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NEWS
By Bill Daley and Bill Daley,Chicago Tribune | November 28, 2007
The way Americans are going gaga for sushi rolls, seaweed may one day be as American as apple pie or corn on the cob. Nori is the seaweed star, derived from a marine algae called porphyra. Processed into paperlike sheets, nori may be too stylized for most people to think of it as seaweed. Certainly, nori doesn't look or smell like the stuff you steer clear of on the beach. But more and more Americans are eating the stuff, whether they know it's seaweed or not. And some more adventurous eaters are exploring other types of seaweeds, whose flavors range from bland to briny to smoky.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Donna Ellis | September 16, 2013
Some restaurants are like department stores. Their menus tend to offer something for almost everyone. Others are more like boutiques, offering a more specialized type of cuisine. One such place is SushiQ on Washington Boulevard in Elkridge. Rather than taking the Pan-Asian route that seems to be so popular these days, SushiQ owners Jennifer and Kenny Qiu provide fare that is virtually all Japanese.  Here, you won't find your future dinner entrée performing as part of a floor show.
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NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | April 2, 1992
Tony Fernandez remembers boyhood trips from his rowhouse on 25th Street in Baltimore to the lush waters of the Eastern Shore. There was seaweed then, which disappeared with the years and the filth. But a name was born out of the disappearance."Captain Seaweed!"This little kindergarten boy utters the cry the other day, his arms wide open and his voice rising a delighted octave above falsetto. love you."And the captain, once known as Tony Fernandez, a man who hit people very hard for a living, bends down and becomes the gentlest of characters, Captain Seaweed.
EXPLORE
By Donna Ellis | October 27, 2011
The Hickory Ridge Village Center has a lot to offer. The ambience there seems light, airy and contemporary when not a few of Columbia's commercial centers are looking rather tired these days. One of the center's long-time residents (since 1993, we're told, but it seems longer) is keeping up with the Hickory Ridge outside ambience with a charming new décor inside. Today's Peking Chef isn't exactly Zen, but the 130-seat restaurant provides a lovely, relaxed interior, with epoxy-topped wooden tables and wooden chairs in the center of the dining room, and booths along the sides.
FEATURES
By Randi Henderson | April 12, 1991
"Seaweed?" Michael Jones squinted at the hamburger in his hand, held it out curiously."Seaweed? Really? Yeah, it tastes fishy, now that you mention it."He laughed, took another bite of the 91 percent fat-free burger (with a little seaweed added for binder.) "No, not really, it's not fishy. But maybe that's why it's a little bland. It doesn't have quite as much flavor as the regular burger stuffed with fat."It was lunchtime yesterday at the Cranbrook McDonald's, debut day for McDonald's "McLean Deluxe" that the giant chain is promoting as a "revolutionary" new way to eat your beef, and diet, too.The McLean burger, now available in half the Baltimore metropolitan area's 90 McDonald's, will be in all stores by April 19, the national roll-out date.
NEWS
By Kenneth R. Weiss and Kenneth R. Weiss,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 4, 2008
COCONUT ISLAND, Oahu -- What was intended as a noble scientific experiment in the 1970s has turned into a modern-day plague for the delicate coral reefs surrounding the University of Hawaii's research station here. A professor scoured the seas for the heartiest, fastest-growing algae to help poor nations develop a seaweed crop for carrageenan - the gelatinous emulsifier used in products ranging from toothpaste and shoe polish to nonfat ice cream. Maxwell Doty succeeded, in one regard.
NEWS
By Heather Dewar and Heather Dewar,SUN STAFF | March 22, 2002
CHINCOTEAGUE BAY - The first sign of spring here lies under the sea, and it isn't a joy to behold. Imagine the most tangled spool of fishing line you've ever seen. Multiply it till it's 3 feet wide and 10 feet long, and color it a lurid green. This is chaetomorpha, a form of underwater plant life that is growing fast in the shallow waters along Assateague Island National Seashore. Until two years ago, fishermen had seen only a few tiny patches of the stuff in these waters, which were once believed to be some of the most pristine in the state.
NEWS
By Barbara Samson Mills | June 19, 1995
Walk on the beach together --it will be cool there.Taste the salt.Seaweed is clotted around a dead clam.The sun rolls like a blind eye.The waves steam.It is delightful here, they will say.Yellow-decaying waterforms your footsteps.
NEWS
April 29, 2007
The scarcity of seaweed in the Chesapeake Bay is now a cause for alarm, a sign of an ecosystem out of balance. Back in April 1964, some saw seaweed in the Chesapeake Bay as an unsightly nuisance. The Sun reported that a woman named Pauline W. Remey complained to the county commission that "sea lettuce" on her bay properties caused noxious odors. A political merry-go-round ensued. The county board asked President Lyndon B. Johnson's administration what could be done about the problem.
NEWS
By Amy S. Rosenberg and Amy S. Rosenberg,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | May 27, 2001
SEA ISLE CITY, N.J. - Bobby McKeefery, assistant chief of public works in this beach town, is getting an education this year - in seaweed. As in why seaweed may be a good thing to leave on the beach and not just another affront to Jersey sunbathers to be mechanically raked up with the day's other beach trash. Truthfully, he's still a bit skeptical. "We're learning new things every day," McKeefery said. "I guess there's bugs that are eating up the seaweed. The sanderlings and plovers are eating up the bugs.
NEWS
By Kenneth R. Weiss and Kenneth R. Weiss,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 4, 2008
COCONUT ISLAND, Oahu -- What was intended as a noble scientific experiment in the 1970s has turned into a modern-day plague for the delicate coral reefs surrounding the University of Hawaii's research station here. A professor scoured the seas for the heartiest, fastest-growing algae to help poor nations develop a seaweed crop for carrageenan - the gelatinous emulsifier used in products ranging from toothpaste and shoe polish to nonfat ice cream. Maxwell Doty succeeded, in one regard.
NEWS
By Bill Daley and Bill Daley,Chicago Tribune | November 28, 2007
The way Americans are going gaga for sushi rolls, seaweed may one day be as American as apple pie or corn on the cob. Nori is the seaweed star, derived from a marine algae called porphyra. Processed into paperlike sheets, nori may be too stylized for most people to think of it as seaweed. Certainly, nori doesn't look or smell like the stuff you steer clear of on the beach. But more and more Americans are eating the stuff, whether they know it's seaweed or not. And some more adventurous eaters are exploring other types of seaweeds, whose flavors range from bland to briny to smoky.
NEWS
April 29, 2007
The scarcity of seaweed in the Chesapeake Bay is now a cause for alarm, a sign of an ecosystem out of balance. Back in April 1964, some saw seaweed in the Chesapeake Bay as an unsightly nuisance. The Sun reported that a woman named Pauline W. Remey complained to the county commission that "sea lettuce" on her bay properties caused noxious odors. A political merry-go-round ensued. The county board asked President Lyndon B. Johnson's administration what could be done about the problem.
FEATURES
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN REPORTER | June 30, 2006
Nascent star Zac Efron, 18, best known for his role in the mega-popular High School Musical, has signed on to play teen heartthrob Link Larkin in the movie version of the musical Hairspray. This has proven to be a big week for the coming musical version of John Waters' 1988 film about desegregation on a TV dance floor in early-1960s Baltimore. Elijah Kelley, a 19-year-old Georgia native, has been picked to play Seaweed. Efron, who will play the pop star at the center of the movie's fictional Corny Collins Show, has become a favorite of the preteen set thanks to his role in High School Musical.
NEWS
By David Kohn and David Kohn,SUN STAFF | July 18, 2003
Coral reefs across the Caribbean have suffered an 80 percent decline in cover during the past three decades, a far more devastating loss than scientists had expected, according to a study released yesterday. "It's depressing," said marine biologist Isabelle Cote, one of the authors of the study, which appeared in this week's Science. "We all knew that we had a bad situation on our hands. But nobody expected it to be this bad." The researchers gathered information from 65 previous studies of 263 sites and analyzed it to construct a regional picture.
NEWS
By Heather Dewar and Heather Dewar,SUN STAFF | March 22, 2002
CHINCOTEAGUE BAY - The first sign of spring here lies under the sea, and it isn't a joy to behold. Imagine the most tangled spool of fishing line you've ever seen. Multiply it till it's 3 feet wide and 10 feet long, and color it a lurid green. This is chaetomorpha, a form of underwater plant life that is growing fast in the shallow waters along Assateague Island National Seashore. Until two years ago, fishermen had seen only a few tiny patches of the stuff in these waters, which were once believed to be some of the most pristine in the state.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,Sun Staff Writer | June 1, 1995
Hip-deep in water, teen-age boys lowered a black cloth to the bottom of the Severn River yesterday, creating a foundation for what may become the state's first community nursery for seaweed.Naturalists hope to cultivate a stand of redhead grass on the half-acre site at Brewer Point in Sherwood Forest.With luck, wild ducks and swans will leave some of the grass uneaten so that plugs of the seaweed can be transplanted elsewhere in the river.Yesterday, seven seniors at Baltimore's Gilman School, all members of the championship lacrosse team, put down 250 feet of filter cloth in sections, then anchored it with 30- to 70-pound rocks.
FEATURES
By Mary Corey | December 2, 1990
Captain SeaweedHe's easy to spot. Just look for the guy with the green face, blue hair, white suit and . . . slimy seaweed dangling from his shoulder.No, he's not the latest superhero or some teen-age mutant ninja-ed creature that kids will beg for this Christmas.He's Captain Seaweed, protector of the universe, guardian of the waterways, friend of the forest. Since April, he has traveled to schools, parades and fairs in Maryland weaving tales of a turtle named Myrtle and a minnow named Mindy who need help protecting the environment.
NEWS
By Amy S. Rosenberg and Amy S. Rosenberg,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | May 27, 2001
SEA ISLE CITY, N.J. - Bobby McKeefery, assistant chief of public works in this beach town, is getting an education this year - in seaweed. As in why seaweed may be a good thing to leave on the beach and not just another affront to Jersey sunbathers to be mechanically raked up with the day's other beach trash. Truthfully, he's still a bit skeptical. "We're learning new things every day," McKeefery said. "I guess there's bugs that are eating up the seaweed. The sanderlings and plovers are eating up the bugs.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Richardson and Cameron Barry and David Richardson and Cameron Barry,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 5, 2000
We arrived early at Joss Cafe on a recent Saturday night because we'd been told that the Japanese restaurant is very small and very popular. Even at 5:30, there were quite a few tables filled in the restaurants tiny front room. But the owners have added a larger dining room in back to cut down on the lines that sometimes form outside. By the time we left, there were no lines, but the place had been doing a brisk business for hours. A line outside would be justifiable. This still-small restaurant on Annapolis Main Street serves Japanese dishes cooked and raw that are fresher, more imaginative and more complex in flavor than any others we can remember having eaten in this region.
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