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NEWS
March 8, 2006
On Monday, March 6, 2006, DOLORES B. SACHS (nee Buckantz) loving wife of the late Jerome Sachs, beloved mother of Betsy Sachs, Hillary Sachs, Stacey Seabrook and the late Lynne Sachs, beloved mother-in-law of John Seabrook, devoted sister of Carolyn Mazer, loving grandmother of Brandon and Jordan Levine. Services at SOL LEVINSON & BROS. INC., 8900 Reisterstown Road at Mt. Wilson Lane on Wednesday, March 8 at 10 A.M. Interment Baltimore Hebrew Cemetery, Berrymans Lane. Please omit flowers.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | May 23, 2014
Left-handed pitcher Travis Seabrooke, the Orioles' fifth round pick last year out of a Canadian high school, tore the ACL in his right knee and had season-ending surgery Monday. Initially targeted for the Short-A Aberdeen rotation, Seabrooke will not pitch this season, but he should be back within the next year. "It is quite a lengthy recovery with those injuries, but hopefully next year at this time he'll be 100 percent healthy and ready to go,” Orioles player development director Brian Graham said.  Seabrooke, 18, signed last summer for a $291,800 bonus and pitched in three games, two starts, for the Rookie-level Gulf Coast League Orioles in 2013.
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NEWS
May 27, 2005
MYRTLE MARIE PETRY (TURNER), previously of Baltimore. Suddenly at her home (Hilton Head Island, SC), on Tuesday, January 25, 2005 in her 85th year. Beloved wife of the late George Henry Petry; loved mother of Toni "Antoinette" Abram of London Ontario Canada and Mickey "Michele" Froats and husband Ted Froats of Barrie Ontario Canada. Cherished Nana of Chantel Helsdon Seabrook, Danielle Froats and Mark Abram. Also loved by great-grandchildren, Morgan and Madison Seabrook. Predeceased by son Mark Petry.
NEWS
By michael sragow and michael sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | October 3, 2008
John Seabrook, the author of the original New Yorker story about Bob Kearns, the inventor of the intermittent windshield wiper, loves the movie adaptation with the same name, Flash of Genius. It retains every pungent line Seabrook put on paper, no matter how outlandish. It's exhilarating in an authentic, pathos-streaked way to see Kearns, through Greg Kinnear's inspired characterization of a wary obsessive, representing himself during his trial against Ford Motor Co. for stealing his design.
NEWS
October 8, 2003
Eleanor Lambert, 100, the publicist who put American designers alongside their Paris counterparts on the fashion map, died yesterday at her Manhattan home after a brief illness. During her decades-long career, Ms. Lambert presided over the International Best-Dressed List and helped create many of America's most important fashion institutions, such as the Metropolitan Museum of Art's Costume Institute and the Council of Fashion Designers of America. The Indiana-born daughter of a circus advance man, Ms. Lambert was a tireless arbiter of style, phoning from an elegant desk in her midtown Manhattan office to make genteel pitches about the industry's next big thing.
NEWS
By Boston Globe | March 15, 1991
EXETER, N.H. -- Sensing homicide detectives closing in on her, police say, Pamela Smart nervously confided to her student intern last July."I'm afraid one day you're gonna come in here and you're gonna be wired by the [expletive] police and I'm gonna be busted," according to transcripts of a tape recording played yesterday for a jury.Smart was right on both counts. Her words were taped by a concealed recorder worn by the intern, Cecelia Pierce, 16, of Seabrook, N.H.Much of the most damaging evidence against Smart when she was charged with being an accomplice to the murder of her husband was in four secretly recorded conversations between her and Pierce, who had turned police informant.
FEATURES
By Eric Adams | June 12, 1991
Miranda Pakulski rehearses her monologue alone in the middle of the floor. Twitching and shuddering, she dodges imaginary people who refuse to acknowledge her. Frustrated, she says unassertively, "Hey, watch where you're going."Her director, Adam Seabrook, isn't satisfied. He encourages her to shout the line as if it was her own, like she was the one being pushed around, not her character. "Make the whole play that one line," Mr. Seabrook says quietly, but with care. The advice hits home: The actress unleashes an emotional scream that echoes through the Fells Point Corner Theater.
FEATURES
By Matthew Gilb and Matthew Gilb,Boston Globe | June 5, 1994
If you can't take the heat, stay off the Internet? In the New Yorker for June 6, writer John Seabrook recounts the trauma of getting flamed on-line -- receiving a red-hot insult in his e-mail.The flame, which referred to Mr. Seabrook's January profile of Microsoft's Bill Gates, lapsed in and out of obscenity as it urged Mr. Seabrook to "look around and notice that real reporters don't fawn over their subjects" and that Tina Brown's magazine "is fast turning to compost."Licked by the dragon's tongue, Mr. Seabrook is devastated, and he has an information-age breakdown worthy of a Victorian novel: "I felt cold.
NEWS
By Compiled from the archives of the Historical Society of Carroll County | September 25, 1994
25 Years Ago* The search continued Friday for the casually dressed bandit who escaped from the Carroll County Bank and Trust Company with $1,943 Thursday. -- Democratic Advocate, Sept. 8, 1969.75 Years Ago* In Monday's primary the vote in every district of Carroll County was the largest ever known. The contest for state's attorney on the Republican ticket between Theodore Brown and William L. Seabrook was bitterly contested. Brown was backed by the Republican organization and won by a large majority.
NEWS
By Matthew Gilbert and Matthew Gilbert,BOSTON GLOBE | January 5, 1997
The New Yorker for Jan. 6 has an excellent, well-rounded piece on Hollywood, George Lucas and his "Star Wars" industry, which thrives 20 years after the first installment of the futuristic trilogy hit theaters. The article, written by John Seabrook, is occasioned by the rerelease of a digitally enhanced version of the trilogy, beginning with "Star Wars" Jan. 31, "The Empire Strikes Back" three weeks later, and "The Return of the Jedi" two weeks after that. Also, Lucas is now at work on a second "Star Wars" trilogy for release in 1999, 2001 and 2003.
NEWS
June 29, 2007
Velma C. Seabrooks, a retired Social Security Administration district office manager, died of lung cancer Friday at her Catonsville home. She was 79. Born Velma Castine Cherry in Ahoskie, N.C., she was raised and educated in Washington, D.C., where she joined the Social Security Administration as a clerk. She moved to Baltimore in 1960 and became a district manager of offices in Baltimore and Towson. Mrs. Seabrooks received two Commissioner Citations for her work with the federal agency.
NEWS
June 26, 2007
On June 22, 2007, VELMA C. SEABROOKS (District Manager for Social Security), devoted wife of Marion Seabrooks. On Wednesday, friends may call VAUGHN C. GREENE FUNERAL SERVICES (RANDALLSTOWN), 8728 Liberty Road from 4-8 P.M. On Thursday, Mrs. Seabrooks will lie in state at 1st Baptist Church of Baltimore, 4200 Liberty Heights Avenue where the family will receive friends from 11:30 A.M.-12 noon with services to follow. Inquiries to (410) 655-0015.
NEWS
March 8, 2006
On Monday, March 6, 2006, DOLORES B. SACHS (nee Buckantz) loving wife of the late Jerome Sachs, beloved mother of Betsy Sachs, Hillary Sachs, Stacey Seabrook and the late Lynne Sachs, beloved mother-in-law of John Seabrook, devoted sister of Carolyn Mazer, loving grandmother of Brandon and Jordan Levine. Services at SOL LEVINSON & BROS. INC., 8900 Reisterstown Road at Mt. Wilson Lane on Wednesday, March 8 at 10 A.M. Interment Baltimore Hebrew Cemetery, Berrymans Lane. Please omit flowers.
NEWS
May 27, 2005
MYRTLE MARIE PETRY (TURNER), previously of Baltimore. Suddenly at her home (Hilton Head Island, SC), on Tuesday, January 25, 2005 in her 85th year. Beloved wife of the late George Henry Petry; loved mother of Toni "Antoinette" Abram of London Ontario Canada and Mickey "Michele" Froats and husband Ted Froats of Barrie Ontario Canada. Cherished Nana of Chantel Helsdon Seabrook, Danielle Froats and Mark Abram. Also loved by great-grandchildren, Morgan and Madison Seabrook. Predeceased by son Mark Petry.
NEWS
October 8, 2003
Eleanor Lambert, 100, the publicist who put American designers alongside their Paris counterparts on the fashion map, died yesterday at her Manhattan home after a brief illness. During her decades-long career, Ms. Lambert presided over the International Best-Dressed List and helped create many of America's most important fashion institutions, such as the Metropolitan Museum of Art's Costume Institute and the Council of Fashion Designers of America. The Indiana-born daughter of a circus advance man, Ms. Lambert was a tireless arbiter of style, phoning from an elegant desk in her midtown Manhattan office to make genteel pitches about the industry's next big thing.
TOPIC
By Candus Thomson | April 29, 2001
In death, Meldrim Thomson accomplished once more what he had done so often as governor of New Hampshire: lower the flags to half staff. Thomson, the diminutive Republican firebrand with the deceptive courtly Southern accent and mannerisms, died April 19 at the age of 89. During his three terms as the Granite State's governor, he lowered the flags on public buildings for Good Friday to honor Jesus, lowered them to protest the Panama Canal treaty, lowered...
TOPIC
By Candus Thomson | April 29, 2001
In death, Meldrim Thomson accomplished once more what he had done so often as governor of New Hampshire: lower the flags to half staff. Thomson, the diminutive Republican firebrand with the deceptive courtly Southern accent and mannerisms, died April 19 at the age of 89. During his three terms as the Granite State's governor, he lowered the flags on public buildings for Good Friday to honor Jesus, lowered them to protest the Panama Canal treaty, lowered...
NEWS
By michael sragow and michael sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | October 3, 2008
John Seabrook, the author of the original New Yorker story about Bob Kearns, the inventor of the intermittent windshield wiper, loves the movie adaptation with the same name, Flash of Genius. It retains every pungent line Seabrook put on paper, no matter how outlandish. It's exhilarating in an authentic, pathos-streaked way to see Kearns, through Greg Kinnear's inspired characterization of a wary obsessive, representing himself during his trial against Ford Motor Co. for stealing his design.
NEWS
By Matthew Gilbert and Matthew Gilbert,BOSTON GLOBE | January 5, 1997
The New Yorker for Jan. 6 has an excellent, well-rounded piece on Hollywood, George Lucas and his "Star Wars" industry, which thrives 20 years after the first installment of the futuristic trilogy hit theaters. The article, written by John Seabrook, is occasioned by the rerelease of a digitally enhanced version of the trilogy, beginning with "Star Wars" Jan. 31, "The Empire Strikes Back" three weeks later, and "The Return of the Jedi" two weeks after that. Also, Lucas is now at work on a second "Star Wars" trilogy for release in 1999, 2001 and 2003.
NEWS
By Compiled from the archives of the Historical Society of Carroll County | September 25, 1994
25 Years Ago* The search continued Friday for the casually dressed bandit who escaped from the Carroll County Bank and Trust Company with $1,943 Thursday. -- Democratic Advocate, Sept. 8, 1969.75 Years Ago* In Monday's primary the vote in every district of Carroll County was the largest ever known. The contest for state's attorney on the Republican ticket between Theodore Brown and William L. Seabrook was bitterly contested. Brown was backed by the Republican organization and won by a large majority.
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