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NEWS
June 3, 2013
If the cops have so much free time that they can do night time programs to see if I am wearing my seat belt then something is wrong. Maybe instead of protecting me from myself they should protect me from the "Public Enemy No. 1" Black Guerrilla Family and the trucking company that caused the accident with the train this week. Then the cops would be doing something to protect me from others. Or take that time to protect me from people texting and driving like fools. Last weekend I went to my cabin in the woods near Paw Paw, W. Va., and I saw one cop the entire 90-mile ride each way on Interstate 70. But I saw a few stupid drivers texting who were making it dangerous for others on the road.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
Baltimore Sun staff | October 3, 2013
Baltimore Police are planning a crackdown on drivers who use hand-held phones behind the wheel or fail to use seat belts. Days after a state law took effect tightening restrictions on cellphone use while driving, the department announced that it would set up a checkpoint Friday afternoon to look for violators. Another new law requires all adult passengers to wear seatbelts, and police said they'd be stepping up enforcement on that front as well. The checkpoint will be at Harford Road and The Alameda starting Friday at 5 p.m. "Efforts to enforce the law will be citywide, this checkpoint being the first large scale deployment of officers for that purpose," police said in a news release.
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NEWS
By Herb McMillan | April 20, 2011
Good day, ladies and gentlemen, this is your Captain (and State Delegate) Herb McMillan. We've leveled off at our cruising altitude, but you need to keep your seat belts fastened. We're in for a rough ride. Here's why. Our route of flight isn't what I voted for, but the liberal flight planners in our General Assembly think the economic weather is improving. Looking to the left, you see they increased state spending by another billion dollars, and that we project $1.4 billion deficits for years to come.
NEWS
By Krishana Davis and Pamela Wood, Baltimore Sun Media Group | October 2, 2013
Motorists around Maryland found their cellphone conversations interrupted by flashing blue lights Tuesday, as tougher restrictions went into effect on the use of hand-held devices while driving. Police were on the lookout for people driving with phones to their ears on the first day of a state law that makes the violation a primary traffic offense. Previously, drivers could only be cited if they were stopped for breaking another traffic law. Officials around the state said they were issuing a mixture of warnings and citations as they attempted to get motorists acquainted with the new restrictions.
EXPLORE
From The Aegis | May 22, 2012
For the rest of May, and especially over the Memorial Day holiday weekend, Maryland State Police from the Bel Air Barrack say they plan to be out in force on traffic details, with a special focus on people who drink and drive as well as those who aren't wearing seat belts. In a press release issued recently, the state police said they want "to remind everyone that buckling up is the single most effective thing you can do to protect yourself in a motor vehicle collision. " The enforcement effort focusing on people not wearing seat belts goes by the name "Click It or Ticket," and has been under way since the beginning of the month.
NEWS
December 29, 1992
On some major measures of mortality -- cancer and inner-cit homicides -- Maryland doesn't fare well. But here is one statistic of life and death of which the state can be proud:Maryland is the leader in the continental United States in seat-belt compliance. And partly as a result of that fact, the state is en route to its lowest total of highway fatalities in nearly two decades.The lowest number of highway deaths in Maryland, 616, was recorded in 1964. We've had almost two dozen more than that to date with only three days left in the year.
NEWS
December 22, 1993
It seems so elemental it shouldn't bear a reminder: People cannot fly.Motorists who are thrown from a vehicle in a crash are four times more likely to be killed than if they had remained within the car. Fortunately, millions of people have taken that fact to heart as seat belt use in the country has swelled -- especially in Maryland, which last year led the continental United States in seat-belt compliance.But folks who need a refresher on the importance of seat belts, shoulder harnesses or child safety seats should look no farther than the recent headline news involving two athletes.
NEWS
By Bill Talbott and Bill Talbott,Sun Staff Writer | March 23, 1994
Twelve people whose lives were saved or injuries greatly reduced by seat belts or child safety seats were honored with framed certificates by Lt. Roy Neigh at the Westminster state police barracks yesterday.Those honored were all drivers or passengers in vehicles involved in accidents in Carroll County within the past year, said Lieutenant Neigh, barracks commander.They are Anna Mae Warehime, Brian Keith Jones, Diana Leaman Stull, William Harry Hill, Leslie Nicol Vaselaros, Trey Miles III, Gail Lee Smith, Kimberly Freeland, Kyle Patrick Freeland, Mary Anna Phillips, Kristopher M. Phillips and Karyn E. Phillips.
NEWS
By Bill Talbott and Bill Talbott,Sun Staff Writer | November 14, 1994
C Drivers in Carroll County, particularly those of pickup trucks, have slipped considerably in the use of seat belts, according to surveys conducted last month.Pickup truck drivers complied with the seat belt requirement only 57.4 percent of the time during the survey, compared with an 82 percent compliance rate in a survey several months ago.The surveys are an activity in the Golden Eagle Competition, and no citations were issued during the observations.The Golden Eagle Competition is a new highway safety initiative sponsored by the Maryland Association of Women Highway Safety Leaders and the State Highway Administration, according to the Carroll County Health Department.
NEWS
March 26, 1991
The city of Westminster and its police force have been recognized with a state award for promoting car seat-belt use.Westminster was one of 10 entities, as were Howard and Frederick counties, commended for their efforts by the state Department of Transportation last week.The awards, sponsored by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, are open to a variety of organizations, including local governments, military bases, companies and schools, that promote seat-belt use and demonstrate the effectiveness of their program.
HEALTH
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | August 16, 2013
Driving on Park Heights Avenue recently, Debbi Baer happened on the kind of scene that tends to transform her, Clark Kent-style, from apparently mild-mannered Pikesville grandmother into fearless crusader. Stopped at a red light, as she recalls the story, she looked into the next car and saw a baby in a woman's lap. No seat belts or safety seats were in sight. She swung into action. The 4-foot-11 Baer used her Ford Taurus to block the woman's path. She reported the violation to a nearby policeman.
NEWS
June 3, 2013
If the cops have so much free time that they can do night time programs to see if I am wearing my seat belt then something is wrong. Maybe instead of protecting me from myself they should protect me from the "Public Enemy No. 1" Black Guerrilla Family and the trucking company that caused the accident with the train this week. Then the cops would be doing something to protect me from others. Or take that time to protect me from people texting and driving like fools. Last weekend I went to my cabin in the woods near Paw Paw, W. Va., and I saw one cop the entire 90-mile ride each way on Interstate 70. But I saw a few stupid drivers texting who were making it dangerous for others on the road.
FEATURES
By Kim Fernandez, For The Baltimore Sun | March 14, 2013
On the surface, those doggie seatbelts and car harnesses featured in catalogs seem like a good idea. After all, if we buckle up on the road, shouldn't our pets? The difference is that while human seatbelts are carefully tested and held to strict quality and design standards, the same is not true for pet restraints, so there's no guarantee Fido or Fluffy is actually safer wearing one. That may be about to change. Carmaker Subaru of America, Inc. , announced it has teamed up with the Center for Pet Safety to fund testing of car safety restraints for pets.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | November 20, 2012
As state officials unveiled a giant statue of a crash test dummy at its new home in Glen Burnie Tuesday, they deemed it "destined to be a regional landmark. " But towering at five times larger than life and weighing 2 tons, the bright-yellow tribute to safety drew fears it would become a regional source of rubbernecking. "We had a tremendous amount of thought about that," said John Kuo, administrator for the state Motor Vehicle Administration, whose headquarters became the dummy's final resting place.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2012
An Odenton man died Saturday night after the car he was driving collided head-on with a Maryland Transit Administration bus in Glen Burnie, sending his 14-year-old passenger and nine people on the bus to area hospitals, police said. Anne Arundel County police said Marcus Antonio Anderson, 27, of Odenton, died before reaching a hospital after the 9:47 p.m. crash. His passenger, who was not named by police, was taken to Johns Hopkins Pediatric Trauma Center, where he was in stable condition, police said.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | August 13, 2012
Baltimore's school children call her "The Sex Lady," and during the four decades Deborah Roffman has taught them about their bodies, the only thing that hasn't changed is the discomfort of their parents when they try to talk about sex. Even the sex has changed, becoming casual and transactional, invasive and pervasive. Marketing and advertising have driven the mercury higher. Technology has put sex only a touch or a keystroke away. "The boundaries that used to separate children's lives from adults' lives have in many respects vanished," said Ms. Roffman, who has taught at Park School for 38 years and often teaches at other independent schools locally and nationwide.
NEWS
September 18, 1995
Your Intrepid One was cruising near Calvert Hall College High School in Towson when a school bus full of youngsters crossed in front of a car pulling out of a parking lot at Loch Raven Middle School.The bus came to an abrupt stop, and many of the passengers jerked forward. No one was hurt -- so it seemed -- and the bus proceeded seconds later.But it made us wonder: Without safety belts, what's to keep these kids from getting injured in an accident?We regularly get calls and letters from readers complaining about the safety of school buses not equipped with seat belts.
NEWS
By Kris Antonelli and Kris Antonelli,Sun Staff Writer | March 31, 1994
Cheree Hippler thought she was getting a ticket yesterday when Sgt. Beverly McGough ordered her to pull her car into a small parking lot on the campus of Anne Arundel Community College.But Sergeant McGough, a campus security officer, didn't stop Ms. Hippler for speeding or breaking any other laws. She stopped her with a reward for wearing her seat belt -- a $10 gift certificate for gas at a nearby Shell station."I thought I was getting pulled over for speeding," said Ms. Hippler, a 19-year-old freshman.
NEWS
By Scott Dance and Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | July 31, 2012
Michele Lorenz, a 42-year-old Columbia woman, died in a car accident in Columbia on Monday night after her truck collided with a tree, according to Howard County police. Police responded to the 5600 block of High Tor Hill about 9:30 p.m. for a report that a truck had crashed, police said. Police said based on an initial investigation, they believe the woman was alone, driving a 1999 Dodge Dakota south on the road when the truck left the roadway and struck the tree. Police believe speed and failure to drive within a single lane contributed to the crash.
EXPLORE
From The Aegis | May 22, 2012
For the rest of May, and especially over the Memorial Day holiday weekend, Maryland State Police from the Bel Air Barrack say they plan to be out in force on traffic details, with a special focus on people who drink and drive as well as those who aren't wearing seat belts. In a press release issued recently, the state police said they want "to remind everyone that buckling up is the single most effective thing you can do to protect yourself in a motor vehicle collision. " The enforcement effort focusing on people not wearing seat belts goes by the name "Click It or Ticket," and has been under way since the beginning of the month.
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