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By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | April 28, 2012
Angela Tiburzi, who made men's suits for four decades, died of cancer April 25 at the Stella Maris Hospice. She was 86 and lived in Rosedale. Born Angela DiMarco in Baltimore and raised on Highlandtown's Eaton Street, she attended Our Lady of Pompei School. She met her future husband, Salvatore A. Tiburzi, later a Baltimore Police Department sergeant, as a child in the neighborhood where they both lived. They married shortly after World War II. The couple lived on Clinton Street in Highlandtown and later moved to Caradoc Drive in Rosedale.
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By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | June 21, 2014
"To day has bin a memorable day," Emilie Frances Davis wrote in a miniature diary on Jan. 1, 1863, the date the Emancipation Proclamation became law. "I thank God I have bin here to see it. The day was religiously observed, all the churches were open. We had quite a Jubilee in the evening. I went to Joness to a party, had a very blessest time. " Davis, a 21-year-old seamstress and freeborn black woman living in Philadelphia, was jotting down her feelings about the event that came to be known as Jubilee Day in one of three pocket diaries she kept from 1863 to 1865 during the height of the Civil War. The diaries, which somehow avoided destruction, are being published now for the first time.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | October 19, 2013
Emily Velelli, who survived the Holocaust after being hidden by gentiles in war-torn Greece, then immigrated to Baltimore, where she worked as a seamstress, died Tuesday of breast cancer at her Pikesville home. She was 100. The daughter of Jacob Osmou, a Hebrew educator, and Regina Osmou, a homemaker, Emily Osmou was born on the island of Corfu, which at the time had a large Jewish population. The family later moved to the Peloponnesian port city of Patras, where she was sent to a private Roman Catholic girls school.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2014
Gulay U. Lannon, a homemaker who enjoyed playing the piano and singing, died June 7 of cancer at her daughter's Rodgers Forge home. She was 75. The former Gulay Ulular was born and raised in Samsun, Turkey, where she graduated from a French-American high school. She met her future husband, Cormac Martin Lannon, while he was serving with the U.S. Air Force in Turkey. They were married in 1963 and later settled in Mount Washington. Her husband, a civil engineer who retired as head of construction management for the city Department of Public Works, died in 2009.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | January 20, 2014
Margaret Cecelia Zimmerman, a member of one of the oldest families in Towson who was an accomplished family seamstress, died of complications from gastric disease and hypertension Jan. 3 at Manor Care Ruxton. The North Baltimore resident was 101. Born Margaret Cecelia Bosley, she was the daughter of Aquilla Cardiff Tagert Bosley, a house painter whose family owned and operated Bosley's Hotel, a structure that once stood on the site of the old Hutzler's Towson department store. Her mother, Maria Eliza Hahn, had worked in a family dry-goods store in the old Towson business district.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 22, 2011
Mammie Lee Davis, a retired professional seamstress and tax preparer, died Saturday of renal failure at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. She was 78. Mammie Lee Benjamin was born and raised in Florence, S.C. She was a 1951 graduate of Wilson High School. She worked for Wentworth Manufacturing in Florence, and in 1955, she married Sam Davis Jr. Two years later, the couple settled in Baltimore, and Mrs. Davis went to work as a professional seamstress at Raleigh Manufacturers Inc. on Wicomico Street.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rassmussen | September 28, 2009
Alverta E. Anderson, a seamstress and a former grocery store owner, died of cardiac arrest Thursday at Maryland General Hospital. The longtime North Mount Street resident was 91. Alverta Edith Brown, the daughter of a factory worker and housekeeper, was born and raised in Trenton, N.J., where she attended city public schools. Mrs. Anderson moved to Baltimore in the late 1930s, where she worked as a seamstress in the city's former garment district on West Paca Street. In 1969, she opened Alverta's Grocery Store on North Gilmor at Presstman streets, which she owned and operated until selling it about a decade later.
NEWS
January 28, 2006
Christine W. Strakna, a homemaker and seamstress, died of a heart attack Wednesday at Howard County General Hospital. The longtime Columbia resident was 80. She was born Christine Wanda Gellert in Wierzbo, Poland, and moved with her family to Brooklyn, N.Y. They later returned to Poland during the 1930s and were trapped there during World War II when the Nazis occupied their country. In 1946, she moved to Chicago, where she worked as a secretary. She married Edwin Raymond Strakna, a federal government translator, in 1952 and the couple moved to Washington.
NEWS
April 19, 1991
Hilda M. Schnitker, a Towson seamstress who once owned dress shops on New York's swank Fifth Avenue and Baltimore's Saratoga Street, died of cancer March 16 at the Manor Care Nursing Home. She was 85.Mrs. Schnitker spent most of her life hunched over a sewing machine, turning out almost anything that could be made with a bit of fabric, thread and loving care, according to friends and relatives."Hilda and that old factory Singer were inseparable. She used to make that thing sing for her -- zip, zip, zzzip," said Genevieve Jones, Mrs. Schnitker's longtime friend.
NEWS
June 20, 2004
Marie Tumminello, a retired seamstress and homemaker, died Wednesday of congestive heart failure at Ivy Hall Nursing Home in Middle River. A resident of Belair-Edison for many years, she was 92 and most recently lived with a grandson in Rosedale. Marie Vitale was born in Sicily and moved to East Baltimore with her family when she was 8 years old. After attending city public schools and raising a family, she made and tailored men's suits at the old Lebow Bros. clothing factory at Oliver Street and Guilford Avenue.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | January 20, 2014
Margaret Cecelia Zimmerman, a member of one of the oldest families in Towson who was an accomplished family seamstress, died of complications from gastric disease and hypertension Jan. 3 at Manor Care Ruxton. The North Baltimore resident was 101. Born Margaret Cecelia Bosley, she was the daughter of Aquilla Cardiff Tagert Bosley, a house painter whose family owned and operated Bosley's Hotel, a structure that once stood on the site of the old Hutzler's Towson department store. Her mother, Maria Eliza Hahn, had worked in a family dry-goods store in the old Towson business district.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | October 19, 2013
Emily Velelli, who survived the Holocaust after being hidden by gentiles in war-torn Greece, then immigrated to Baltimore, where she worked as a seamstress, died Tuesday of breast cancer at her Pikesville home. She was 100. The daughter of Jacob Osmou, a Hebrew educator, and Regina Osmou, a homemaker, Emily Osmou was born on the island of Corfu, which at the time had a large Jewish population. The family later moved to the Peloponnesian port city of Patras, where she was sent to a private Roman Catholic girls school.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | June 8, 2013
Soon after a massive tornado devastated Moore, Okla., last month, a Linthicum seamstress leaped into action, formulating a plan to help the victims. Kathy Furth began reaching out to thread-savvy friends from her parish and a local sewing organization to gauge interest. She asked them: Do you want to join forces to make clothes for children who lost everything in the disaster? The positive responses to her inquiries were overwhelming, she said. "It just spread like crazy," said Furth, owner of Sew Many Seams, a business that specializes in creating one-of-a-kind liturgical vestments.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 6, 2012
Cristina F. Manelli, an Italian immigrant who designed and sewed clothes for clients, family and friends and later created a line of costume jewelry, died Wednesday of renal failure at St. Elizabeth Rehabilitation Center in Southwest Baltimore. The longtime Catonsville resident was 96. The daughter of a farmer and a homemaker, Cristina Flagelli was born and raised in Teramo, Italy, where she was trained as a seamstress and embroiderer. There, she met her future husband, Luigi "Gino" Manelli, an artist who had been born in Philadelphia to Italian immigrants.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 11, 2012
Dolores Jane "Dollie" Epstein, a former office worker and master seamstress, died Monday of multiple organ failure at her Lutherville home. She was 79. The daughter of an accountant and a homemaker, the former Dolores Jane "Dollie" Moeller was born in Baltimore and raised on Gibbons Avenue in Hamilton. She was a graduate of Clara Barton Vocational High School, where she studied to become a master seamstress. After her marriage to Robert I. Epstein, a mechanical engineer, in 1959, the coupled settled on Tunbridge Road in Homeland, where they raised their seven children.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | April 28, 2012
Angela Tiburzi, who made men's suits for four decades, died of cancer April 25 at the Stella Maris Hospice. She was 86 and lived in Rosedale. Born Angela DiMarco in Baltimore and raised on Highlandtown's Eaton Street, she attended Our Lady of Pompei School. She met her future husband, Salvatore A. Tiburzi, later a Baltimore Police Department sergeant, as a child in the neighborhood where they both lived. They married shortly after World War II. The couple lived on Clinton Street in Highlandtown and later moved to Caradoc Drive in Rosedale.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,Sun Staff Writer | March 31, 1995
Martina Olandrous Drummond Tyler, a former schoolteacher and seamstress and keeper of her family's history, died Monday in her sleep at Inns of Evergreen Northwest Nursing Home in Baltimore. She was 103."She was the oral historian of our family and focus of our family reunions, which she attended up until several years ago," said a great-nephew, William H. Britt of Baltimore, a retired city school principal.Her forebears "were slaves that came from Africa to the Eastern Shore of Virginia before the Revolutionary War and worked on the Finney Plantation near Onancock, where she grew up," Mr. Britt said.
NEWS
August 31, 2002
Dorothy M.W. Krolicki, a retired seamstress and former Severna Park resident, died of pneumonia Aug. 23 in Ocoee, Fla. She was 90. Born Dorothy M. Wojciechowski in Baltimore, she left school early to help support her family and was a cannery worker in the 1920s. For many years, she was a seamstress in Baltimore's garment district near Lombard and Paca streets. She retired in 1983 and moved from Severna Park to Winter Garden, Fla., in 1997. She was a watercolorist and accomplished needleworker.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | April 19, 2012
Barbara Ann Lawson, a homemaker, gospel musician and retired garment worker, died of cancer Sunday at Sinai Hospital. She was 68 and lived in the Pimlico section of Northwest Baltimore. Born Barbara Ann Tillie in Washington, she moved to Baltimore as a child and attended Clifton Park Junior High School. A seamstress, she formerly worked at the old Raleigh and London Fog clothing firms. She also worked at the Kmart on Wabash Avenue and was an Avon cosmetics saleswoman. "She was very devoted to her grandchildren," said her husband, Sidney Anthony Lawson, a bartender.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | June 22, 2011
Mammie Lee Davis, a retired professional seamstress and tax preparer, died Saturday of renal failure at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. She was 78. Mammie Lee Benjamin was born and raised in Florence, S.C. She was a 1951 graduate of Wilson High School. She worked for Wentworth Manufacturing in Florence, and in 1955, she married Sam Davis Jr. Two years later, the couple settled in Baltimore, and Mrs. Davis went to work as a professional seamstress at Raleigh Manufacturers Inc. on Wicomico Street.
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