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By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,SUN STAFF | October 30, 2001
A sucker for Halloween, our eyes lit up at the City Paper listing for an "Old-Fashioned Seance." None of these New Age seances for us, no sir. Give us a pitch-black room, a red light and the ghost of Harry Houdini ("dead" 75 years) or Elvis any day. We want the earth to move -- or just the table. The listing for the Sunday seance was even a little scary: Due to threats before previous seances, you must call Spiritual Path for the location. We called Robin Cushner, founder and leader of Spiritual Path -- the host of the seance.
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By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | March 26, 2005
There are a number of magical moments in Mum Puppettheatre's Seance at the Theatre Project. A woman gazes into a mirror and, next to her face, sees an image of herself as a little girl. Or, the woman picks up a child's brightly colored ball, and it levitates out of her hand. But the most magical thing about Seance is the spell it weaves. Ethereally performed by five masked actors and a life-sized puppet of the little girl, the hour-long piece is underscored by hauntingly beautiful recorded music by Adam Wernick.
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NEWS
By Jill Hudson Neal and Jill Hudson Neal,SUN STAFF | October 28, 1999
If you're a fan of things that go bump in the night, Dai Andrews is your kind of guy.Andrews, 22, describes himself as a "full-time entertainment medium," a person who gets in touch with spirits of the nether world. He also happens to be a seasoned circus performer, street magician, fire breather, sword swallower and actor.For two days beginning tomorrow, Andrews will put on his most ambitious project: a classic 19th-century-style seance called "Spirit Theater."The production, held in historic Ellicott City's Ellicott Mills shopping arcade on Main Street, will attempt to contact the spirit of Daniel Shea, a tobacco shop owner who was found murdered outside his Main Street business in the late 1800s.
FEATURES
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 29, 2005
HOLLYWOOD - Cheri Woods is no fan of the Doors. Jim Morrison's band was too dark, too druggy. "No, I'm an Elvis nut." Still, Woods has been on a crash course in all things Doors that has included hours of research and even a seance since taking over the two-bedroom Morrison Hotel. "It's $200 a night," Woods chirps, "or $1,000 for a week." She bought the place in late 2003 for $700,000 and only after the transaction was under way did she learn of its rock history. "This is internationally recognized as the last known U.S. residence of Jim Morrison," Woods said of the upstairs rear unit, actually the home of girlfriend Pamela Courson.
FEATURES
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 29, 2005
HOLLYWOOD - Cheri Woods is no fan of the Doors. Jim Morrison's band was too dark, too druggy. "No, I'm an Elvis nut." Still, Woods has been on a crash course in all things Doors that has included hours of research and even a seance since taking over the two-bedroom Morrison Hotel. "It's $200 a night," Woods chirps, "or $1,000 for a week." She bought the place in late 2003 for $700,000 and only after the transaction was under way did she learn of its rock history. "This is internationally recognized as the last known U.S. residence of Jim Morrison," Woods said of the upstairs rear unit, actually the home of girlfriend Pamela Courson.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | March 26, 2005
There are a number of magical moments in Mum Puppettheatre's Seance at the Theatre Project. A woman gazes into a mirror and, next to her face, sees an image of herself as a little girl. Or, the woman picks up a child's brightly colored ball, and it levitates out of her hand. But the most magical thing about Seance is the spell it weaves. Ethereally performed by five masked actors and a life-sized puppet of the little girl, the hour-long piece is underscored by hauntingly beautiful recorded music by Adam Wernick.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 8, 1998
LILY DALE, N.Y. - With its antique furniture and Oriental rugs, the lobby of the Maplewood Hotel looks much like that of countless other country inns. It's the small sign on an unobtrusive column that hints at something less conventional.It asks patrons to refrain, at least in this area, from holding seances. And it gives visitors one of their first clues - but hardly their last - that to stray into Lily Dale, a small, gated community in the far west of the state, is to enter New York's own corner of the twilight zone.
FEATURES
By KNIGHT/RIDDER TRIBUNE | June 23, 2006
Banking on the success of two American remakes of Japanese films, The Ring and The Grudge, Hollywood has at least 16 more remakes of so-called J-Horror films in various stages of acquisition, production and release - a major gamble on a minor genre. During the late '90s, Asian cinema produced a bunch of deliciously surreal and creepy flicks, including Tomie (she's so lovable, you're compelled to kill her) and Phone, about the cell phone from hell. Even as the phenomenon is being promoted in Everytown, U.S.A.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 4, 1997
Colonial Players, the theater on East Street in Annapolis, opens its 49th season tomorrow with Noel Coward's "Blithe Spirit." It is one of three comedies scheduled this season.The others are "My Three Angels" by Sam and Bella Spewack, which runs Jan. 16 through Feb 14, and Larry Gelbart's "Sly Fox," an updated version of Ben Jonson's "Volpone," which runs April 24 through May 23.John Olive's "Voice of the Prairie," a drama about the early days of radio in the Midwest, runs Oct. 17 through Nov. 15, and "Cabaret," the musical set in Germany during Hitler's rise to power, written by John Mastroff with music and lyrics by John Kander and Fred Ebb, runs March 6 through April 4.The theater also has scheduled its annual production of Rick Wade and Dick Gessner's "A Christmas Carol" Dec. 4-7 and Dec. 11-14.
FEATURES
By Nancy Pate | October 30, 1994
Although Anne Rice is the most famous of contemporary vampire novelists, she is by no means the only one.Several hundred vampire novels have been published in the past 25 years, with writers such as Chelsea Yarbro, Fred Saberhagen, P. N. Elrod, Tanith Lee, Lori Herter and Elaine Bergstrom turning out multiple tales. Horrormeisters Stephen King, Peter Straub and Clive Barker have all tried their hand at fictional vampires.Here's a look at some of the latest offerings in the genre:* "The Secret Life of Laszlo, Count Dracula," by Roderick Anscombe (Hyperion, $22.95)
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,SUN STAFF | October 30, 2001
A sucker for Halloween, our eyes lit up at the City Paper listing for an "Old-Fashioned Seance." None of these New Age seances for us, no sir. Give us a pitch-black room, a red light and the ghost of Harry Houdini ("dead" 75 years) or Elvis any day. We want the earth to move -- or just the table. The listing for the Sunday seance was even a little scary: Due to threats before previous seances, you must call Spiritual Path for the location. We called Robin Cushner, founder and leader of Spiritual Path -- the host of the seance.
NEWS
By Jill Hudson Neal and Jill Hudson Neal,SUN STAFF | October 28, 1999
If you're a fan of things that go bump in the night, Dai Andrews is your kind of guy.Andrews, 22, describes himself as a "full-time entertainment medium," a person who gets in touch with spirits of the nether world. He also happens to be a seasoned circus performer, street magician, fire breather, sword swallower and actor.For two days beginning tomorrow, Andrews will put on his most ambitious project: a classic 19th-century-style seance called "Spirit Theater."The production, held in historic Ellicott City's Ellicott Mills shopping arcade on Main Street, will attempt to contact the spirit of Daniel Shea, a tobacco shop owner who was found murdered outside his Main Street business in the late 1800s.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 8, 1998
LILY DALE, N.Y. - With its antique furniture and Oriental rugs, the lobby of the Maplewood Hotel looks much like that of countless other country inns. It's the small sign on an unobtrusive column that hints at something less conventional.It asks patrons to refrain, at least in this area, from holding seances. And it gives visitors one of their first clues - but hardly their last - that to stray into Lily Dale, a small, gated community in the far west of the state, is to enter New York's own corner of the twilight zone.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 11, 1997
Can a comedy first performed in 1941 amuse audiences today? The answer is a resounding yes. On opening night of "Blithe Spirit" at Colonial Players last weekend, the audience appreciated the wit of the Noel Coward show.Charles Condomine, his late wife, Elvira, and his current wife, Ruth, the characters at the center of the show, rank among the wittiest to inhabit any drawing room.Bob Nelson, in his first appearance as a director with Colonial Players, demonstrates that he is at home with the urbane playwright and delivers a first-rate show with top-notch performances.
NEWS
September 29, 1995
IN THE third year of his presidency, Jimmy Carter went up the mountain to Camp David and for an extraordinary ten days had himself lectured to and analyzed by gurus and plain citizens about what was described in those days as the "national malaise."With the benefit of hindsight, it can now be seen that the "malaise" was mainly the result of long gas lines -- that the nation's spirit would lift once the gas lines went away and sunny Ronald Reagan invoked American optimism.Now, in the third year of his presidency, Bill Clinton has also gone introspective.
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