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Sebastian Junger

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By LAURA LIPPMAN and LAURA LIPPMAN,SUN STAFF | July 8, 1997
Sebastian Junger used to measure the cost of everything in tree work.As a tree trimmer -- a "high climber" in his parlance -- he could earn as much as $1,000 a day. Even the smallest job paid at least $200. So the health insurance policy he bought for himself, that was $900, or about a day of tree work. The deductible was $2,000 -- two days of tree work, and it proved to be a real bargain in 1991, the year he broke his right hand, then cut his calf while on the job.It's hard for a right-hander to get the back of the left leg. But Junger had reached behind himself one-handed and lost control of the chain saw, which was revving at 500 mph. (That's the kind of detail Junger loves, that 500 mph part.
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By Dave Rosenthal | May 25, 2012
The Memorial Day weekend is a great time to pick up a book about the men and women who have helped preserve America's freedoms, and have fought for our country around the world. There are lots of great books on the topic, and some more personal readings such as diaries. For me, the one that resonates is a yellowed map and journal called "The Thunderbolt across Europe," which describes the route my dad's division, the 83rd Infantry, took in World War II. It led from the beaches of Normandy, across France, into Belgium during the Battle of the Bulge, and into Germany.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Dave Rosenthal | May 25, 2012
The Memorial Day weekend is a great time to pick up a book about the men and women who have helped preserve America's freedoms, and have fought for our country around the world. There are lots of great books on the topic, and some more personal readings such as diaries. For me, the one that resonates is a yellowed map and journal called "The Thunderbolt across Europe," which describes the route my dad's division, the 83rd Infantry, took in World War II. It led from the beaches of Normandy, across France, into Belgium during the Battle of the Bulge, and into Germany.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLLOVE and MICHAEL OLLOVE,SUN BOOK EDITOR | May 7, 2006
A Death In Belmont Sebastian Junger W.W. Norton / 266 pages / $23.95 In 1962, when Sebastian Junger was just a year old, a swarthy and charming workman named Al was on a contracting crew building an addition to the Jungers' suburban Boston home. One morning, Junger's mother heard a noise in the basement and looked down the stairs to see the carpenter staring intensely back at her. Finally, Al, who must have entered through the bulkhead, told her that the washing machine seemed to be broken.
NEWS
By Jim Shea and Jim Shea,Hartford Courant | August 3, 1997
"The Perfect Storm," by Sebastian Junger. Norton. 227pages. $23.95.In October 1991, a powerful nor'easter out of Canada merged with, and was further energized by, the remnants of a hurricane out of the tropics. The marriage produced 100 mph winds and waves the height of a 10-story building.Unfortunately, the Andrea Gail, a swordfishing boat out of Gloucester, Mass., found itself on the short end of these long odds and was lost, along with all aboard, off the coast of Nova Scotia.While weather of such fury, and tragedy of such magnitude, are awash with story potential, it is the skillful telling of this tale that makes "The Perfect Storm" so compelling.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Candus Thomson and By Candus Thomson,Sun Staff | October 7, 2001
Fire, by Sebastian Junger. W.W. Norton. 224 pages. $24.95. Sebastian Junger has sophomore slump. How else can one explain, Fire, the mish-mash that is his second book? Four years ago, Junger took readers inside the world of commercial fishing and violent weather with The Perfect Storm, a highly acclaimed best-seller turned into a mediocre movie. The riveting tale moved smartly in 227 pages from the docks of Gloucester, Mass., to monster waves in the North Atlantic. Unfortunately for readers, Fire goes nowhere.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLLOVE and MICHAEL OLLOVE,SUN BOOK EDITOR | May 7, 2006
A Death In Belmont Sebastian Junger W.W. Norton / 266 pages / $23.95 In 1962, when Sebastian Junger was just a year old, a swarthy and charming workman named Al was on a contracting crew building an addition to the Jungers' suburban Boston home. One morning, Junger's mother heard a noise in the basement and looked down the stairs to see the carpenter staring intensely back at her. Finally, Al, who must have entered through the bulkhead, told her that the washing machine seemed to be broken.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,Sun Staff | December 19, 2004
What's not to like about a natural disaster story --unless, of course, it's happening to you. Bookstore shelves and discount bins sag under the weight of volumes about twisters, blizzards, avalanches and nor'easters. Walls of water 100 feet high. Winds that scour the landscape like steel wool. Life-sapping cold. They run the gamut from obscure events of yesteryear to stories "ripped from the pages of the newspaper," as one breathless blurb blurted. The disaster books being churned out by the dozens each year have rendered obsolete the placid travelogues of Lowell Thomas.
TOPIC
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | September 21, 2003
At the beginning of the 1977 miniseries Roots, the father of Kunta Kinte takes his baby out under the African sky and holds the infant high beneath a stunning canopy of stars. "Behold," he says, "the only thing greater than yourself." Last week, the terrible and wondrous swirl of clouds and winds and water called Hurricane Isabel forced us to behold the same thing - an acknowledgment of the superiority of nature. For almost all of human existence, this was a daily reality. It still is in many cultures.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Maria Blackburn and By Maria Blackburn,Sun Staff | July 21, 2002
The recent success of 1997's The Perfect Storm by Sebastian Junger (Harper, 301 pages, $6.99) and the National Book Award-winning In the Heart of the Sea by Nathaniel Philbrick (Penguin, 298 pages, $14), have unleashed a tsunami of books about perilous sea journeys. Considering that most people are currently either at the seashore or wished they were, there is more impetus to be interested in the sea right now. Not only that, but compared with the wealth of "important" novels in which people talk a great deal but don't actually do anything, these real-life sea stories are filled with drama because they are about people facing the ultimate human experiences -- life and death.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,Sun Staff | December 19, 2004
What's not to like about a natural disaster story --unless, of course, it's happening to you. Bookstore shelves and discount bins sag under the weight of volumes about twisters, blizzards, avalanches and nor'easters. Walls of water 100 feet high. Winds that scour the landscape like steel wool. Life-sapping cold. They run the gamut from obscure events of yesteryear to stories "ripped from the pages of the newspaper," as one breathless blurb blurted. The disaster books being churned out by the dozens each year have rendered obsolete the placid travelogues of Lowell Thomas.
TOPIC
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | September 21, 2003
At the beginning of the 1977 miniseries Roots, the father of Kunta Kinte takes his baby out under the African sky and holds the infant high beneath a stunning canopy of stars. "Behold," he says, "the only thing greater than yourself." Last week, the terrible and wondrous swirl of clouds and winds and water called Hurricane Isabel forced us to behold the same thing - an acknowledgment of the superiority of nature. For almost all of human existence, this was a daily reality. It still is in many cultures.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Maria Blackburn and By Maria Blackburn,Sun Staff | July 21, 2002
The recent success of 1997's The Perfect Storm by Sebastian Junger (Harper, 301 pages, $6.99) and the National Book Award-winning In the Heart of the Sea by Nathaniel Philbrick (Penguin, 298 pages, $14), have unleashed a tsunami of books about perilous sea journeys. Considering that most people are currently either at the seashore or wished they were, there is more impetus to be interested in the sea right now. Not only that, but compared with the wealth of "important" novels in which people talk a great deal but don't actually do anything, these real-life sea stories are filled with drama because they are about people facing the ultimate human experiences -- life and death.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Candus Thomson and By Candus Thomson,Sun Staff | October 7, 2001
Fire, by Sebastian Junger. W.W. Norton. 224 pages. $24.95. Sebastian Junger has sophomore slump. How else can one explain, Fire, the mish-mash that is his second book? Four years ago, Junger took readers inside the world of commercial fishing and violent weather with The Perfect Storm, a highly acclaimed best-seller turned into a mediocre movie. The riveting tale moved smartly in 227 pages from the docks of Gloucester, Mass., to monster waves in the North Atlantic. Unfortunately for readers, Fire goes nowhere.
NEWS
By Jim Shea and Jim Shea,Hartford Courant | August 3, 1997
"The Perfect Storm," by Sebastian Junger. Norton. 227pages. $23.95.In October 1991, a powerful nor'easter out of Canada merged with, and was further energized by, the remnants of a hurricane out of the tropics. The marriage produced 100 mph winds and waves the height of a 10-story building.Unfortunately, the Andrea Gail, a swordfishing boat out of Gloucester, Mass., found itself on the short end of these long odds and was lost, along with all aboard, off the coast of Nova Scotia.While weather of such fury, and tragedy of such magnitude, are awash with story potential, it is the skillful telling of this tale that makes "The Perfect Storm" so compelling.
FEATURES
By LAURA LIPPMAN and LAURA LIPPMAN,SUN STAFF | July 8, 1997
Sebastian Junger used to measure the cost of everything in tree work.As a tree trimmer -- a "high climber" in his parlance -- he could earn as much as $1,000 a day. Even the smallest job paid at least $200. So the health insurance policy he bought for himself, that was $900, or about a day of tree work. The deductible was $2,000 -- two days of tree work, and it proved to be a real bargain in 1991, the year he broke his right hand, then cut his calf while on the job.It's hard for a right-hander to get the back of the left leg. But Junger had reached behind himself one-handed and lost control of the chain saw, which was revving at 500 mph. (That's the kind of detail Junger loves, that 500 mph part.
FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal | April 15, 2012
With the 100th anniversary of the Titanic, there should be a renewed interest in "A Night to Remember," Baltimorean Walter Lord's recreation of the ship's sinking. It is a classic in the dramatiuc retelling of an historical event, and you could draw a straight line to more recent books such as Sebastian Junger's "A Perfect Storm" or Jon Krakauer's "Into Thin Air. " From the first pages, Lord evokes the gentility of the steamship era, and pulls readers into the unfolding disaster.
FEATURES
By Cynthia Dockrell and Cynthia Dockrell,BOSTON GLOBE | January 18, 1998
A good disaster story certainly has its appeal. Sitting in a comfy chair in a heated room in the depths of winter while reading of deaths on Everest or drownings far out to sea only adds to the experience: Our proximity to nature's wrath can make us sympathetic to its unwitting victims and critical of the egotists who put themselves in harm's way. Outside magazine has such a story in its January issue. Recounting the rescue last year of three sailors from the Southern Ocean, Craig Vetter spins a hair-raising yarn that bears a remarkable resemblance to Sebastian Junger's "The Perfect Storm" -- except Vetter's sailors were trying to win an around-the-world race, while Junger's fishermen died trying to make a living.
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