted by what the 22-year-old rookie was thinking, asked Schoop what was going on. “He goes, 'I just missed that last one.' ” Hardy said Schoop told him. “I'm like, 'What are you talking about? You had a great game. You just relax.' ” One of the reasons the Orioles like the young second baseman is his competitiveness.
NEWS
May 6, 2014
In a recent sports report you listed the second basemen of each franchise who hit more than 100 home runs ("Ranking the American League East: Who has the best second baseman?," March 13). Yet you stated the St. Louis Cardinals had none. Really? Has no one on your staff ever heard of Rogers Hornsby, who had over 190 for the Cardinals and was the first major league player to reach 100 and 200 in his career? Come on, just open a baseball encyclopedia. Keith P. DiNardo - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
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By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | December 18, 2013
The Orioles have drawn plenty of criticism this offseason for staying idle while division rivals participated in a heavy hot-stove spending spree, but their patience has landed something positive in closer Grant Balfour. Balfour and the Orioles agreed on a two-year, $15 million deal Tuesday, pending a physical, that will fill the void left when the club traded closer Jim Johnson earlier this month. Earlier this offseason, the Orioles allowed themselves to get priced out on free agents like Nate McLouth and Scott Feldman, who ended up signing lucrative deals elsewhere.
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By Eduardo A. Encina and Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | December 17, 2013
The longest tenured Oriole left for pinstripes. Veteran second baseman Brian Roberts, who has played his entire 13-year career with the Orioles and has been the face of the franchise through many of those seasons, has agreed to a one-year deal worth $2 million plus incentives with the rival New York Yankees, according to an industry source. The 36-year-old Roberts, who completed a four-year, $40-million deal this past season, didn't return multiple calls Tuesday, but in September, he told The Baltimore Sun that he wanted to end his career with the Orioles.
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By Eduardo A. Encina, The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2013
Orioles second baseman Brian Roberts concedes that he's had passing thoughts over the past several weeks about whether these might be his final days in the only major league uniform he's ever worn. "Oh, sure, I think everybody thinks about their future at some point," Roberts said. "I've tried not to really dwell on it, but there are times when you definitely want to know what's next for you, when there's no assurance of anything you don't really know. You just kind of walk by faith.
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The Baltimore Sun | September 21, 2013
When the Orioles game began today at 1:10 p.m., less than 12 hours after Friday night's marathon game ended, catcher Matt Wieters and second baseman Brian Roberts were not in the starting lineup. Wieters, 27, caught all 18 innings Friday night and had not had a day off since Sept. 13. He went 2-for-7 with a walk against the Rays Friday. Steve Clevenger (Mount St. Joseph's) started in Wieters' place. Roberts, 35, played all 18 innings, going 2-for-6 with a walk. Alexi Casilla started for Roberts.
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By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | September 21, 2003
Second baseman Mike Fontenot and pitcher John Maine headed the list of player development award winners announced by the Orioles before last night's game against the Toronto Blue Jays. Fontenot, the 19th overall selection in the 2001 draft out of Louisiana State, was named the Brooks Robinson Minor League Player of the Year after batting .325 with 12 homers and 66 RBIs in 126 games at Double-A Bowie. The improvement was dramatic, considering he hit .264 at Single-A Frederick last season.
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By Daniel Gallen and The Baltimore Sun | August 2, 2013
Despite his status as a special assistant to the division-rival Toronto Blue Jays and only a short - yet decorated - tenure in Baltimore, Roberto Alomar called his induction into the Orioles Hall of Fame on Friday “a dream come true.” “I feel honored. It's an honor as a ballplayer,” Alomar said. “I never expected this phone call from the Orioles. I only played here for three years and it caught me by surprise. But to be selected by such a great, elite group of players, it is an honor.
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