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By Gene Austin and Gene Austin,Knight-Ridder News Service | February 15, 1992
Q: I have a heavy vinyl wallpaper in my kitchen. It is coming loose in several places at the seams. I tried pasting the seams, but it didn't work. Any suggestions short of removing the wallpaper?A: Wallpaper seams that peel away from the wall are often very springy, and special methods might be needed to keep them flat.Since most modern wall coverings are not paper, but vinyl, the best bet is to use a special vinyl adhesive. Adhesives designed for repairs are sold in toothpaste-size tubes at many wallpaper stores and home centers.
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NEWS
By Joel Brinkley | January 28, 2013
Distracted by the deadly violence in Mali and Algeria, no one seems to be paying adequate attention to the tragicomedy under way in Pakistan. This matters because recent events demonstrate without equivocation that Pakistan is an utterly failed state -- but one that possesses nuclear weapons. The country is tumbling down the abyss. Where else could a fundamentalist Muslim cleric who lives in Canada draw tens of thousands of fans to a rally calling for dissolution of the government -- speaking from inside a shipping container with a bulletproof window?
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NEWS
By Andrew C. Revkin and Andrew C. Revkin,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 25, 2002
Fires are burning in thousands of underground coal seams from Pennsylvania to Mongolia, releasing toxic gases, adding millions of tons of heat-trapping carbon dioxide to the atmosphere and baking the earth until vegetation shrivels and the land sinks. Scientists and government agencies are starting to use heat-sensing satellites to map the fires and try new ways to extinguish them. But in many instances - particularly in Asia - they are so widespread and stubborn that miners simply work around the flames.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | April 30, 2012
As the Orioles went 5-1 on this week's six-game homestand, it's been an eventful week for right-handed reliever Pedro Strop. Earlier this week, with closer Jim Johnson hospitalized with food poisoning, Strop had the opportunity to step into the ninth-inning role and earned his first two career big-league saves on back-to-back nights Tuesday and Wednesday against Toronto. Strop, who has spent most of the season pitching in an eighth-inning set-up role, thrived under the late-inning pressure, throwing 98-mph two-seam sinking fastball that cuts off the corners of the plate.
FEATURES
By Steven Pratt and Steven Pratt,Chicago Tribune | August 24, 1994
First, let's answer this nagging question: What's the difference between a muskmelon and a cantaloupe?They're both ivory-yellow, solid and wrapped in fishnet rinds, but one's got seams, right?Wrong, or at least not exactly, says Chuck Voigt, a vegetable specialist at the University of Illinois in Urbana-Champaign. The melon without seams is what many people call a cantaloupe, but technically it's not a cantaloupe, he says. It's really a muskmelon without seams, called a western muskmelon, which is different from an eastern muskmelon with seams, which is what most people call a muskmelon.
BUSINESS
February 14, 2008
Foundation Coal Shares in the Linthicum Heights-based mining firm rose $1.82 to $55.29. Foundation announced the acquisition of a 49 percent stake in a Pennsylvania firm that drills for gas in coalbed seams.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | November 2, 1995
The Rouse Co. pledged $300,000 this week toward the $9 million restoration of the Constellation, the historic but deteriorating 1854 sloop of war that long has been the centerpiece of Baltimore's Inner Harbor.The Columbia-based company's gift to the Constellation Foundation launches a campaign to raise $3 million from corporations, philanthropies and other private donors. The warship's board hopes to raise most of that by spring to allow the Civil War relic to be towed to a Locust Point dry dock for two years of repairs.
NEWS
By Allison Kaplan and Allison Kaplan,KNIGHT RIDDER/ TRIBUNE | November 9, 2003
Let's get one thing straight: If you're spending $200 on a pair of jeans, it's not for durability. Long before stonewashing and distressing and spandex, basic Levi's were the clothing of choice of coal miners. These days, the most rigorous job called upon the average blue jeans is a spin on the dance floor. As denim has morphed from staple into style statement, the prices have climbed to jaw-dropping proportions. And they show no sign of stopping. Earl Jeans, once exclusive at $120, seem almost affordable compared with some styles by Diesel that now top $200.
FEATURES
By Barry Meier and Barry Meier,N.Y. Times News Service | November 21, 1990
Parkas, shells and other rugged outdoor wear are supposed to be part of the simple life. But increasingly, buying such clothing is anything but simple.Tags boasting of various fabric treatments read like primers in fluid mechanics.More and more synthetics, all competitors to down, are on the scene, many with strange-sounding names.And with some specially treated shells priced at $400 or more, it's not too hard for a bewildered shopper to end up buying a garment more suited to an assault on Mount Everest than a weekend walk.
SPORTS
By Buster Olney and Buster Olney,Sun Staff Writer | April 5, 1995
SARASOTA, Fla. -- Somebody asked Alan Mills, who yesterday became the first Orioles player to appear in camp, if he had thought the strike ever would end."Have you seen that All Sport commercial with Shaq?" Mills said of the drink endorsed by Orlando Magic center Shaquille O'Neal. "I was thinking [during the strike] that's how people would think back on baseball. 'Remember that game, baseball, they used to play with bats and balls and they ran around the bases . . . ?' "Mills was grinning broadly, sweating through his jersey after throwing for Orioles manager Phil Regan and the coaching staff for 15 minutes.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg and Special to The Baltimore Sun | April 4, 2010
L ike a long crescendo, the music at St. John Baptist Church built gradually upon itself last Sunday as four hand-clapping, palm-raising songs lifted the congregation higher and higher. Worshippers in the new $10 million brick-and-stucco building on 10 acres at Route 175 and Tamar Drive swayed and sang along with the male chorus' version of "I'll Be a Witness," which inspired many in the pews to rise. One woman got up frequently and gleefully tapped her own tambourine. "This is the day that … what?"
BUSINESS
February 14, 2008
Foundation Coal Shares in the Linthicum Heights-based mining firm rose $1.82 to $55.29. Foundation announced the acquisition of a 49 percent stake in a Pennsylvania firm that drills for gas in coalbed seams.
NEWS
By MATTHEW HAY BROWN and MATTHEW HAY BROWN,SUN REPORTER | April 28, 2006
Older Catholics from the area might remember the winged figures that once flanked the marble altar at the Baltimore Basilica. The pair stood sentinel through the celebration of the Eucharist for more than a century of Sundays before they were removed in the 1940s. Now, after decades in storage, the angels are returning to America's oldest cathedral. At a pair of workshops in Hampden, local craftsmen are peeling off 17 layers of paint from the figures, repairing cracks in the original basswood and resculpting missing parts to restore them to their 19th-century appearance.
NEWS
By CASSANDRA A. FORTIN and CASSANDRA A. FORTIN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 11, 2005
After spending months planning, designing and repairing more than 100 costumes for the Harford Ballet Company's production of The Nutcracker, the moment of truth arrives for Lori Sbarra. As lead seamstress for the ballet company, Sbarra is confident that the dancer playing Clara's mother will look resplendent in a shiny silver and black party gown, and that the jacket worn by the performer portraying the prince will fit just right. She has no doubt that her latest creation, a pink peppermint costume for the lead Russian dancer, will dazzle.
NEWS
By Allison Kaplan and Allison Kaplan,KNIGHT RIDDER/ TRIBUNE | November 9, 2003
Let's get one thing straight: If you're spending $200 on a pair of jeans, it's not for durability. Long before stonewashing and distressing and spandex, basic Levi's were the clothing of choice of coal miners. These days, the most rigorous job called upon the average blue jeans is a spin on the dance floor. As denim has morphed from staple into style statement, the prices have climbed to jaw-dropping proportions. And they show no sign of stopping. Earl Jeans, once exclusive at $120, seem almost affordable compared with some styles by Diesel that now top $200.
SPORTS
By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | July 26, 2003
TORONTO - If Jason Johnson's career with the Orioles is winding down, he'll want to fast-forward past one play last night that might have cost him a win. Center fielder Luis Matos would be wise to burn the entire tape. A throwing error by Matos allowed pinch runner Reed Johnson to score the tie-breaking run in the seventh inning, and the Toronto Blue Jays took advantage of a questionable decision and strange hop to defeat the Orioles, 5-3, before 17,095 at SkyDome. Jason Johnson is 1-8 lifetime against the Blue Jays, his only win coming July 3 at Camden Yards.
NEWS
By MATTHEW HAY BROWN and MATTHEW HAY BROWN,SUN REPORTER | April 28, 2006
Older Catholics from the area might remember the winged figures that once flanked the marble altar at the Baltimore Basilica. The pair stood sentinel through the celebration of the Eucharist for more than a century of Sundays before they were removed in the 1940s. Now, after decades in storage, the angels are returning to America's oldest cathedral. At a pair of workshops in Hampden, local craftsmen are peeling off 17 layers of paint from the figures, repairing cracks in the original basswood and resculpting missing parts to restore them to their 19th-century appearance.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | July 2, 2000
When the air gets so heavy and dirty that it sits on the Baltimore skyline like an old wool Army blanket, I start thinking about camping. I am thinking about it right now. This past week was just a calling card for the humid weeks of summer ahead. Time to plan a trip to the hills of Pennsylvania or Virginia, or the mountains of northern New England. Sure, you can spend on camping gear the equivalent of the gross national product of some small nation. You'll look wicked cool setting up under the trees with stuff from The North Face or Sierra Designs.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | February 26, 2003
The garment in the picture looks at once flimsy and firm. The top half is sheer, gossamer lace; the bottom, beginning just below the breasts, is highly structured, with long side panels descending over the hips. Playwright Lynn Nottage stumbled upon this image of an old-fashioned wedding corset while doing research for a new play at the New York Public Library. She copied the picture, took it home and taped it to her computer. "I was thumbing through books on lingerie and suddenly opened to this page with this beautiful silk wedding corset embroidered with orange blossoms, and it was dated 1905, and I thought, `How perfect,'" she says.
NEWS
April 16, 2002
LATE LAST November, the forces of Gen. Rashid Dostum called a cease-fire in their sporadic fighting against the Taliban in Kunduz province in northern Afghanistan, long enough so that the two supposed enemies could work side by side looting the Kunduz Public Hospital of all its supplies. Then General Dostum's men fled before the advance of their alleged allies of the Northern Alliance, while all but the stupidest Taliban fighters melted away into the population. The Northern Alliance soldiers, shocked to find the hospital so thoroughly smashed, did the only thing they could think of - they dragged the doctors away.
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