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By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | September 19, 2012
A few years ago, Tyson Ritter, the lean lead singer of the All-American Rejects, was a walking rock 'n' roll cliche. After experiencing "life-changing" success thanks to "Gives You Hell" — his band's 2008 single that sold more than 4 million copies and catapulted the quartet into the Top 40 stratosphere — Ritter moved to Los Angeles and quickly fell into a life focused on beautiful women and all-night partying. The Oklahoma native, now 28, says his quarter-life crisis had its "dark" moments, but he was able to come out the other side because of the Rejects' long-standing writing ritual: They find seclusion.
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NEWS
Editorial from The Aegis | January 30, 2014
Strange though it may seem to say out loud, just about everyone in Harford County is the beneficiary of a residential developer. Be it Howard Park, one of the county's oldest neighborhoods, or Bulle Rock in Havre de Grace, one of its newest, the places where most houses are - and where most people live - are there because of residential land developers. In Harford County, as is the case in many suburban communities, the dynamic is such that people have been attracted because of the relative seclusion, which then attracts another wave of potential buyers, which results in more development, making the place less secluded and generally irritating the people who came for the initial level of seclusion.
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NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | February 25, 2005
State and local officials are reviewing the seclusion policy at Baltimore's Juvenile Justice Center after three youths were required to stay in their rooms for three consecutive days and possibly longer after trying to escape from the downtown detention facility. Under state law, detention officials have the right to place incarcerated youths in seclusion to keep them from escaping or hurting themselves or others, but there are strict time limits. There is some question whether supervisors are adhering to those limits, state and local officials said yesterday.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | September 19, 2012
A few years ago, Tyson Ritter, the lean lead singer of the All-American Rejects, was a walking rock 'n' roll cliche. After experiencing "life-changing" success thanks to "Gives You Hell" — his band's 2008 single that sold more than 4 million copies and catapulted the quartet into the Top 40 stratosphere — Ritter moved to Los Angeles and quickly fell into a life focused on beautiful women and all-night partying. The Oklahoma native, now 28, says his quarter-life crisis had its "dark" moments, but he was able to come out the other side because of the Rejects' long-standing writing ritual: They find seclusion.
NEWS
November 19, 1991
Gustav Husak, 78, who as Communist Party leader of Czechoslovakia held it in the grip of pro-Moscow orthodoxy from Alexander Dubcek's failed "Prague Spring" of 1968 until Eastern Europe revolted against communism, died of heart, circulatory and respiratory failure yesterday in Bratislava, the capital of the Slovak republic. His political career mirrored his country's turbulent history since World War II. He died one day after the second anniversary of a student protest that sparked the "velvet revolution" and forced him to resign as president Dec. 10, 1989.
NEWS
By Gina Davis and Gina Davis,SUN STAFF | November 11, 2004
Administrators and teachers will follow new procedures for dealing with unruly students, according to a revised policy adopted yesterday by the Carroll County school board. Called the "exclusion, seclusion and physical restraint" policy, it is intended as a last resort for school employees who find themselves dealing with an especially disruptive child, said Cynthia Little, director of student services. The policy dictates an approach that progresses from less restrictive to more extreme measures that may be taken to address misbehavior in the classroom, she said.
NEWS
August 5, 2005
IT'S A GOOD thing the Justice Department is investigating the troubled detention wing at the Baltimore City Juvenile Justice Center. Just Wednesday, a detainee was hospitalized after another youth hit him with a chair, causing severe injuries to his face, eye and neck. The children at the city's detention center are not yet guilty under the law - they are waiting to appear in court to answer charges. Some are there because their parents haven't yet been found to pick them up. They are not there to be brutalized, or to be taught further criminal behavior, though that is what continues to happen, according to state monitors' reports, defense attorneys and advocates.
NEWS
Editorial from The Aegis | January 30, 2014
Strange though it may seem to say out loud, just about everyone in Harford County is the beneficiary of a residential developer. Be it Howard Park, one of the county's oldest neighborhoods, or Bulle Rock in Havre de Grace, one of its newest, the places where most houses are - and where most people live - are there because of residential land developers. In Harford County, as is the case in many suburban communities, the dynamic is such that people have been attracted because of the relative seclusion, which then attracts another wave of potential buyers, which results in more development, making the place less secluded and generally irritating the people who came for the initial level of seclusion.
SPORTS
By Bill Burton | May 14, 1991
STEVENSVILLE -- Four rockfish too small to keep and few boats around to complicate trolling patterns and spook the fish. That sums up yesterday's trophy rockfish effort on the Chesapeake.Saturday's opener brought hopeful rockfish buffs out of th woodwork, the crowds thinned the following day as many stayed ashore to observe Mother's Day, and yesterday those of us aboard Bernie Ruck's Marlen V had the Chesapeake from the Bay Bridge to Bloody Point pretty much to ourselves.Fishing the same area Saturday, I saw about 1,000 boats yesterday there were perhaps 50. No longer was there a fleet massive enough to cause concern that rock would be spooked by all the traffic.
SPORTS
By John F. Steadman and John F. Steadman,Evening Sun Staff | January 28, 1991
TAMPA, Fla. -- He walked alone. And never has a more forlorn figure been seen on a football field. Scott Norwood, in a dramatic conclusion, was the difference between winning and losing the Super Bowl.Not in the 25-year Super series had it come down to the final play. In Super Bowl V, when the Baltimore Colts won the coveted prize, Jim O'Brien broke a tie with a 32-yard field goal with four seconds remaining.A miss would have meant overtime. But in Super Bowl XXV, it was a win or lose at that instant for Norwood and the Buffalo Bills.
TRAVEL
By Kathryn Masterson and Kathryn Masterson,Chicago Tribune | August 12, 2007
MONHEGAN ISLAND, MAINE / / Just 10 miles off the coast, this island midway between Portland and Acadia National Park feels a world away from the beach and sailing towns that attract droves of tourists to the state each summer. There are no ice cream stands, T-shirt shops or lobster pounds offering early-bird specials. Just a handful of stores to buy coffee, wine or cheese, and more than 450 acres of undisturbed nature and people in search of a place that's peaceful and quiet. There is no traffic on this 1.7-mile-long by 0.7-mile-wide island, nor are there streetlights illuminating the night.
NEWS
August 5, 2005
IT'S A GOOD thing the Justice Department is investigating the troubled detention wing at the Baltimore City Juvenile Justice Center. Just Wednesday, a detainee was hospitalized after another youth hit him with a chair, causing severe injuries to his face, eye and neck. The children at the city's detention center are not yet guilty under the law - they are waiting to appear in court to answer charges. Some are there because their parents haven't yet been found to pick them up. They are not there to be brutalized, or to be taught further criminal behavior, though that is what continues to happen, according to state monitors' reports, defense attorneys and advocates.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | February 25, 2005
State and local officials are reviewing the seclusion policy at Baltimore's Juvenile Justice Center after three youths were required to stay in their rooms for three consecutive days and possibly longer after trying to escape from the downtown detention facility. Under state law, detention officials have the right to place incarcerated youths in seclusion to keep them from escaping or hurting themselves or others, but there are strict time limits. There is some question whether supervisors are adhering to those limits, state and local officials said yesterday.
NEWS
By Gina Davis and Gina Davis,SUN STAFF | November 11, 2004
Administrators and teachers will follow new procedures for dealing with unruly students, according to a revised policy adopted yesterday by the Carroll County school board. Called the "exclusion, seclusion and physical restraint" policy, it is intended as a last resort for school employees who find themselves dealing with an especially disruptive child, said Cynthia Little, director of student services. The policy dictates an approach that progresses from less restrictive to more extreme measures that may be taken to address misbehavior in the classroom, she said.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN STAFF | September 21, 2004
WASHINGTON - Bill Burkett knows what it's like to get wooed by a national news network. And now he knows what it's like to get dumped by one, too. The retired Texas National Guard officer who provided CBS with documents purporting to show that President Bush received preferential treatment during his Vietnam-era National Guard service was singled out by the network yesterday for deceiving its staff about the origins of those documents. Now Burkett, 55, finds himself behind the locked gate of his ranch just east of Abilene, trying to avoid those who would call this "Burkettgate."
BUSINESS
By Sara K. Clarke and Sara K. Clarke,SUN STAFF | June 27, 2004
The old Tappan stove in Kirk and Jane Osborn's 1931 Tudor home is the showpiece of the kitchen, but it is troubled by controls that malfunction and an oven that leaks heat. The original white-trimmed brick look in Mike Vogel's home was lost during the 1970s when olive green adornments were hip. The wood cattle fence in Darla Byerly's yard has become a haven for wood bees; she plans to put in a more traditional wrought-iron fence. These homeowners in Mayfield are in luck -- in January, the community was designated a historic district.
BUSINESS
By Ellen James Martin and Ellen James Martin,Staff Writer | January 23, 1994
The sight of a red fox caught Susan Patry by surprise as she walked her dog in Original Northwood the other night. "I was just flabbergasted," she said.While one could hardly call the Northeast Baltimore neighborhood a nature preserve, there is a secluded feel. Both the layout of the neighborhood and its towering trees seem to give it shelter from the stress of the city."It's a nice little residential oasis in the middle of a lot of hustle and bustle," says Frank Gorman, a 51-year-old lawyer who has lived there for two decades.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 26, 2000
BELGRADE, Yugoslavia - A characteristically defiant Slobodan Milosevic staged his political comeback yesterday, winning re-election as leader of his Socialist Party of Serbia and denouncing as a coup the popular uprising that swept him from power last month. In his first public appearance since he accepted his election defeat and resigned as the Yugoslav president on Oct. 6, a day after the uprising, Milosevic gave an aggressive opening speech to the Socialist Party congress. "Everybody in this hall knows what kind of violence and lawlessness has taken place since the coup on Oct. 5," he said.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 25, 2004
ROME - Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi addressed a cheering, flag-waving crowd at a lavishly choreographed celebration yesterday for the 10th anniversary of Forza Italia, the political party he sired. "I'm here! I'm here!" the prime minister told the throng of supporters who packed a Fascist-era assembly hall here. Those simple words had particular relevance and resonance because for much of the previous month, Berlusconi, 67, was nowhere to be seen, at least by anyone outside his inner circle.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN STAFF | August 21, 2002
GARRETT PARK - It's a century-old town that residents wish time would forget. Only one two-lane road runs in and out of tiny Garrett Park because the residents want it that way. There are no townhouses, the result of a public fight against them. And no home postal delivery. Residents pick up their mail daily at the post office because that's how they like it. All this despite its perch in the midst of Montgomery County's booming suburbs, not far from the Capital Beltway and bustling Rockville Pike and the nearest Bloomingdale's, which can be reached without going through a traffic light.
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