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By Jeff Zrebiec | October 13, 2011
Ravens offensive tackle Michael Oher is plenty busy with the football season, so he hasn't really gotten a chance to see his adoptive brother, Sean Tuohy Jr., play basketball much. But that figures to change soon. Tuohy, a senior Briarcrest Christian School, has committed orally to play basketball at Loyola University beginning next season. “It's big," Oher said. "I get to go to most of the home games, just to see him play. I didn't get a chance to watch him in high school much so I get a chance to watch him a lot more, especially if he's coming up here to play.
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By Matt Bracken and The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2012
After guiding Loyola to its first NCAA tournament appearance since 1994, life has been undeniably good for Greyhounds coach Jimmy Patsos . Between speaking engagements, playing in charity golf tournaments and making the occasional radio or television appearance, Patsos has been a busy man since the Greyhounds fell to Ohio State in the second round of the NCAA tournament. But basketball has remained the No. 1 priority, and there's plenty of optimism on Cold Spring Lane for another big year.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | July 16, 2010
Leigh Anne and Sean Tuohy, the ebullient Memphis, Tenn., couple who made Michael Oher their third child, enrolled him at Ole Miss, then cheered him on when he became a Baltimore Raven, have collaborated on their own version of the story that became the book and the hit movie "The Blind Side. " With Washington Post columnist Sally Jenkins, they've written "In a Heartbeat: Sharing the Power of Cheerful Giving. " Their book aims to bring the Michael Oher miracle off the big screen and back down to real life — and make sure that its message won't get lost.
SPORTS
Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | July 8, 2012
The relationship between Michael Oher and Sean Tuohy Jr. has - like Tuohy himself - grown dramatically in the 10 years since Oher was brought by Tuohy's family into their home in the leafy suburbs of Memphis. If those early years became the genesis of a best-selling book and a hit movie that documented Oher's transformation into a college football star at Mississippi and the No. 1 pick of the Ravens in 2009, this year takes the brothers' relationship to another place. In Baltimore, call it The Other Side.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | October 13, 2011
Moviegoers who saw Ravens offensive tackle Michael Oher's saga depicted in the "The Blind Side" recall Sean Tuohy Jr. as the future football star's rambunctious little brother who interrogated big-time college coaches when they came to the family's Memphis, Tenn., home on recruiting trips. Tuohy is now a senior at the same private high school where Oher was discovered, and a pretty good basketball player - good enough to earn a scholarship at Loyola University, where Tuohy has committed orally to play beginning next season.
SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,ken.murray@baltsun.com | November 18, 2009
At the end of a game punctuated by at least three disconcerting injuries, the Ravens' Ray Lewis asked the NFL to drop the hammer on Cleveland Browns quarterback Brady Quinn for his low bridge on Terrell Suggs. Lewis, who drew a $25,000 fine from the league for two incidents in the Ravens' Oct 11 game against the Cincinnati Bengals, said the hit on Suggs after a third-quarter interception was a dirty play. "Heck yeah, it was a cheap shot, when you're running down and you're looking at the quarterback going at somebody's knees who doesn't even have the ball," Lewis said after Baltimore's 16-0 win over the Browns on Monday night.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow | michael.sragow@baltsun.com and Baltimore Sun reporter | August 28, 2009
W hen Michael Oher takes the field as a Baltimore Raven this fall, a national audience of readers and moviegoers even bigger than the Ravens' fan base will be cheering for him. The amazing story behind his rise to football stardom will fill the bestseller shelves at bookstores on Oct. 12, with a new edition of Michael Lewis' powerhouse piece of nonfiction "The Blind Side." And if all goes according to plan, it will also pack movie theaters on Nov. 20, when writer-director John Lee Hancock's movie version hits theaters, starring newcomer Quinton Aron as Oher and Sandra Bullock and Tim McGraw as Leigh Anne and Sean Tuohy - the wealthy, white, conservative, evangelical couple who devoted themselves to the happiness and success of "Big Mike," a black kid from the meanest streets of Memphis, Tenn.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | November 20, 2009
"The Blind Side" has a supremely satisfying wrap-up: photos of football player Michael Oher with his adoptive family and the footage of his selection by the Baltimore Ravens in the NFL draft. There's nothing like that tingle of authenticity coming after a resonant fact-based story. Without restraint or subtlety, but with a lot of heart and energy, this movie tells a real-life tall tale - make that Big and Tall - en route to these closing attractions. Author Michael Lewis titled one chapter "Freak of Nurture" in his terrific nonfiction source book "The Blind Side: Evolution of a Game."
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | August 28, 2009
When Michael Oher takes the field as a Baltimore Raven this fall, a national audience of readers and moviegoers even bigger than the Ravens' fan base will be cheering for him. The amazing story behind his rise to football stardom will fill the nonfiction shelves at bookstores on Oct. 12, with a new edition of Michael Lewis' powerhouse piece of nonfiction "The Blind Side." And if all goes according to plan, it will also pack movie theaters on Nov. 20, when writer-director John Lee Hancock's movie version hits theaters, starring newcomer Quinton Aron as Oher and Sandra Bullock and Tim McGraw as Leigh Anne and Sean Tuohy - the wealthy, white, conservative, evangelical couple who devoted themselves to the happiness and success of "Big Mike," a black kid from the meanest streets of Memphis, Tenn.
NEWS
By Dan Connolly and Dan Connolly,Dan.connolly@baltsun.com | November 16, 2009
Ravens offensive lineman Michael Oher shrugs his massive shoulders when asked about his life story - one considered so compelling it's the subject of the movie "The Blind Side" scheduled to open nationwide this week. It's a Hollywood version of Oher's incredible journey from destitute, uneducated Memphis teen to college graduate and millionaire starting right tackle for the Ravens. Based on Michael Lewis' best-selling book of the same name, the Warner Bros. movie highlights Oher's close relationship with the rich white family that helped change his life.
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec | October 13, 2011
Ravens offensive tackle Michael Oher is plenty busy with the football season, so he hasn't really gotten a chance to see his adoptive brother, Sean Tuohy Jr., play basketball much. But that figures to change soon. Tuohy, a senior Briarcrest Christian School, has committed orally to play basketball at Loyola University beginning next season. “It's big," Oher said. "I get to go to most of the home games, just to see him play. I didn't get a chance to watch him in high school much so I get a chance to watch him a lot more, especially if he's coming up here to play.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | October 13, 2011
Moviegoers who saw Ravens offensive tackle Michael Oher's saga depicted in the "The Blind Side" recall Sean Tuohy Jr. as the future football star's rambunctious little brother who interrogated big-time college coaches when they came to the family's Memphis, Tenn., home on recruiting trips. Tuohy is now a senior at the same private high school where Oher was discovered, and a pretty good basketball player - good enough to earn a scholarship at Loyola University, where Tuohy has committed orally to play beginning next season.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | July 16, 2010
Leigh Anne and Sean Tuohy, the ebullient Memphis, Tenn., couple who made Michael Oher their third child, enrolled him at Ole Miss, then cheered him on when he became a Baltimore Raven, have collaborated on their own version of the story that became the book and the hit movie "The Blind Side. " With Washington Post columnist Sally Jenkins, they've written "In a Heartbeat: Sharing the Power of Cheerful Giving. " Their book aims to bring the Michael Oher miracle off the big screen and back down to real life — and make sure that its message won't get lost.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | November 20, 2009
"The Blind Side" has a supremely satisfying wrap-up: photos of football player Michael Oher with his adoptive family and the footage of his selection by the Baltimore Ravens in the NFL draft. There's nothing like that tingle of authenticity coming after a resonant fact-based story. Without restraint or subtlety, but with a lot of heart and energy, this movie tells a real-life tall tale - make that Big and Tall - en route to these closing attractions. Author Michael Lewis titled one chapter "Freak of Nurture" in his terrific nonfiction source book "The Blind Side: Evolution of a Game."
SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,ken.murray@baltsun.com | November 18, 2009
At the end of a game punctuated by at least three disconcerting injuries, the Ravens' Ray Lewis asked the NFL to drop the hammer on Cleveland Browns quarterback Brady Quinn for his low bridge on Terrell Suggs. Lewis, who drew a $25,000 fine from the league for two incidents in the Ravens' Oct 11 game against the Cincinnati Bengals, said the hit on Suggs after a third-quarter interception was a dirty play. "Heck yeah, it was a cheap shot, when you're running down and you're looking at the quarterback going at somebody's knees who doesn't even have the ball," Lewis said after Baltimore's 16-0 win over the Browns on Monday night.
NEWS
By Dan Connolly and Dan Connolly,Dan.connolly@baltsun.com | November 16, 2009
Ravens offensive lineman Michael Oher shrugs his massive shoulders when asked about his life story - one considered so compelling it's the subject of the movie "The Blind Side" scheduled to open nationwide this week. It's a Hollywood version of Oher's incredible journey from destitute, uneducated Memphis teen to college graduate and millionaire starting right tackle for the Ravens. Based on Michael Lewis' best-selling book of the same name, the Warner Bros. movie highlights Oher's close relationship with the rich white family that helped change his life.
SPORTS
By Matt Bracken and The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2012
After guiding Loyola to its first NCAA tournament appearance since 1994, life has been undeniably good for Greyhounds coach Jimmy Patsos . Between speaking engagements, playing in charity golf tournaments and making the occasional radio or television appearance, Patsos has been a busy man since the Greyhounds fell to Ohio State in the second round of the NCAA tournament. But basketball has remained the No. 1 priority, and there's plenty of optimism on Cold Spring Lane for another big year.
SPORTS
Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | July 8, 2012
The relationship between Michael Oher and Sean Tuohy Jr. has - like Tuohy himself - grown dramatically in the 10 years since Oher was brought by Tuohy's family into their home in the leafy suburbs of Memphis. If those early years became the genesis of a best-selling book and a hit movie that documented Oher's transformation into a college football star at Mississippi and the No. 1 pick of the Ravens in 2009, this year takes the brothers' relationship to another place. In Baltimore, call it The Other Side.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | August 28, 2009
When Michael Oher takes the field as a Baltimore Raven this fall, a national audience of readers and moviegoers even bigger than the Ravens' fan base will be cheering for him. The amazing story behind his rise to football stardom will fill the nonfiction shelves at bookstores on Oct. 12, with a new edition of Michael Lewis' powerhouse piece of nonfiction "The Blind Side." And if all goes according to plan, it will also pack movie theaters on Nov. 20, when writer-director John Lee Hancock's movie version hits theaters, starring newcomer Quinton Aron as Oher and Sandra Bullock and Tim McGraw as Leigh Anne and Sean Tuohy - the wealthy, white, conservative, evangelical couple who devoted themselves to the happiness and success of "Big Mike," a black kid from the meanest streets of Memphis, Tenn.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow | michael.sragow@baltsun.com and Baltimore Sun reporter | August 28, 2009
W hen Michael Oher takes the field as a Baltimore Raven this fall, a national audience of readers and moviegoers even bigger than the Ravens' fan base will be cheering for him. The amazing story behind his rise to football stardom will fill the bestseller shelves at bookstores on Oct. 12, with a new edition of Michael Lewis' powerhouse piece of nonfiction "The Blind Side." And if all goes according to plan, it will also pack movie theaters on Nov. 20, when writer-director John Lee Hancock's movie version hits theaters, starring newcomer Quinton Aron as Oher and Sandra Bullock and Tim McGraw as Leigh Anne and Sean Tuohy - the wealthy, white, conservative, evangelical couple who devoted themselves to the happiness and success of "Big Mike," a black kid from the meanest streets of Memphis, Tenn.
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