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Seasonal Affective Disorder

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By Holly Selby | October 4, 2007
Brilliantly colored leaves. Crisp air. Changes in light. All are nature's way of signaling fall has arrived and will eventually give way to winter. For some people, however, the changes in light may cause a type of depression called seasonal affective disorder, says Karen Swartz, director of clinical programs for the Johns Hopkins Mood Disorder Center. According to the American Academy of Family Physicians, as many as a half-million people in the United States may experience significant symptoms of SAD or "winter depression."
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HEALTH
By Megan Twohey and Tribune Newspapers | February 25, 2010
Since she was hired two years ago as a medical assistant in suburban Chicago, Jennifer Simonsis has come to an agreement with her employer: During the winter, she is given time off to see her doctor, frequent breaks, and help in setting up a light-therapy lamp at her desk. Joining a controversial trend, Simonsis sought workplace accommodations for seasonal affective disorder, or SAD - depression triggered by limited daylight in winter. Pointing to a federal law that prohibits employers from discriminating against the disabled, some SAD sufferers say they are entitled to schedule changes, access to windows and other modifications.
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NEWS
By JONATHAN D. ROCKOFF and JONATHAN D. ROCKOFF,SUN REPORTER | June 13, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Americans suffering from severe, repeated cases of the winter blues now have a pill to provide help. The Food and Drug Administration announced yesterday that it would allow sales of Wellbutrin XL, a prescription drug for major depression that has also been used to treat nicotine withdrawal, for adults 18 years and older suffering from the winter blues. The pill, made by GlaxoSmithKline, is the first approved for seasonal affective disorder, or SAD, as the blues are technically called.
NEWS
By Michael Sragow | michael.sragow@baltsun.com and Baltimore Sun reporter | February 19, 2010
Animation "Logorama": This giddy, inventive nightmare chase from France, set in Los Angeles and out of this world, wrings nonstop surprise and a sort of beauty from a vision of corporate logos taking over Earth, the solar system and the Milky Way. It leaves you perched on just the right spot between exhilaration and exhaustion. "Granny O'Grimm's Sleeping Beauty": Americans should embrace this Irish cartoon as a worthy update of "Fractured Fairy Tales" from "Rocky and Bullwinkle": a computer-animated crone tells her frightened granddaughter her own embittered version of "The Sleeping Beauty," rendered in an elegant, cracked version of classical 2-D animation.
HEALTH
By Megan Twohey and Tribune Newspapers | February 25, 2010
Since she was hired two years ago as a medical assistant in suburban Chicago, Jennifer Simonsis has come to an agreement with her employer: During the winter, she is given time off to see her doctor, frequent breaks, and help in setting up a light-therapy lamp at her desk. Joining a controversial trend, Simonsis sought workplace accommodations for seasonal affective disorder, or SAD - depression triggered by limited daylight in winter. Pointing to a federal law that prohibits employers from discriminating against the disabled, some SAD sufferers say they are entitled to schedule changes, access to windows and other modifications.
NEWS
By Judy Foreman and Judy Foreman,Special to the Sun | March 4, 2005
Do cold medications cause prostate problems? No. But pseudoephedrine, which is ubiquitous in decongestant cold remedies, may bring undetected prostate problems to light. Usually, these problems -- chiefly trouble with urination due to an enlarged prostate -- go away when the medication is stopped. Virtually all men develop an enlarged prostate as they age, which makes them urinate more frequently, but is not an indication of cancer. Pseudoephedrine acts on molecules in muscles and blood vessels: In the nose, it constricts tiny blood vessels and dries up nasal secretions.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | December 13, 1993
Jack Kent Cooke for Marylander of the Year!A manic depressive is someone who cannot decide between Holiday Spirit and Seasonal Affective Disorder.The Canadian paranoia that the U.S. will use NAFTA to seize Canada's clean water is under study in Washington.Q. What does the comptroller do? A. Keep the rest of city government honest. Next question.
NEWS
By Shari Roan and Shari Roan,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 9, 2007
Daylight-saving time begins three weeks earlier this year and lasts one week later - welcome news for people who relish the extra afternoon light to garden, ride a bicycle, walk the dog or just take out the trash when they can still see the curb. But the extension, which begins Sunday, could actually make millions of Americans feel less sunny. For those people - suffering from seasonal affective disorder or its milder cousin, winter blues - the corresponding reduction in morning light may worsen or lengthen their depression, doctors and mood experts say. "We're very worried about it," says Michael Terman, director of New York-Presbyterian Hospital's Center for Light Treatment and Biological Rhythms.
NEWS
By Sherry Joe and Sherry Joe,Sun Staff Writer | February 20, 1994
If you feel like pulling the covers over your head, eating candy and avoiding your friends, you may be sick of winter -- or suffering from seasonal affective disorder, says a psychiatrist at Howard County General Hospital.For the past 13 years, Dr. Alix Rey has been treating patients for the debilitating depression that is triggered by the shortened amount of sunlight that starts in September or October and lasts until April."It's different from the winter blues," Dr. Rey said. "It's not something that goes away.
NEWS
By Stephanie McKinnon McDade and Stephanie McKinnon McDade,SACRAMENTO BEE | February 6, 2000
In the fall, the sun is bright, the air is crisp and the leaves are brilliant shades of flame. In this light, it's hard to find fault with fall or its follow-up act. But Muriel Strand is no fan of winter. "When I was a kid, the time between Christmas and President's Day was a wasteland," she says. "It's still glum." Strand's moodiness can hardly be classified as depression or even seasonal affective disorder (SAD), a mental disorder related to the change in seasons. She simply comes down with a case of the winter blues, the doldrums, the blahs.
FEATURES
By Holly Selby | October 4, 2007
Brilliantly colored leaves. Crisp air. Changes in light. All are nature's way of signaling fall has arrived and will eventually give way to winter. For some people, however, the changes in light may cause a type of depression called seasonal affective disorder, says Karen Swartz, director of clinical programs for the Johns Hopkins Mood Disorder Center. According to the American Academy of Family Physicians, as many as a half-million people in the United States may experience significant symptoms of SAD or "winter depression."
NEWS
By Shari Roan and Shari Roan,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 9, 2007
Daylight-saving time begins three weeks earlier this year and lasts one week later - welcome news for people who relish the extra afternoon light to garden, ride a bicycle, walk the dog or just take out the trash when they can still see the curb. But the extension, which begins Sunday, could actually make millions of Americans feel less sunny. For those people - suffering from seasonal affective disorder or its milder cousin, winter blues - the corresponding reduction in morning light may worsen or lengthen their depression, doctors and mood experts say. "We're very worried about it," says Michael Terman, director of New York-Presbyterian Hospital's Center for Light Treatment and Biological Rhythms.
NEWS
By JONATHAN D. ROCKOFF and JONATHAN D. ROCKOFF,SUN REPORTER | June 13, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Americans suffering from severe, repeated cases of the winter blues now have a pill to provide help. The Food and Drug Administration announced yesterday that it would allow sales of Wellbutrin XL, a prescription drug for major depression that has also been used to treat nicotine withdrawal, for adults 18 years and older suffering from the winter blues. The pill, made by GlaxoSmithKline, is the first approved for seasonal affective disorder, or SAD, as the blues are technically called.
NEWS
By Judy Foreman and Judy Foreman,Special to the Sun | March 4, 2005
Do cold medications cause prostate problems? No. But pseudoephedrine, which is ubiquitous in decongestant cold remedies, may bring undetected prostate problems to light. Usually, these problems -- chiefly trouble with urination due to an enlarged prostate -- go away when the medication is stopped. Virtually all men develop an enlarged prostate as they age, which makes them urinate more frequently, but is not an indication of cancer. Pseudoephedrine acts on molecules in muscles and blood vessels: In the nose, it constricts tiny blood vessels and dries up nasal secretions.
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD | December 6, 2004
IT'S NICE TO see we're still being bombarded with the usual mixed messages this holiday season. Where's your holiday spirit? everyone asks. Enjoy the season for once! Don't let the stress get to you! Then you turn on the 6 o'clock news and they're talking about dry Christmas trees torching the house and outdoor lights on over-burdened extension cords electrocuting the family pet and hot new toys the kids could choke on. Reach out to loved ones this holiday season! everyone says. Then you pick up a newspaper and it's filled with headlines like: "How to sit down to dinner with people you can't stand" and "Surviving the holidays with your dysfunctional in-laws" and "Sure, your mother's a monster!
NEWS
By Stephanie McKinnon McDade and Stephanie McKinnon McDade,SACRAMENTO BEE | February 6, 2000
In the fall, the sun is bright, the air is crisp and the leaves are brilliant shades of flame. In this light, it's hard to find fault with fall or its follow-up act. But Muriel Strand is no fan of winter. "When I was a kid, the time between Christmas and President's Day was a wasteland," she says. "It's still glum." Strand's moodiness can hardly be classified as depression or even seasonal affective disorder (SAD), a mental disorder related to the change in seasons. She simply comes down with a case of the winter blues, the doldrums, the blahs.
NEWS
By Michael Sragow | michael.sragow@baltsun.com and Baltimore Sun reporter | February 19, 2010
Animation "Logorama": This giddy, inventive nightmare chase from France, set in Los Angeles and out of this world, wrings nonstop surprise and a sort of beauty from a vision of corporate logos taking over Earth, the solar system and the Milky Way. It leaves you perched on just the right spot between exhilaration and exhaustion. "Granny O'Grimm's Sleeping Beauty": Americans should embrace this Irish cartoon as a worthy update of "Fractured Fairy Tales" from "Rocky and Bullwinkle": a computer-animated crone tells her frightened granddaughter her own embittered version of "The Sleeping Beauty," rendered in an elegant, cracked version of classical 2-D animation.
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD | December 6, 2004
IT'S NICE TO see we're still being bombarded with the usual mixed messages this holiday season. Where's your holiday spirit? everyone asks. Enjoy the season for once! Don't let the stress get to you! Then you turn on the 6 o'clock news and they're talking about dry Christmas trees torching the house and outdoor lights on over-burdened extension cords electrocuting the family pet and hot new toys the kids could choke on. Reach out to loved ones this holiday season! everyone says. Then you pick up a newspaper and it's filled with headlines like: "How to sit down to dinner with people you can't stand" and "Surviving the holidays with your dysfunctional in-laws" and "Sure, your mother's a monster!
NEWS
By Sherry Joe and Sherry Joe,Sun Staff Writer | February 20, 1994
If you feel like pulling the covers over your head, eating candy and avoiding your friends, you may be sick of winter -- or suffering from seasonal affective disorder, says a psychiatrist at Howard County General Hospital.For the past 13 years, Dr. Alix Rey has been treating patients for the debilitating depression that is triggered by the shortened amount of sunlight that starts in September or October and lasts until April."It's different from the winter blues," Dr. Rey said. "It's not something that goes away.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | December 13, 1993
Jack Kent Cooke for Marylander of the Year!A manic depressive is someone who cannot decide between Holiday Spirit and Seasonal Affective Disorder.The Canadian paranoia that the U.S. will use NAFTA to seize Canada's clean water is under study in Washington.Q. What does the comptroller do? A. Keep the rest of city government honest. Next question.
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