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By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2012
A Pennsylvania man was killed and his two-year-old child was injured Tuesday when the pair fell from an Ocean City sea wall onto rocks below, police said Wednesday. Stephen Richard Ostan, 49, of Marcus Hook, Pa., and his child were walking along a retaining wall at the Ocean City inlet when they fell over the edge together, witnesses told police, beach patrol and fire personnel who arrived on the scene about 3 p.m. Following the fall, in which police believe Ostan suffered a severe head injury and the child suffered non-life-threatening injuries, an unidentified woman climbed down the wall and pulled the child, who was clinging to rocks, from the water, police said.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 29, 2014
Commentator Dan Ervin's recent discussion of the region's need for nuclear power argues that green alternatives such as wind and solar power can't adequately meet our energy needs ( "The nuclear option Aug. 26). He goes on to describe how green nuclear power is and how it won't contribute to global warming by contributing to carbon dioxide emissions. OK, I'll buy that. But isn't one of the most established facts about global warming the rise in sea levels we've already experience right here in the Chesapeake Bay?
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NEWS
By Nicole Fuller, The Baltimore Sun | May 13, 2012
They departed the northwest coast of France two months ago — 26 crew members each aboard two historic French Navy schooners headed to North America. With relatively calm seas, a chef well-versed in French cuisine and plenty of technological updates to the World War II-era ships, the boats made an easy voyage to the U.S. Naval Academy in Annapolis. On Sunday, the public got the chance to tour them. The schooners made the journey as part of the bicentennial of the War of 1812. The Etoile, or Star, and the Belle Poule, or Beautiful Chicken, left Brest, France, on March 8. The boats stopped in the Caribbean and Florida, participated in a tall ships race in Savannah, Ga., and docked on Friday in Annapolis.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | December 12, 2013
For most of John Ruppert's career, metal sculpture has been a major focus, but he has added photography to his pursuits lately. Some of the results can be sampled and savored in an exhibit at C. Grimaldis Gallery titled "The Iceland Project. " The Massachusetts-born artist, who has a studio in Druid Hill, was one of the first winners of the $25,000 Baker Prize in 2009. He has been a faculty member at the University of Maryland, College Park, since 1987 and chair of its art department for the past 15 years.
NEWS
August 29, 2014
Commentator Dan Ervin's recent discussion of the region's need for nuclear power argues that green alternatives such as wind and solar power can't adequately meet our energy needs ( "The nuclear option Aug. 26). He goes on to describe how green nuclear power is and how it won't contribute to global warming by contributing to carbon dioxide emissions. OK, I'll buy that. But isn't one of the most established facts about global warming the rise in sea levels we've already experience right here in the Chesapeake Bay?
NEWS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | June 19, 2012
ABOARD THE COAST GUARD CUTTER SLEDGE — The party's over. Just after dawn Tuesday, the naval vessels, with hulls as gray as the morning, slipped from their berths and headed for open water. Later, as the sun broke through, the stars of Sailabration — the tall ships — gathered up their good-time vibe, unfurled their sails and followed the same path. Maryland's Star-Spangled commemoration of the War of 1812 ended Tuesday morning after a week filled with fireworks, screaming jets and hundreds of thousands of visitors to the Inner Harbor, Fells Point and Fort McHenry.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | December 12, 2013
For most of John Ruppert's career, metal sculpture has been a major focus, but he has added photography to his pursuits lately. Some of the results can be sampled and savored in an exhibit at C. Grimaldis Gallery titled "The Iceland Project. " The Massachusetts-born artist, who has a studio in Druid Hill, was one of the first winners of the $25,000 Baker Prize in 2009. He has been a faculty member at the University of Maryland, College Park, since 1987 and chair of its art department for the past 15 years.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | November 5, 2012
Charles H. "Harry" Heinlein, a young Army machine-gunner who survived the D-Day landing on Omaha Beach on June 6, 1944, and returned 60 years later, died Saturday of pneumonia at Stella Maris Hospice. The longtime Violetville resident was 90. Mr. Heinlein was a 22-year-old private from Baltimore attached to the famed 29th Division when he landed on Omaha Beach at 7:40 a.m. June 6, 1944, as part of what Supreme Allied Commander Dwight D. Eisenhower called the "Great Crusade" that would eventually liberate Europe's millions from the domination of Adolf Hitler.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2010
At a summertime party, my dinner companion turned out to be none other than the incomparable Barbara Sealy Mallory Hathaway, one of my favorite people, whom everyone calls "Bunny. " At some point in the evening, table talk turned to shipwrecks (she's from an old New England shipping family) and other disasters, both manmade and natural. Bunny, who lives in Owings Mills, had recently been going though some old family files and mentioned that she had letters written by relatives who had survived the great hurricane that swept into Galveston, Texas, on Sept.
NEWS
January 6, 1995
A state emergency response team was dispatched to the Naval Academy yesterday to contain fuel oil leeching from the school's sea wall.The oily water was noticed shortly before noon near the Robert Crown Sailing Center, and academy officials notified the Maryland Department of the Environment. An emergency response team contained the leak at Santee Basin, where the academy's sailboats are berthed, with absorbent booms."It appears to be No. 2 fuel oil leeching from the sea wall," said Quentin Banks, an MDE spokesman.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | November 5, 2012
Charles H. "Harry" Heinlein, a young Army machine-gunner who survived the D-Day landing on Omaha Beach on June 6, 1944, and returned 60 years later, died Saturday of pneumonia at Stella Maris Hospice. The longtime Violetville resident was 90. Mr. Heinlein was a 22-year-old private from Baltimore attached to the famed 29th Division when he landed on Omaha Beach at 7:40 a.m. June 6, 1944, as part of what Supreme Allied Commander Dwight D. Eisenhower called the "Great Crusade" that would eventually liberate Europe's millions from the domination of Adolf Hitler.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2012
A Pennsylvania man was killed and his two-year-old child was injured Tuesday when the pair fell from an Ocean City sea wall onto rocks below, police said Wednesday. Stephen Richard Ostan, 49, of Marcus Hook, Pa., and his child were walking along a retaining wall at the Ocean City inlet when they fell over the edge together, witnesses told police, beach patrol and fire personnel who arrived on the scene about 3 p.m. Following the fall, in which police believe Ostan suffered a severe head injury and the child suffered non-life-threatening injuries, an unidentified woman climbed down the wall and pulled the child, who was clinging to rocks, from the water, police said.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | June 19, 2012
ABOARD THE COAST GUARD CUTTER SLEDGE — The party's over. Just after dawn Tuesday, the naval vessels, with hulls as gray as the morning, slipped from their berths and headed for open water. Later, as the sun broke through, the stars of Sailabration — the tall ships — gathered up their good-time vibe, unfurled their sails and followed the same path. Maryland's Star-Spangled commemoration of the War of 1812 ended Tuesday morning after a week filled with fireworks, screaming jets and hundreds of thousands of visitors to the Inner Harbor, Fells Point and Fort McHenry.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller, The Baltimore Sun | May 13, 2012
They departed the northwest coast of France two months ago — 26 crew members each aboard two historic French Navy schooners headed to North America. With relatively calm seas, a chef well-versed in French cuisine and plenty of technological updates to the World War II-era ships, the boats made an easy voyage to the U.S. Naval Academy in Annapolis. On Sunday, the public got the chance to tour them. The schooners made the journey as part of the bicentennial of the War of 1812. The Etoile, or Star, and the Belle Poule, or Beautiful Chicken, left Brest, France, on March 8. The boats stopped in the Caribbean and Florida, participated in a tall ships race in Savannah, Ga., and docked on Friday in Annapolis.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2010
At a summertime party, my dinner companion turned out to be none other than the incomparable Barbara Sealy Mallory Hathaway, one of my favorite people, whom everyone calls "Bunny. " At some point in the evening, table talk turned to shipwrecks (she's from an old New England shipping family) and other disasters, both manmade and natural. Bunny, who lives in Owings Mills, had recently been going though some old family files and mentioned that she had letters written by relatives who had survived the great hurricane that swept into Galveston, Texas, on Sept.
NEWS
By Jessica Valdez and Jessica Valdez,SUN STAFF | July 8, 2003
Fort McHenry's sea wall is in a battle with nature. Holes as long as 6 feet gape from the 200-year-old granite barrier, which protects Fort McHenry from the Patapsco River. "Some cavities are 36 inches deep, more than half of [the wall's depth]," said Greg McGuire, the fort's maintenance chief. "You could hide a person in some of these." The wall, built in three phases from 1816 to 1897 to keep the river from eroding the land, has been damaged by storms and the wear of tides and waves.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Staff Writer | October 11, 1992
EASTERN NECK ISLAND -- Standing in the shallows, a grea blue heron glared at the huge, yellow dump truck that had interrupted its lunchtime fishing.The truck deposited its 20-ton load of granite, and a power shovel roared to life. Its mantis-like arm lifted boulders one by one and placed them gently atop a rock wall shielding the shoreline and the heron from the wind-whipped waves of the Chesapeake Bay.Nature reigns at Eastern Neck National Wildlife Refuge, which occupies this 2,200-acre island jutting into the mouth of the Chester River on the Eastern Shore.
NEWS
By James G. Titus | May 25, 1997
THIS WEEKEND, hundreds of thousands of people from the Baltimore and Washington areas will visit the coast - particularly Ocean City and various communities along the Delaware shore. For many, going to the beach is such a well-established tradition that it would be unthinkable to contemplate that one day there might not be a beach to go to.But the beaches that our grandparents visited along the shores of Chesapeake Bay are gradually being replaced with walls of concrete, rock, steel and wood.
NEWS
By Gary Polakovic and Gary Polakovic,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 3, 2000
In the Southern California beach city of Encinitas, two big houses that neighbors Stanley Cantor and Paul Denver built on a coastal cliff north of San Diego were in danger of toppling into the Pacific 80 feet below, so they built a sea wall to check erosion. Near Pismo Beach, along the Central California coast, waves gnawing at a bluff posed a hazard to the Cliffs hotel, so the owner installed a 13-foot-high boulder facing on the beach. And in Northern California's upscale town of Carmel, big winter storms three years ago obliterated much of the slope beneath Carl and Jane Panattoni's house, so they are building a 260-foot wooden barricade to hold back the waves.
NEWS
By James G. Titus | May 25, 1997
THIS WEEKEND, hundreds of thousands of people from the Baltimore and Washington areas will visit the coast - particularly Ocean City and various communities along the Delaware shore. For many, going to the beach is such a well-established tradition that it would be unthinkable to contemplate that one day there might not be a beach to go to.But the beaches that our grandparents visited along the shores of Chesapeake Bay are gradually being replaced with walls of concrete, rock, steel and wood.
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