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NEWS
October 4, 2013
I used to be of the mind-set that secessionists were wild-eyed, "rugged individualism" folks who were rife with ideas that went against the grain of everything American. Now I find these same people are very intriguing. Secessionism is no longer a feared concept, what with the train wreck that has occurred down the Baltimore-Washington Parkway. Just a few years before I entered grade school, Hawaii was named our 50th state. It was at the time a perfectly rounded number for what I thought as a child was an idyllic time for our nation.
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By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | July 30, 2014
First, Anne Arundel County Council candidate Michael Peroutka talks about the need to destroy the "current regime," secede and establish a government based on the Bible.  Then he asks the crowd to stand for the National Anthem. But Peroutka does not sing "The Star-Spangled Banner. " He plucks the guitar and sings:  "Oh I wish I was in the land of cotton Old times there are not forgotten Look away, look away, look away Dixie Land" Is that.... Yup, Peroutka's National Anthem is "Dixie.
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NEWS
July 6, 2013
Arthur Hirsch 's recent article about the Battle of Gettysburg reveals a disturbing ignorance of the political dynamics that brought this nation to a war that 150 years later remains the most cataclysmic event in our history ("A defining day relived," July 2). It accepts the shallow but unchallenged premise that the Civil War occurred because slavery was practiced in the South, and that righteous resolve to abolish the institution left the U.S. with no option other than a resort to arms.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | July 30, 2014
Anne Arundel County Council candidate Michael Peroutka refused Wednesday to disavow an organization that encourages secession of the South, and denounced political and community leaders who have questioned his ties to the group. The Republican candidate for an Arundel district including Severna Park, Broadneck and Arnold has seen his views called into question regarding his membership in the League of the South, formed in 1994 in Tuscaloosa, Ala., to "organize Southern people so that they might effectively pursue independence and self-government," according to the group's website.
NEWS
March 17, 2010
Frederick County commissioners have rejected a proposal to consider seceding from Maryland. The panel voted 4-1 Tuesday against Republican Commissioner Lennie Thompson's resolution. Board President Jan Gardner called it outlandish and Commissioner Kai Hagen labeled it a public relations gimmick. But all the commissioners sympathized with Thompson's frustration at the increasing cost of state government. Thompson said a proposal recently floated by state lawmakers to shift some teacher pension costs to the counties illustrates the General Assembly's financial irresponsibility.
NEWS
February 21, 1998
WHAT IF the federal government, instead of defending Fort Sumter in 1861, had taken the Confederacy to court for a ruling on secession? Could the Union have been saved and the Civil War averted? Probably not.Canada's federal government of Prime Minister Jean Chretien has asked its Supreme Court to define the right, terms and conditions for Quebec to secede. The object is not to ward off a war, which no Canadian expects, but to seize the initiative from the separatists in defining the terms of debate and decision.
NEWS
July 14, 2013
Reporter Arthur Hirsch 's article on the recent article on the re-enactment at the 150 t h anniversary of the Battle of Gettysburg included a familiar Civil War anecdote about a Confederate soldier who had been captured at Fort Donelson ("A defining day relived," July 2). Responding to a question from his Union captors, he famously answered, "We're fighting because y'all are down here. " As a source of empirical evidence, this tale invites profoundly misleading interpretation: There is a duty to disclose the message actually intended by a Rebel who spoke his answer fully seven months before Lincoln issued the preliminary Emancipation Proclamation.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | March 5, 1991
MOSCOW -- The heavy pro-independence balloting in Estonia and Latvia on Sunday, in which "yes" votes outnumbered "no" votes 3-to-1, nonetheless would fall short of the margin required to secede from the U.S.S.R. under a law President Mikhail S. Gorbachev insists he will enforce.The law on secession, rushed through the Supreme Soviet last spring after Lithuania declared its independence, requires a pro-independence vote from two-thirds of all eligible voters in a republic to start a five-year secession process.
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,SUN STAFF | October 10, 2000
A band of angry residents is drafting a plan to draw new lines on the Maryland map. In Bowie, a city of 50,000, they are talking secession. Maybe leave Prince George's County and throw in their lot with neighboring Anne Arundel County. Maybe see if Bowie would be better off as a city unto itself. Maybe just demonstrate their unhappiness with the county government in Upper Marlboro. The latest move to break away might have been born amid dinner party chatter, and the odds against its success might be steep, but Bowie's rebels say they are pressing ahead with their threat.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 21, 1999
BANDA ACEH, Indonesia -- It has become a hauntingly familiar drama in Indonesia: families huddling on a wind-swept pier or in a crowded bus station, fleeing a home that has become too dangerous as old grievances give rise to explosive separatist passions.Last time it was East Timor, which voted for independence from Indonesia in August only to be plunged into bloodshed that an Australian-led international military force was sent in to quell.Now it is Aceh (pronounced ah-CHAY), a lush, devoutly Islamic province that lies on the extreme western edge of the Indonesian archipelago.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | May 17, 2014
One by one, the sacred cows hit the ground, adroitly tipped over by the best-selling author Steve Berry in his 13th historical novel, "The Lincoln Myth. " Berry, 59, is a Florida-based former attorney and county commissioner turned author whose previous 12 books have sold more than 17 million copies in 51 countries. The sales are a tribute to the author's skill at folding his research into little-known historical puzzles inside murder mysteries starring Cotton Malone, a retired U.S. Justice Department operative turned book-seller.
NEWS
October 4, 2013
I used to be of the mind-set that secessionists were wild-eyed, "rugged individualism" folks who were rife with ideas that went against the grain of everything American. Now I find these same people are very intriguing. Secessionism is no longer a feared concept, what with the train wreck that has occurred down the Baltimore-Washington Parkway. Just a few years before I entered grade school, Hawaii was named our 50th state. It was at the time a perfectly rounded number for what I thought as a child was an idyllic time for our nation.
NEWS
Thomas F. Schaller | September 18, 2013
Led by 49-year-old Carroll County resident Scott Strzelczyk, some residents from Maryland's five westernmost counties want to secede from the Old Line State and start their own, fifty-first state. Here's an alternative suggestion for the folks who've aligned themselves with the Western Maryland Initiative: Just move to West Virginia. It would be a simpler solution for everyone involved. For starters, Maryland-haters wouldn't need to orchestrate and execute secession; all they'd have to do is pack their stuff and drive no more than two hours to reach the state line.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | September 14, 2013
As we appear to be in a public-comment period regarding the proposed secession of five western counties from Maryland, I have a few additional observations to offer. But let me start with a summary of reasons for the separatist movement provided in dozens of emails from thoughtful people, many of them self-described libertarians, who support the establishment of the state of West Maryland: Residents of Carroll, Frederick, Washington, Allegany and Garrett counties are sick of the tyrannical rule of smug, liberal, socialist-leaning Democrats who live in central, urban-suburban Maryland, who support the welfare state, abortion and gun control, who raise taxes and fees or finagle federal funds for things that have nothing to do with Western Maryland while ignoring the needs of rural counties and running businesses out of the state.
NEWS
July 14, 2013
Reporter Arthur Hirsch 's article on the recent article on the re-enactment at the 150 t h anniversary of the Battle of Gettysburg included a familiar Civil War anecdote about a Confederate soldier who had been captured at Fort Donelson ("A defining day relived," July 2). Responding to a question from his Union captors, he famously answered, "We're fighting because y'all are down here. " As a source of empirical evidence, this tale invites profoundly misleading interpretation: There is a duty to disclose the message actually intended by a Rebel who spoke his answer fully seven months before Lincoln issued the preliminary Emancipation Proclamation.
NEWS
July 6, 2013
Arthur Hirsch 's recent article about the Battle of Gettysburg reveals a disturbing ignorance of the political dynamics that brought this nation to a war that 150 years later remains the most cataclysmic event in our history ("A defining day relived," July 2). It accepts the shallow but unchallenged premise that the Civil War occurred because slavery was practiced in the South, and that righteous resolve to abolish the institution left the U.S. with no option other than a resort to arms.
NEWS
By Mike Adams and Mike Adams,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 30, 2002
LOS ANGELES - Since the 1920s, the white, block letter Hollywood sign perched high in the hills above Hollywood Boulevard has served as a landmark for the movie industry, but recently it has become a pawn in a political battle that could tear this town apart. From one end of this sprawling 466-square-mile city to the other, secessionist fever is raging. Hollywood, the San Fernando Valley and the San Pedro harbor area want to break away and form independent municipalities. The state's Local Agency Formation Commission is analyzing the three secession plans and will decide whether they should appear on the November ballot.
NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | January 29, 1999
The revolution began with a poet, a barber and a motley crew of Eastport residents conspiring over a couple of beers in a secret meeting room on the second floor of the neighborhood watering hole.From that gathering at Marmaduke's stemmed a full-fledged Eastport revolt, a dramatic secession from Annapolis a year ago with cannons blasting, re-enactors charging and the friendly kidnapping of Mayor Dean L. Johnson -- leader of the stodgy "those people" from the other side of the Spa Creek Bridge.
NEWS
November 26, 2012
Over the years I have always found the letters to the editor to be at times informative and at times uninformed. It's a credit to The Sun's editors that often they allow both sides of an argument to be heard, and I believe most readers appreciate this effort. Personally I've always limited myself to reading the letters and either nodding my head in agreement or shaking my head in disbelief. However, this morning I found myself rereading two or three times a letter titled "Here's to the venomous secessionists" (Nov.
NEWS
By Jerome Miller | September 15, 2011
A plethora of contemporary political phenomena that may otherwise seem only bizarre — the various "pledges" not to compromise, the rejection of Social Security as a Ponzi scheme, the denial of evolution and climate change — begin to make sense once one recognizes that the historical analogy used to describe the movement responsible for them is inaccurate. Don't think 1774, 1776 and the Boston Tea Party. Think 1832, 1860 and nullification. Historically, nullification meant the sheer refusal of a state government to accept and abide by national legislation — specifically, in 1832, a tariff law with which South Carolina was unwilling to comply.
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