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September 10, 1990
Today's scheduled ceremonial opening of the Seagirt Marine Terminal has been postponed until tomorrow because of engine problems with the first ship that was to have docked there.Mediterranean Shipping Co.'s ship, the Rafaela S., had planned on steaming from the Port of New York to Baltimore through the Chesapeake & Delaware Canal, a shortcut that connects the Delaware and Chesapeake bays. It will instead make the trip around the Delmarva Peninsula and up the Chesapeake Bay, arriving at Baltimore late tonight.
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BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | October 24, 2013
The port of Baltimore's public marine terminals have earned a positive security assessment from the Coast Guard for the sixth year in a row, the Maryland Port Administration announced Thursday. The port's public terminals include Seagirt, Dundalk, North and South Locust Point, Cruise Maryland, Fairfield and Masonville. The port also received a positive evaluation by representatives from the European Commission "conducting a review of the United States' enforcement of the International Ship and Port Facility Security Code," the port administration said.
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BUSINESS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,Evening Sun Staff | September 11, 1990
After 10 years of planning and construction, the Seagirt Marine Terminal today hosted its first ship -- a development hailed by one optimistic port leader as the beginning of a renaissance for the Port of Baltimore."
BUSINESS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | July 2, 2013
The port of Baltimore has applied for a $10 million federal grant — to be matched by a state grant of $19.5 million — to expand rail access and export storage at Fairfield Marine Terminal and to widen the access channel to Seagirt Marine Terminal. The proposal, which Maryland Port Administration commissioners approved Tuesday, would tap into a $473.8 million pot called TIGER 5 funds that the U.S. Department of Transportation will distribute this fall. Plans include dredging the approach to Seagirt to handle the widest ships in the world and using some of that material to fill a World War II-vintage basin at Fairfield to create 7.6 acres for car and heavy equipment storage.
BUSINESS
By John H. Gormley Jr | October 17, 1990
Maryland officials sang the praises of the port of Baltimore's new Seagirt Marine Terminal to maritime industry executives yesterday.But representatives of the competing ports of Virginia retorted that Seagirt, though it may set off a rate war, won't change the balance of power in the struggle for supremacy among mid-Atlantic ports.At a conference in Baltimore on international trade and transportation, Brendan W. O'Malley, executive director of the Maryland Port Administration, told the audience that Seagirt is "as far-reaching in its design as any [terminal]
BUSINESS
By John H. Gormley Jr | October 25, 1990
As about 1,000 people looked on yesterday afternoon, state Comptroller Louis L. Goldstein gingerly knocked a champagne bottle against the yellow ladder of a towering blue container crane at dedication ceremonies for Seagirt Marine Terminal.Screwing up his resolve when the bottle refused to break the first time, Mr. Goldstein gave the ladder a good whack.This time the bottle smashed, splattering droplets of bubbly liquid over the pants and shoes of Isaac Shafran, the Maryland Port Administration's director of development.
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,Sun Staff Writer | October 8, 1994
The port of Baltimore is extending hours of gate operation for truckers at Seagirt Marine Terminal, making it the only terminal on the East Coast to keep its gates open to midnight, according to port officials.Under an agreement reached with the International Longshoremen's Association, the operating hours at the state's ultra-modern terminal will be extended by six hours, from 7 a.m. to midnight, rather than closing at 6 p.m.Gov. William Donald Schaefer noted in a statement Thursday that the extra hours mean that truckers using Seagirt will have time to deliver or pick up their containers at the end of the workday.
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,michael.dresser@baltsun.com | April 16, 2009
The Maryland Port Administration is inviting private companies interested in leasing and running the Seagirt Marine Terminal to submit their qualifications to become a partner in the venture, officials said Wednesday. The move is another step toward finding a private partner to invest more than $100 million in capital improvements at the Southeast Baltimore terminal. Last fall, the MPA hired a consulting firm to help it draw up plans for the venture. The state is calculating that it will need an influx of private money to pay for construction of a 50-foot berth at Seagirt in time for the 2014 completion of a wider, deeper Panama Canal.
BUSINESS
By John H. Gormley Jr | May 9, 1991
Puerto Rico Marine Management Inc., the sixth-largest steamship line by cargo volume in the port of Baltimore, has agreed to become a tenant at the state's new Seagirt Marine Terminal.PRMMI will join Mediterranean Shipping Co. and Evergreen Marine Corp. at Seagirt, the $250 million facility that opened in September."This is one more strong signal we made the right decision to build it," Maryland Transportation Secretary O. James Lighthizer said yesterday.The six-year lease will give PRMMI 20 acres at the 265-acre facility just west of Dundalk Marine Terminal.
BUSINESS
By John H. Gormley Jr | November 16, 1990
Yangming Line, a Taiwanese steamship company that had been a prime candidate for the state's new Seagirt Marine Terminal, will not be bringing its ships to Baltimore.Yangming has announced a new schedule for its ships on the East Coast, which does not include Baltimore even though the line has decided to drop Norfolk, Va.In the spring, the line will begin a space-sharing arrangement with Hanjin Shipping Co., a South Korean line. East Coast ports of call for the ships of the two lines will be Savannah, Ga., Wilmington, N.C. and New York.
BUSINESS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | May 8, 2013
He didn't get down on one knee, but Christopher Lee wooed his wife with a skyscraping crane she literally could call her own at the dedication of the port of Baltimore's berth capable of handling the world's largest cargo ships. As founder of Highstar Capital, the Ruxton resident provided the financial backing for a $105 million expansion at Seagirt Marine Terminal to make Baltimore one of only two East Coast ports — the other is Norfolk, Va. — ready to handle the larger ships that could pass through the widened Panama Canal in 2015.
BUSINESS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | February 14, 2013
The manufacturers of Asia just got a lot closer to Baltimore. Four massive cranes at the Seagirt Marine Terminal began writing the next chapter in the region's maritime history Thursday morning as they started unloading a 981-foot cargo ship laden with containers onto waiting trucks. The cranes are the most visible symbols of a $1.3 billion public-private partnership between the Port of Baltimore and Ports America Chesapeake that allowed the expansion of Seagirt to handle the world's largest ships and gives the facility a leg up on almost every port from Maine to Florida.
NEWS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | October 15, 2012
A major gateway to Baltimore's port is getting a $44 million upgrade and commercial trucks will be required to use specific streets in Southeast Baltimore to alleviate congestion under a plan to be announced Tuesday morning by Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake. Preparation work on the Southeast Road Reconstruction Program has begun and all work is expected to be completed by fall 2014. Rawlings-Blake called the port "one of the pillars of growth" in the city and said the upgrades will not only help the maritime industry expand but will make streets safer for motorists, pedestrians and bicyclists.
BUSINESS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | May 27, 2012
About two weeks from now, a cargo ship 21/2 football fields long will squeeze under the Key Bridge and deliver the future of the port of Baltimore. On its deck are four massive cranes built in China that state officials and the maritime industry hope will turn the already bustling Seagirt Marine Terminal into a conduit for mountains of goods delivered by the world's largest ships. Baltimore will join Norfolk, Va., as the only East Coast ports with 50-foot-deep berths and cranes able to accommodate vessels up to 1,200 feet long, which will begin using a widened Panama Canal in 2014.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz | julie.bykowicz@baltsun.com | December 17, 2009
The state Board of Public Works approved Wednesday a 50-year lease that will allow a private company to manage operations at the port of Baltimore. Officials say the deal will generate at least $1.3 billion and 5,700 new jobs. As part of the agreement, Ports of America Group will create a 50-foot-deep berth and purchase four cranes to help prepare Seagirt Marine Terminal for larger cargo ships that are expected after widening of the Panama Canal is completed in about four years.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,jay.hancock@baltsun.com | December 16, 2009
From the state that brought you electricity deregulation - we know how that worked! - comes a new plan to surrender crucial public assets to a private corporation. Today, the Maryland Board of Public Works votes on whether to lease Baltimore's premier port terminal to Ports America for 50 years. It's the final state approval the company needs to control the maritime artery that has nourished Baltimore for two centuries. Pushed by Gov. Martin O'Malley, who wants the $245 million Ports America would put up for port and highway spending, the transaction shows every sign of getting approved.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,michael.dresser@balltsun.com | October 4, 2008
The Maryland Port Administration has taken the first step toward leasing the Seagirt Marine Terminal to a private company that would spend more than $100 million to expand the terminal and then run it. The agency has agreed to hire a Florida-based consulting firm to identify possible bidders willing to spend $100 million to $120 million to expand Seagirt's capacity and then manage the terminal under a long-term lease with the state. The money is needed to build berths with a depth of 50 feet to accommodate the larger container ships that are expected to dominate world commerce after the widening and deepening of the Panama Canal is completed in 2014.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney | September 24, 1991
A new joint venture of two established shipping firms will begin service between South America and the port of Baltimore's Seagirt Marine Terminal Oct. 7, the Maryland Port Administration said yesterday.Mediterranean Shipping Co. of Geneva, Switzerland, and Empremar S.A., the national steamship line of Chile, will team up in a venture that will call at Seagirt once every three weeks initially, and then every two weeks after the service is established.The port administration says the venture will handle 6,000 containers of cargo per year.
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,michael.dresser@baltsun.com | July 1, 2009
The port of Baltimore has concentrated its search for a private partner to operate the state-owned Seagirt Marine Terminal on two competitors - a vital step in preparation for the expected widening of the Panama Canal in 2014. The Maryland Port Association said Tuesday that Ceres Terminals Inc./Alinda Capital Partners LLC and Ports America Group/Highstar Capital have passed the qualification process and will be permitted to submit bids to run the Southeast Baltimore terminal. The lead partners are both familiar names in the Baltimore port.
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