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NEWS
By William Thompson and William Thompson,Staff Writer | November 29, 1992
CLAIBORNE -- Every time Ken Guinness takes his privat plane soaring over the tidewater creeks and fields in these environs, he winds up landing in the water.The wet touchdowns are intentional, though, because the 1947 Cessna Mr. Guinness bought two years ago is a seaplane outfitted with two watertight floats serving as its landing apparatus.While seaplanes have been around almost as long as airplanes, they are relatively rare in Maryland, despite the state's enormous Chesapeake Bay and many waterways and lakes.
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NEWS
By Andrew Schaefer and Andrew Schaefer,sun reporter | February 15, 2007
Retired engineer and businessman Gilbert Pascal says he has been interested in airplanes since he was in a stroller, and he likes to fly around the country in his Cessna with his wife, visiting museums. Recently, he traveled across the continent in hopes of landing a much larger plane: the 140,000-pound, Middle River-born Martin Mars, the largest production seaplane ever built. Pascal is chairman of the Glenn L. Martin Maryland Aviation Museum's board, and he describes the endeavor to bring the Mars back from British Columbia to where it was built as a "natural pursuit."
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NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Staff writer | April 23, 1992
A Clements Creek pilot who wants to land his seaplane regularly on the Severn River is taking flak from neighbors, who say the proposed landing area is too narrow and congested and his flying too erratic.Pilot Charlie Hunter, who holds an air-speed record for Annapolis to Los Angeles, is seeking to register Maryland's first private, non-commercial seaplane base on a 5,000-foot strip between Brewer and Saltworks creeks.But neighbors from the Saefern, Epping Forest and Sherwood Forestcommunities attempted to shoot Hunter down Wednesday night, asking an administrative law judge to reject his request.
NEWS
By SOUTH FLORIDA SUN-SENTINEL | December 20, 2005
MIAMI -- A propeller-driven seaplane with 20 people on board caught fire and crashed off Miami Beach shortly after taking off yesterday for the Bahamas fishing resort of Bimini. Rescue workers recovered 19 bodies by early evening, in an operation carried out with the submerged plane visible under water. Most of the bodies were found in the fuselage, still strapped to their seats. The passengers included three infants. The plane was 58 years old, a twin-engine Grumman G-73 Turbo Mallard, manufactured in 1947, according to the Federal Aviation Administration.
NEWS
By Kirsten Scharnberg and Kirsten Scharnberg,SUN STAFF | April 24, 1999
The day after an experimental seaplane crashed into Selby Bay, killing one man and seriously injuring another, local residents were calling the neighborly relationship between vehicles that take to the sky and vehicles that stick to the sea a recipe for disaster.In just a couple square miles in and around Selby Bay, at least five marinas are filled with boats of every size and variety. And in the center of those piers is a waterfront property where seaplanes -- those loud aircraft suspended on banana-shaped pontoons -- take off.Since local resident Ike Whitby started renting space in his waterfront back yard to seaplane owners about two years ago, boaters have watched their little bay turn into a busy runway.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN STAFF | January 10, 2002
This may not be the best time to start a business flying a small airplane in the vicinity of Baltimore's tallest buildings. Or is it? Hal Klee, for one, thinks so. Klee, a retired Air Force pilot, hopes to launch a seaplane tour operation this spring in Canton. Flights would take the paying public over Fort McHenry and the spot where Francis Scott Key wrote "The Star-Spangled Banner" in 1814 as he watched bombs bursting in air. Though he dreamed up the idea years ago while shuttling a Baltimore banker in his private seaplane, Klee said the Sept.
NEWS
By Sarah Merkey and Sarah Merkey,SUN STAFF | January 25, 2004
Nature dished out its worst last fall to the Havre de Grace Seaplane Base in the form of Tropical Storm Isabel. Still, manager Bill Matthews insists, "The timing was good." The base sustained substantial damage to its dock as a result of the storm, but, Matthews said, "It's not going to hurt us too bad. The new dock should be back by June 15. The old one was in shambles." In October, Gov. Robert L. Ehrilch Jr. approved a $281,160 grant from the Maryland Aviation Administration for the construction of a new dock and improvements to other areas of the base.
NEWS
December 8, 1991
The death of Pan Am Corp. ends an often-glorious 64-year history of an airline which for decades was regarded as this country's flagship carrier.The early days of Pan American were a series of pioneering feats in commercial aviation under the firm's visionary founder, Juan T. Trippe. In 1927, the airline inaugurated the first scheduled international flight -- a mail run between Key West, Fla., and Havana. After becoming the first U.S. airline to develop four-engine flying boats, Pan Am launched the first scheduled trans-Pacific service in 1935.
FEATURES
January 18, 1996
Phil Donahue, who invented the issue-driven daytime talk show, then watched his ratings slip while low-brow imitators outperformed him, is calling it quits at the end of the season.A nine-time Emmy Award winner as outstanding host, Mr. Donahue will continue to work on TV specials and new projects in broadcasting and cable, his syndicator, Multimedia Entertainment Inc., announced yesterday.Seen in more than 45 countries, "Donahue" marked its 25th anniversary in 1992. It has won 20 national Emmys and broadcasting's prestigious Peabody award.
NEWS
By GWINN OWENS | May 10, 1995
One of the remarkable achievements of American military leadership in World War II was in summoning forth from civilian life a bunch of confused recruits and assigning them to effective roles in a vast war-making machine.For the war effort this was good; for the individual it could be stressful and unpredictable, even chaotic.After many months of specialized quartermaster training, in steersmanship, signaling and navigation, my assumption was that there was somewhere a fighting ship desperate to make use of my training.
NEWS
By Sarah Merkey and Sarah Merkey,SUN STAFF | January 25, 2004
Nature dished out its worst last fall to the Havre de Grace Seaplane Base in the form of Tropical Storm Isabel. Still, manager Bill Matthews insists, "The timing was good." The base sustained substantial damage to its dock as a result of the storm, but, Matthews said, "It's not going to hurt us too bad. The new dock should be back by June 15. The old one was in shambles." In October, Gov. Robert L. Ehrilch Jr. approved a $281,160 grant from the Maryland Aviation Administration for the construction of a new dock and improvements to other areas of the base.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN STAFF | January 10, 2002
This may not be the best time to start a business flying a small airplane in the vicinity of Baltimore's tallest buildings. Or is it? Hal Klee, for one, thinks so. Klee, a retired Air Force pilot, hopes to launch a seaplane tour operation this spring in Canton. Flights would take the paying public over Fort McHenry and the spot where Francis Scott Key wrote "The Star-Spangled Banner" in 1814 as he watched bombs bursting in air. Though he dreamed up the idea years ago while shuttling a Baltimore banker in his private seaplane, Klee said the Sept.
NEWS
By Kirsten Scharnberg and Kirsten Scharnberg,SUN STAFF | April 24, 1999
The day after an experimental seaplane crashed into Selby Bay, killing one man and seriously injuring another, local residents were calling the neighborly relationship between vehicles that take to the sky and vehicles that stick to the sea a recipe for disaster.In just a couple square miles in and around Selby Bay, at least five marinas are filled with boats of every size and variety. And in the center of those piers is a waterfront property where seaplanes -- those loud aircraft suspended on banana-shaped pontoons -- take off.Since local resident Ike Whitby started renting space in his waterfront back yard to seaplane owners about two years ago, boaters have watched their little bay turn into a busy runway.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | June 12, 1997
Two Annapolis environmentalists walked away with minor injuries yesterday after the single-engine seaplane they were using in a survey of pondweed lost power over an Anne Arundel County creek and slammed into the woods behind a residential community."
NEWS
By Gilbert Sandler | March 19, 1996
BY THE 1960s, the storied B&O ''Royal Blue'' to New York was gone. Today at BWI, at what was once Friendship Airport, they are handling 600 flights a day. And in the inner harbor there is not a sign of the old passenger steamers. Their dreamy trips up the rivers and down the bay are only memories, stories parents and grandparents tell to children. . . .1938: The Locust Point ferry across the harbor from the Foot of Broadway (now called Fells Point) to Haubert Street in Locust Point made its last run on New Year's Eve. It had provided a 4-minute trip, 15 times a day. But it was costing the city $25,000 a year and the City Council did away with it.1939: The City of Baltimore, the luxury (for its day)
FEATURES
January 18, 1996
Phil Donahue, who invented the issue-driven daytime talk show, then watched his ratings slip while low-brow imitators outperformed him, is calling it quits at the end of the season.A nine-time Emmy Award winner as outstanding host, Mr. Donahue will continue to work on TV specials and new projects in broadcasting and cable, his syndicator, Multimedia Entertainment Inc., announced yesterday.Seen in more than 45 countries, "Donahue" marked its 25th anniversary in 1992. It has won 20 national Emmys and broadcasting's prestigious Peabody award.
NEWS
By GILBERT SANDLER | April 20, 1993
TODAY, out of what is known as Baltimore-Washington International Airport, there are planes taking off for 80 destinations across America and around the world. The "BWI" terminal occupies almost a million square feet on 3,200 acres; its parking lots accommodate 10,000 cars; it manages 600 arrivals and departures a day -- through 47 jet gates and 18 commuter gates.The whole complex of counters, ramps, runways, luggage terminals and restaurants (12 of them) is bewildering, massive, overwhelming.
NEWS
By GWINN OWENS | August 30, 1995
We are growing old on this jungle island. It is August 1945 and some of us have been languishing here for 17 months, and a few of these haven't seen their families for, literally, years. Back in May we were envious of the celebrations on the home front of the victory in Europe. Hey, the war isn't over. We're still here out here in the Pacific.Then the A-bombs are dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, incinerating tens of thousands of Japanese, and the long, long war is unexpectedly, unbelievably, hysterically over.
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