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By LAURA VECSEY | July 30, 2003
SARATOGA SPRINGS, N.Y. - The Funny Cide store on Caroline Street is the place to go for T-shirts and mugs bearing the picture of the underdog horse who rode a populist wave of anticipation into the Belmont Stakes. Did racing have another endearing outsider to lift its ailing profile? Did racing have another Seabiscuit? Ah, probably not. Funny Cide Fever has subsided a bit since that soggy day in June when the superior-bred and highly touted Empire Maker fired in the slop and mud and buried the best Hollywood story-in-the-making since, well, Seabiscuit.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,jacques.kelly@baltsun.com | May 11, 2009
As a new 44-cent commemorative envelope honoring fabled thoroughbred champion Seabiscuit is being released in California on Monday, one of Maryland's revered racing ambassadors will get an accolade too. Former Vice President Walter Mondale and his wife, Joan, have a letter of congratulation ready for Howard "Gelo" Hall, who has been a fixture at Pimlico and other tracks for nearly 70 years. The Mondales are Seabiscuit fans, and Joan Mondale sits on the Citizens' Stamp Advisory Committee.
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FEATURES
By Courtney Pomeroy and Courtney Pomeroy,Sun reporter | July 18, 2008
The Little Italy Open Air Film Festival continues its weekly outdoor movie screenings tonight with Seabiscuit. Red Pollard - Tobey Maguire's first major film role after starring in Spider-Man - is a Depression-era jockey with a broken spirit who finds hope through his exceptional horse, Seabiscuit. One of Seabiscuit's most memorable and inspiring races in the film takes place at Pimlico Race Course. This historical, inspirational and Oscar-nominated movie will be playing at 9 p.m. at High and Stiles streets.
FEATURES
By Courtney Pomeroy and Courtney Pomeroy,Sun reporter | July 18, 2008
The Little Italy Open Air Film Festival continues its weekly outdoor movie screenings tonight with Seabiscuit. Red Pollard - Tobey Maguire's first major film role after starring in Spider-Man - is a Depression-era jockey with a broken spirit who finds hope through his exceptional horse, Seabiscuit. One of Seabiscuit's most memorable and inspiring races in the film takes place at Pimlico Race Course. This historical, inspirational and Oscar-nominated movie will be playing at 9 p.m. at High and Stiles streets.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Eleanor R. Gillespie and Eleanor R. Gillespie,COX NEWS SERVICE | December 25, 2003
There's an old saying in horse racing: Breed the best to the best and hope for the best. That's exactly what director Gary Ross does with Seabiscuit. He's taken a trio of superb actors - Tobey Maguire, Jeff Bridges, Chris Cooper - and Laura Hillenbrand's thrillingly good best seller and melded them into a graceful, intelligent and heartfelt film. Right from the beginning, Ross lets us know this is not going to be just another maverick-stallion-finds-love-and-wins-th e-Big-Race story. Seabiscuit himself ( several horses, but Fighting Ferrari in close-ups)
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser | October 20, 2002
Laura Hillenbrand's book, Seabiscuit: An American Legend, remains perched for the 59th week on The New York Times best-seller list. It is being translated into 14 languages. And now, the colorful story of the Depression-era racehorse is being made into a movie. Filming started Monday, and the movie is scheduled for release by Christmas 2003. Hillenbrand, who lives in Washington, has served as a consultant, discussing the rags-to-riches story with the screenwriter as well as the actors.
FEATURES
By Susan Campbell and Susan Campbell,HARTFORD COURANT | July 17, 2003
STRATFORD, Conn. - The cool evening mist doesn't penetrate the ground beneath this beech tree in Stratford. Near here, monk parakeets native to South America, the descendants of long-ago escapees, have built their intricate nests. This is a favorite walk of Stratford poet Norah Pollard. She enjoys the juxtaposition of craggy fishermen and women on a nearby dock and the delicate green birds meant for cages. The beech's trunk is covered with whirls and folds that look, says the poet, like body sex-parts.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Paul Moran and Paul Moran,Newsday | July 20, 2003
Life was never this good when the horse known as I Two Step Too earned his oats running in races as far from the bright lights and big city as a thoroughbred racehorse gets. After all those years in the company of other four-legged broken dreams, reminded each time he would race in places like Boise, Stampede Park and the Montana State Fair that he was, as they say, "not much stock," his luck had taken a sudden turn for the better. Only last summer, he was slugging it out regularly, running hard, not fast, for small money at Les Bois Park in Idaho, and up for sale each time he ran. Then suddenly, I Two Step Too was a movie star on location, traveling first-class to Kentucky and Hollywood.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,SUN ARTS WRITER | August 3, 2003
Director Gary Ross doesn't actually turn his cameras off during a climactic horse race in his new movie, Seabiscuit, leaving viewers adrift in darkness, but he does the next best thing. In our culture, sight has become a kind of life-preserver used to make sense of the world around us, and Ross cleverly exploits that dependency. For nearly two hours, viewers have looked forward to the 1938 match race between Seabiscuit, the knobby-kneed bay colt and populist favorite, and War Admiral, patrician winner of the Triple Crown.
NEWS
July 25, 2003
An article in yesterday's Today section about the Maryland premiere of the movie Seabiscuit should have noted that the event was a fund-raiser for the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation and the Maryland Horse Industry Foundation.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,sun art critic | April 9, 2008
Not for nothing were the horses painted by Franklin B. Voss called noble steeds. They were magnificent animals, well-muscled, fast, sleek as racecars and groomed to a fare-thee-well. Even when the horses are standing still, you sense speed is in their blood. Voss was America's premier equine artist during the 1920s, '30s and '40s, when he painted such renowned racing champions as Man o' War, War Admiral, Citation, Whirlaway and Seabiscuit. In Voss' characterful images, their personalities come across as vividly as those of any human subject.
FEATURES
By LIA GORMSEN | August 5, 2006
What they are -- Shortbread cookies prepared by Graul's Market bakery as part of a summer fund-raiser for the Baltimore Opera Company. What we like about them --These buttery shortbread cookies are in the shape of a horse's head, with a yummy chocolate-dipped mane, and come packaged in a keepsake tin featuring a photograph of the wild horses of Assateague. The whole package, from the cookie baking to the photography on the tin, comes from Maryland-based businesses. All proceeds from the sale will benefit the Baltimore Opera Company.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen R. Proctor and Stephen R. Proctor,Special to the Sun | April 25, 2004
Funny Cide, by Sally Jenkins. Putnam. 320 pages $24.95. Laura Hillenbrand's Seabiscuit, the runaway best seller of 2001, set a standard for books about horses that few writers will be able to meet. But it won't be for lack of trying. Seabiscuit's phenomenal success -- it was also a hit movie -- stoked the market for horse-racing books. The latest is Funny Cide, the story of a blue-collar horse and his small-town owners who nearly took down the biggest prize in the Sport of Kings. This is no Seabiscuit, but it shares many of the qualities that made that book fire the imagination.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Eleanor R. Gillespie and Eleanor R. Gillespie,COX NEWS SERVICE | December 25, 2003
There's an old saying in horse racing: Breed the best to the best and hope for the best. That's exactly what director Gary Ross does with Seabiscuit. He's taken a trio of superb actors - Tobey Maguire, Jeff Bridges, Chris Cooper - and Laura Hillenbrand's thrillingly good best seller and melded them into a graceful, intelligent and heartfelt film. Right from the beginning, Ross lets us know this is not going to be just another maverick-stallion-finds-love-and-wins-th e-Big-Race story. Seabiscuit himself ( several horses, but Fighting Ferrari in close-ups)
NEWS
September 4, 2003
An interview with Carol Fritts, coordinator for the Library Media Specialists Book Club. How was this club formed? As media specialists, we like to discuss all types of books, but we don't get the chance to do adult books. When we do get together formally for work, we always talk about children's books. Because the media specialist is a unique position in the school, it can be kind of isolating. This club is an opportunity to meet with people who understand what you do and share a passion for reading.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | August 29, 2003
More than just propelling horse racing into a new spurt of popularity, Seabiscuit may trigger younger fans' fascination for the hardscrabble background of the story and the history of America's Great Depression. Earlier this year, WGBH Video released one of the most eloquent documentary treatments of that era: Riding the Rails, which whizzes by in an insight-packed 72 minutes. And it holds particular appeal to high-school viewers. Riding the Rails chronicles the teens of the '30s who rode freights to escape the hardship or the dreariness that hit their families after the economy collapsed.
NEWS
By GILBERT SANDLER | June 15, 1993
THIS was a sad year for horse racing's Triple Crown. No horse dominated all three races. There was little suspense. The year will be remembered not for Julie Krone's becoming the first woman to win a Triple Crown race (a splendid accomplishment), but for Preakness winner Prairie Bayou's tragic breakdown in the gloom at Belmont.Horse racing fans looked in vain for a Sunday Silence, an Affirmed, a Secretariat. There was no odds-on favorite, not even a sentimental favorite. All three of the Triple Crown events lacked the drama and excitement of the splendid match race between War Admiral and Seabiscuit in Baltimore Nov. 1, 1938.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,jacques.kelly@baltsun.com | May 11, 2009
As a new 44-cent commemorative envelope honoring fabled thoroughbred champion Seabiscuit is being released in California on Monday, one of Maryland's revered racing ambassadors will get an accolade too. Former Vice President Walter Mondale and his wife, Joan, have a letter of congratulation ready for Howard "Gelo" Hall, who has been a fixture at Pimlico and other tracks for nearly 70 years. The Mondales are Seabiscuit fans, and Joan Mondale sits on the Citizens' Stamp Advisory Committee.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | August 16, 2003
It seems audiences can't get enough of either Laura Hillenbrand's best-selling book, Seabiscuit: An American Legend, or the film it inspired as they cram into theaters during the waning days of summer. For David Woods of Longmeadow, Mass., and his sister, Martha McMakin of Walsenburg, Colo., the book and movie bring back warm memories of their father, David F. Woods. Woods, the director of public relations during the halcyon years of the Maryland Jockey Club, helped make the 1938 match race between War Admiral and Seabiscuit a reality.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | August 8, 2003
According to Nick Nicholson, the president of Keeneland Race Course in Lexington, Ky., the 1938 match race between Seabiscuit and War Admiral at Pimlico is the equivalent in racehorse history of "Babe Ruth's 60th home run or Roger Maris' 61st." So why did Gary Ross, who strove for exact detail when he directed the hit film Seabiscuit, restage that race at Keeneland instead of Pimlico? As he said in an interview the week before the movie's opening, the answer is simple: "Pimlico has been modernized to an extent that made it impossible to use for period purposes."
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