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By Sarah Schaffer and Sarah Schaffer,SUN STAFF | July 22, 2004
Heavy metal hasn't been hot since jean jackets were acid washed, but that hasn't kept ex-Skid Row vocalist Sebastian Bach from staying viable in modern pop culture. After the Canadian cut his celebrity teeth and then left the band in the mid-'90s, he embarked on a solo career that's included TV shows, film projects and even a few Broadway song-and-dance productions. On the heels of filming a new VH1 special and just prior to his Saturday gig at the Recher, the 36-year-old checked in with LIVE from his New Jersey pad to tell us how and why he's stayed close to the spotlight.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Sarah Schaffer and Sarah Schaffer,SUN STAFF | July 22, 2004
Heavy metal hasn't been hot since jean jackets were acid washed, but that hasn't kept ex-Skid Row vocalist Sebastian Bach from staying viable in modern pop culture. After the Canadian cut his celebrity teeth and then left the band in the mid-'90s, he embarked on a solo career that's included TV shows, film projects and even a few Broadway song-and-dance productions. On the heels of filming a new VH1 special and just prior to his Saturday gig at the Recher, the 36-year-old checked in with LIVE from his New Jersey pad to tell us how and why he's stayed close to the spotlight.
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FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | June 9, 2000
The Washington Bach Consort offered something besides a polished, enlightened program of sacred music of the baroque Wednesday evening at the Basilica of the Assumption in Baltimore. The concert, presented in association with the Chorus America Conference 2000 that has drawn more than 400 participants to town, also provided a fascinating, connect-the-dots lesson in music history. Call it six degrees of Johann Sebastian Bach. In addition to that Bach, the Consort's namesake, there were works by one of his uncles, Johann Christoph Bach; one of his great-uncles, Johann Bach; one of his nephews, Johann ErnstBach; one of his cousins, Johann Gottfried Walther; and one of his sons-in-law, Johann Christoph Altnikol.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | February 10, 2003
Joseph Marrow of Ellicott City considers himself an "organ nut." So when he heard about yesterday's Baltimore Bach Marathon - 7 1/2 straight hours of preludes, fugues, concertos and other pieces by German composer and organist Johann Sebastian Bach - he had to be there. "An organ can reproduce sound in a way that, I think, no other instrument can," he said, paying particular homage to the low notes that can make your insides shake. Hundreds of fans of organ music, Bach or both attended the annual marathon held from 12:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. at St. David's Church in Roland Park.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 20, 2000
Musically, the Easter season is synonymous with the greatest masterworks of the choral repertoire. Themes of death and resurrection pervade the quasi- operatic Passions of J. S. Bach, the requiems by composers such as Giuseppe Verdi, and the great concert Masses that bring the Christian liturgy alive with such extraordinary flair. Add to these the Old Testament oratorios of Handel and Mendelssohn, which provide thrilling takes on the events leading to the Exodus story of Passover, and you can see why this time of year is so chorally charged.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | October 1, 1993
BELIEVE IN MEDuff McKagan (Geffen 46052)Want to know how to tell when a rock act has gotten too big for its britches? Just wait for the guys in the back of the band to release solo albums. So if the news that Guns N' Roses bassist Duff McKagan had an album on the way left you thinking "ego trip," that's all right -- provided you don't let that keep you from actually listening to "Believe in Me." Because instead of sounding like the work of a guy who couldn't get his other band to take his songs seriously, "Believe in Me" is as hard-rocking and credible as any recent GNR project.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | February 10, 2003
Joseph Marrow of Ellicott City considers himself an "organ nut." So when he heard about yesterday's Baltimore Bach Marathon - 7 1/2 straight hours of preludes, fugues, concertos and other pieces by German composer and organist Johann Sebastian Bach - he had to be there. "An organ can reproduce sound in a way that, I think, no other instrument can," he said, paying particular homage to the low notes that can make your insides shake. Hundreds of fans of organ music, Bach or both attended the annual marathon held from 12:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. at St. David's Church in Roland Park.
FEATURES
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,Evening Sun Staff | January 22, 1991
Timothy Day, former principal flutist of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra and now playing and teaching in San Francisco, returns to Baltimore at 3:30 p.m. Sunday for a Pro Musica Rara program of music from the Court of Frederick II (The Great) of Prussia.The six chamber players in the Baltimore Museum of Art concert will play sonatas and other pieces by composers well known in the "Berlin School" of musicians employed by Frederick, according to Shirley Mathews, harpsichordist and artistic director.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 28, 2000
Not to be pedantic, but last year's millennial hype was yet another example of the historical illiteracy so prevalent in our dreadfully dumbed-down popular culture. The real changeover from the second millennium to the third (and from the 20th century to the 21st) arrives Monday. In tribute, then, let's acknowledge some of the greatest and most revealing music of the millennium about to pass. But this quick traversal is not a year late; everyone else was a year early. "The Lily and the Lamb," The Anonymous 4 -- Harmonia Mundi 907125 "The Sacred Bridge," The Boston Camerata -- Erato 45513 The second millennium was conceived in the crucible of mystery, faith and authority that was the Middle Ages.
NEWS
By Terry Teachout and Terry Teachout,Special to The Sun | January 29, 1995
Not counting restaurants, my favorite room in Baltimore is on the top floor of the downtown branch of the Enoch Pratt Free Library. It doesn't look like much from the outside -- just a nondescript blue metal door with "Mencken Room" painted on it -- but I love it anyway. The Mencken Room is the place where I unearthed the long-forgotten manuscript of an unpublished book America's greatest journalist.On the inside, the Mencken Room looks like the library of a slightly seedy men's club: book-lined walls, aging chandeliers, reasonably comfortable chairs.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 28, 2000
Not to be pedantic, but last year's millennial hype was yet another example of the historical illiteracy so prevalent in our dreadfully dumbed-down popular culture. The real changeover from the second millennium to the third (and from the 20th century to the 21st) arrives Monday. In tribute, then, let's acknowledge some of the greatest and most revealing music of the millennium about to pass. But this quick traversal is not a year late; everyone else was a year early. "The Lily and the Lamb," The Anonymous 4 -- Harmonia Mundi 907125 "The Sacred Bridge," The Boston Camerata -- Erato 45513 The second millennium was conceived in the crucible of mystery, faith and authority that was the Middle Ages.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | June 9, 2000
The Washington Bach Consort offered something besides a polished, enlightened program of sacred music of the baroque Wednesday evening at the Basilica of the Assumption in Baltimore. The concert, presented in association with the Chorus America Conference 2000 that has drawn more than 400 participants to town, also provided a fascinating, connect-the-dots lesson in music history. Call it six degrees of Johann Sebastian Bach. In addition to that Bach, the Consort's namesake, there were works by one of his uncles, Johann Christoph Bach; one of his great-uncles, Johann Bach; one of his nephews, Johann ErnstBach; one of his cousins, Johann Gottfried Walther; and one of his sons-in-law, Johann Christoph Altnikol.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 20, 2000
Musically, the Easter season is synonymous with the greatest masterworks of the choral repertoire. Themes of death and resurrection pervade the quasi- operatic Passions of J. S. Bach, the requiems by composers such as Giuseppe Verdi, and the great concert Masses that bring the Christian liturgy alive with such extraordinary flair. Add to these the Old Testament oratorios of Handel and Mendelssohn, which provide thrilling takes on the events leading to the Exodus story of Passover, and you can see why this time of year is so chorally charged.
NEWS
By Terry Teachout and Terry Teachout,Special to The Sun | January 29, 1995
Not counting restaurants, my favorite room in Baltimore is on the top floor of the downtown branch of the Enoch Pratt Free Library. It doesn't look like much from the outside -- just a nondescript blue metal door with "Mencken Room" painted on it -- but I love it anyway. The Mencken Room is the place where I unearthed the long-forgotten manuscript of an unpublished book America's greatest journalist.On the inside, the Mencken Room looks like the library of a slightly seedy men's club: book-lined walls, aging chandeliers, reasonably comfortable chairs.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | October 1, 1993
BELIEVE IN MEDuff McKagan (Geffen 46052)Want to know how to tell when a rock act has gotten too big for its britches? Just wait for the guys in the back of the band to release solo albums. So if the news that Guns N' Roses bassist Duff McKagan had an album on the way left you thinking "ego trip," that's all right -- provided you don't let that keep you from actually listening to "Believe in Me." Because instead of sounding like the work of a guy who couldn't get his other band to take his songs seriously, "Believe in Me" is as hard-rocking and credible as any recent GNR project.
FEATURES
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,Evening Sun Staff | January 22, 1991
Timothy Day, former principal flutist of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra and now playing and teaching in San Francisco, returns to Baltimore at 3:30 p.m. Sunday for a Pro Musica Rara program of music from the Court of Frederick II (The Great) of Prussia.The six chamber players in the Baltimore Museum of Art concert will play sonatas and other pieces by composers well known in the "Berlin School" of musicians employed by Frederick, according to Shirley Mathews, harpsichordist and artistic director.
EXPLORE
June 8, 2011
Missions and Masterworks presents "An Encore Performance," Friday, June 10, 7:30 p.m., at First United Methodist Church of Laurel, 424 Main St. Light refreshments will be served at 6:30 p.m. Laurel resident Mack Statham and his son, Robert, perform classical piano music, including two-piano renditions of music by Johann Sebastian Bach, Antonin Dvorak and Sergei Rachmaninoff. Proceeds will support the Thanksgiving in July Mission Project to benefit Price House, Talbot House and Reality House, which provide residential programs for adults battling addiction in the Laurel area.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,sun music critic | November 1, 2006
Ten recitals in four days. More than 18 hours of music. More than 200 compositions written for the organ by Johann Sebastian Bach, all played by one determined young man. "It's just one of these bizarre things organists do," says Donald Sutherland, coordinator of the organ department at the Peabody Institute, speaking about the rare Bach marathon planned this weekend by his star student. The Bach Organ Marathon takes place at 2 p.m. and 5 p.m. Friday; 2 p.m., 5 p.m. and 8 p.m. Saturday; 10 a.m., 2 p.m., 5 p.m. and 8 p.m. Sunday; and 7 p.m. Monday at Griswold Hall, Peabody Institute, 17 E. Mount Vernon Place.
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