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NEWS
November 7, 2011
It's almost too obvious and (alas) it may be pure wishful thinking, but say these words out loud: "Baltimore Orioles general manager Cal Ripken Jr. " Rolls easily off the tongue, doesn't it? Joe Pachino, Baltimore
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NEWS
By Jules Witcover | December 2, 2013
General Douglas MacArthur, in being relieved of his command by President Harry Truman in the Korean War, famously declared that "old soldiers never die, they just fade away. " The last part of that has most often applied as well to defeated presidential nominees. F. Scott Fitzgerald somewhat similarly noted in "The Last Tycoon" that "there are no second acts in American lives" -- an observation that also could be said in politics of most also-rans in presidential sweepstakes.
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NEWS
By Jules Witcover | December 2, 2013
General Douglas MacArthur, in being relieved of his command by President Harry Truman in the Korean War, famously declared that "old soldiers never die, they just fade away. " The last part of that has most often applied as well to defeated presidential nominees. F. Scott Fitzgerald somewhat similarly noted in "The Last Tycoon" that "there are no second acts in American lives" -- an observation that also could be said in politics of most also-rans in presidential sweepstakes.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2012
The Sweetlife Food and Music Festival's second stage, a.k.a. The Treehouse, will feature Delta Spirit, Twin Shadow, Zola Jesus, the Knocks, RAC, U.S. Royalty, Yuna, Haim, LP, Cut Copy's Ben Browning and Bluebrain, it was announced Wednesday afternoon. This is the first year the Sweetlife Festival - which takes place April 28 at Merriweather Post Pavilion in Columbia - has expanded its acts to two stages. The artists for the Treehouse were chosen as "emerging acts, many coming off the SxSW buzz," according to a press release.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | October 17, 2002
BOSTON -- Did you notice an echo in the admiration? How many people described the 2002 winner of the Nobel Peace Prize as a better ex-president than president? How many praised Jimmy Carter as a man who grew not in office, but out of it? One commentator noted wryly that the White House was just his launching pad to greatness. A historian said that Jimmy Carter had finally lost the tag of presidential "loser" by becoming a Nobel "winner." It was as if succeeding in peace was only a consolation for failing at politics.
FEATURES
By J. L. Conklin and J. L. Conklin,Contributing Writer | December 2, 1993
The Moscow Ballet opened its six-day run of "The Nutcracker" Tuesday evening at the Morris A. Mechanic Theatre to an audience primed to see a truly Russian performance. While the audience was not disappointed with the flourish of talent (both Russian and local), the production values were less than glorious and at several points were almost ludicrous.Although newly choreographed by one-time Bolshoi star Stanislav Vlasov, this production felt well-worn. Mr. Vlasov's inspiration was the 1934 Kirov's "Nutcracker," and the costumes and wigs looked as if they had been left in a closet since that production.
FEATURES
By MARY CAROLE MCCAULEY and MARY CAROLE MCCAULEY,SUN REPORTER | April 13, 2006
Early in the second act of Little Women, the heroine gets bad news. The audience begins to weep helplessly and doesn't stop for a solid half-hour. The Hippodrome Theatre begins to fill with sea-water. After 10 minutes, you could pilot a small boat down the aisles. After 20, you could drop a fishing line into the waves and catch a late dinner. Heck, even the fish are crying. Little Women 8 p.m. Tuesdays-Saturdays; 2 p.m. Saturdays; 1 p.m., 6:30 p.m. Sundays. Through April 23. Hippodrome Theatre, 12 N. Eutaw St. $26-$71.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | April 15, 1991
The masterpieces of early opera are essentially sung plays that must be brought to life by words and the accouterments of staging rather than by beautiful singing.Saturday's cast for Francesco Cavalli's "Ormindo" (1644) at the Peabody Conservatory of Music was not generally outstanding in vocal terms but the performance was an unqualified success.In less than discerning hands, this opera -- which recounts the adventures of Ormindo, the Prince of Tunis, who loves Erisbe, the wife of the elderly Ariadeno, King of Fez -- can seem pretty light stuff.
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone and Lou Cedrone,Evening Sun Staff | November 29, 1991
ATHOL Fugard's ''My Children! My Africa!'' doesn't really take form until the second act, but when it does, is very moving drama.The first act is a bit windy. It is in no hurry to go anywhere, but the production, at Center Stage, always looks good, is beautifully acted, and the second act includes scenic touches that are almost spectacular.''My Children! My Africa!'' has only three characters. One is a teacher at a school in South Africa. The others are students, a young black man and a white girl.
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone and Lou Cedrone,Evening Sun Staff | June 11, 1991
You don't want to judge ''The Petition'' by its first act. All sorts of questions arise during the opening act, questions that need to be answered.The questions, it turns out, are answered during the second act, to the relative satisfaction of the viewer, and by the time the play is ended, we are pleased to have been in the company of an interesting couple.Of course, the couple in "The Petition" are a little exasperating, but then they are British aristocracy, and these people have always marched to their own classical music, if the plays and movies that have been written about them are in any way accurate.
NEWS
November 7, 2011
It's almost too obvious and (alas) it may be pure wishful thinking, but say these words out loud: "Baltimore Orioles general manager Cal Ripken Jr. " Rolls easily off the tongue, doesn't it? Joe Pachino, Baltimore
SPORTS
By Conor O'Neill, The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2010
There was plenty of chatter at Loyola's Reitz Arena last Thursday before a Baltimore Summer League game. Players tied their shoes, scarfed down pre-game snacks and talked about NBA free agency before games began on the third night of play in the NCAA-sanctioned basketball league for local college players. The distractions, however, did not bother Towson forward Braxton Dupree, who shot jumpers by himself away from the off-court diversions. The Calvert Hall graduate made a habit of showing up about a half hour before each of his summer league contests.
NEWS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,sandra.mckee@baltsun.com | November 27, 2009
The pictures come clearly into the mind of Bob Sabelhaus Sr., as he is driving to New York for Thanksgiving and talking on his cell phone about his son Bobby, who in 1995 was the nation's top-rated quarterback prospect during his senior year at McDonogh. The pictures are like flashcards: Bobby, The Sun's Offensive Player of the Year at McDonogh ... His son struggling in Florida coach Steve Spurrier's sink-or-swim system, so unlike McDonogh, where coaches were nurturing ... The diagnosis that his son had bipolar II disorder, clinical depression ... and, finally, the phone call from San Jose State, where Bobby had been trying to re-establish his football career.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,tim.smith@baltsun.com | June 11, 2009
As the 19th century gave way to the 20th, issues that had long been unspoken, long kept under wraps, began to surface. One, in particular, jumped out to startle people right out of their puritanical/Victorian comfort zones - sex. The eagerness to talk openly about sex seems to have been particularly pronounced in Germany, where the 1890s saw one of the world's first gay-rights organizations and where a play by Frank Wedekind called Spring Awakening explicitly...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,mary.mccauley@baltsun.com | February 19, 2009
Mark Twain's sadness and worries about money are all right there - hidden under the cross-dressing plot that puts a cigar-chomping gent in hoop skirts and hair bows, beneath the satirical swipes at the French, the art world and Limburger cheese. Is He Dead?, a recently discovered 1898 comedy by the great humorist and adapted by David Ives, has all the sparkle and brilliance of a shooting star. But it leaves behind a trail of dust, stones and space debris. In the farce, currently receiving a solid production at Olney Theatre Center, Twain cheekily placed a beloved, recent painter, Jean Francois Millet, in stage center.
NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | October 19, 2007
BOSTON -- Until now, I believed that the smallest unit of time was between the moment the traffic light turned green and the car behind you honked. I was wrong. The shortest unit is actually between the moment you win the Nobel Peace Prize and someone asks if you're running for president. This is the story of Al Gore. It's wrapped succinctly in the Time magazine headline: "Gore Wins the Nobel. But Will He Run?" The best answer came from Rep. Rahm Emanuel: "Why would he run for president when he can be a demigod?"
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | September 27, 1991
From the moment you hear Vanessa Stewart's big, rich, emotion-packed voice in Arena Player's production of the revue, "Blues in the Night," you want to hear her cut loose in a rip-roaring solo. And it's worth the wait when she launches into Bessie Smith's "Dirty No-Gooder's Blues" in the second act.Lanky Ms. Stewart has a way of communing with the audience; she shares a song as if she's sharing a secret, leaning into the music and letting the choreography communicate almost as much as her expansive voice.
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone | June 10, 1991
Recommended reading:Mickey Rooney tells all in his book ''Life is Too Short,'' and a lot you don't care to know. For a man who turned to God rather late in life, the much-married (eight wives, nine children) Rooney says some ignoble things about people like Norma Shearer, Betty Grable and Marilyn Monroe. Not that we haven't heard most of this, but Rooney makes it seem even seamier.He does tell one interesting story. He says he was asked not to act as a presenter at an Academy Awards show because he had been married ''too many times.
NEWS
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | June 17, 2007
Documentarian returns in a 'reality'-wary age Once again, Terry Wrong has spent three months living, breathing and chronicling the inner life of Johns Hopkins Hospital for an ABC broadcast documentary. If there is one thing he wants viewers to get from his film, it's "a shock of recognition that this is real, this is true, this is life and death." Facing a viewership jaded by so-called "reality TV," the award-winning broadcast journalist says, "People aren't being paid to come on and die before the cameras in this production -- these are not wannabe actors.
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