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By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | August 16, 2011
  On Vixen! On Prancer! On .... Oceana? They're probably not heading to the north pole, but the three sea turtles the National Aquarium released into the wild on Friday might just be heading in that general direction. The aquarium and Oceana, an ocean protection organization, released three endangered Kemp's ridley sea turtles into the Chesapeake Bay at Point Lookout State Park last week. The turtles had been recuperating at the aquqarium since last winter, when they were founded stranded in Cape Cod. Kemp's ridley's are the most endangered and smallest of all sea turtle species, Aquarium officials say. The wintertime Massachusett's water temperature was especially dangerous for the sensitive turtles.
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By Chris Korman, The Baltimore Sun | April 6, 2013
Three endangered sea turtles that spent the winter in Baltimore departed Saturday evening, joining a caravan of at least 43 others bound for Florida's warm waters and a return to their natural habitat. The three turtles — Chet, Biff and Two-Bit — were among more than 200 sea turtles to wash ashore on Massachusetts beaches, critically ill with hypothermia, last November and December. When The New England Aquarium's sea turtle hospital reached capacity, rescuers reached out to other facilities up and down the East Coast to find foster homes.
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By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | June 18, 2010
Three endangered Kemp's ridley sea turtles that have been nursed back to health at the National Aquarium in Baltimore are to be returned to the wild Saturday at the southern tip of Maryland. The turtles were rescued from New England and Delaware last winter suffering from cold stunning, a form of hypothermia. After six months of rehabilitation at the aquarium, the animals are being released at 11 a.m. at Point Lookout State Park in St. Mary's County, where the Potomac River joins the Chesapeake Bay. Sign up for Baltimore Sun local news text alerts
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | August 16, 2011
  On Vixen! On Prancer! On .... Oceana? They're probably not heading to the north pole, but the three sea turtles the National Aquarium released into the wild on Friday might just be heading in that general direction. The aquarium and Oceana, an ocean protection organization, released three endangered Kemp's ridley sea turtles into the Chesapeake Bay at Point Lookout State Park last week. The turtles had been recuperating at the aquqarium since last winter, when they were founded stranded in Cape Cod. Kemp's ridley's are the most endangered and smallest of all sea turtle species, Aquarium officials say. The wintertime Massachusett's water temperature was especially dangerous for the sensitive turtles.
NEWS
By David Michael Ettlin | November 22, 1991
A Baltimore Zoo educator is heading to Australia's Great Barrier Reef, leaving the land of the Maryland terrapin to help save endangered sea turtles.Jennifer A. Kureen will leave Sunday for her second Australia trip in as many years, to live in a beach camp through December and much of January -- peak summer months Down Under -- while watching over the egg-laying rituals of female loggerhead and flatback turtles.Ms. Kureen, 35, says the trip -- taken at her own expense with no salary -- provides a unique opportunity to work with turtle researchers, picking up firsthand conservation experience and helping to teach the hundreds of people who visit the area.
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By Heather Dewar and Heather Dewar,SUN STAFF | June 20, 2001
The bodies of nearly 200 rare, federally protected sea turtles have washed up near the mouth of the Chesapeake Bay and along Maryland's Atlantic coast in the past four weeks. Worried federal fishery managers imposed emergency restrictions on some Virginia fishing nets, beginning today. The turtles began washing up on the region's shores in late May, said Jack Musick, head of the Virginia Sea Turtle Stranding Network. Most are loggerheads, protected by the Endangered Species Act, which lists them as threatened with extinction.
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By Cory Dean and Cory Dean,New York Times News Service | April 5, 1992
ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. -- Every spring, the sea turtles begin returning to the beaches of Florida to lay their eggs.Theirs is a treacherous journey. Shrimpers' trawls drown them, lights on ship and shore confuse them, and they are routinely ground up by dredging equipment.But a more intractable problem awaits the females lucky enough make it to shore: in many places, erosion has left them with no place to dig a good nest.Conservationists, oceanfront communities and state officials say they want to help the turtles, but they cannot agree how.Every time someone proposes a remedy, someone else is quick to explain how it will only make things worse.
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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 11, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Interior Secretary Bruce Babbitt has said that his biggest mistake in the Wisconsin casino controversy was meeting privately with one of the lobbyists involved in the fight. If so, it appears to be a mistake he repeated on another occasion on a different issue.The issue this time: whether officials in Volusia County, Fla., including the resort town of Daytona Beach, should be required to ban driving on beaches to spare baby sea turtles, which are on the federal government's list of threatened species.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | December 23, 2002
Battered by the surf, nearly frozen by the sea and with five stitches above its right eye, the young turtle known as 02-21LK may be feeling a bit under the weather these days. So most mornings, the Kemp's ridley sea turtle is plucked from a tank at the National Aquarium and fed by hand a spoonful of fish with antibiotics rolled up in it. This creature - the world's rarest type of sea turtle - is on the mend, aquarium staffers say. They refer to it as 02-21LK because it is only a visitor and was the 21st rescued animal brought to the aquarium in 2002.
NEWS
By Richard C. Paddock and Richard C. Paddock,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 17, 2001
TANJUNG BENOA, Indonesia - Time was running out for the green sea turtles. Four of them lay on the concrete floor of a Bali slaughterhouse, their front flippers tied together so they couldn't crawl away. Another lay on its back, unable to move. An empty shell, still wet with blood, rested in a corner as Soleh the butcher squatted by an open fire, cooking the meat of the animal on skewers. The turtle's destination: a Hindu celebration at nearby Udayana University. In most of the world, green sea turtles are considered endangered.
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By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman, The Baltimore Sun | January 12, 2011
'Winter Seafari' in Virginia Beach includes aquarium fun What's the deal: The Virginia Beach Winter Seafari packages include two nights' accommodations at a participating hotel, tickets to the Virginia Aquarium & Marine Science Center and IMAX theater, daily breakfast (available at participating hotels) and a choice of one premium Virginia Aquarium experience — either a Winter Wildlife Boat Trip; Sea Turtles: Behind the Scenes; or Harbor Seals: Behind the Scenes. The packages are available through March and start at $83 per person.
FEATURES
By Nancy Jones-Bonbrest, Special to The Baltimore Sun | December 5, 2010
Like many who heard about the BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill, the students of Camp Achieve in Baltimore were upset to learn of the damage it caused, especially to the animals that were forced from their habitats. So they did something about it. First-through-fourth-graders at the summer academic program contributed to a handmade quilt that was donated to benefit the Art vs. Oil Spill charity auctions held on the Gulf Coast this fall. "The kids were really excited about the project and to help out," said Brenda Wade, founder and executive director of Achievement Services, the nonprofit organization that operates Camp Achieve.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | June 18, 2010
Three endangered Kemp's ridley sea turtles that have been nursed back to health at the National Aquarium in Baltimore are to be returned to the wild Saturday at the southern tip of Maryland. The turtles were rescued from New England and Delaware last winter suffering from cold stunning, a form of hypothermia. After six months of rehabilitation at the aquarium, the animals are being released at 11 a.m. at Point Lookout State Park in St. Mary's County, where the Potomac River joins the Chesapeake Bay. Sign up for Baltimore Sun local news text alerts
NEWS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | June 7, 2010
As the Gulf oil spill ensnares marine animals, the staff at the National Aquarium and the state's wildlife veterinarian are preparing for a life or death situation. For the aquarium, the phone may ring and someone will ask for help recovering animals or if some of its pools can be converted to intensive care units for injured sea turtles. As part of the Marine Mammal Stranding Network, the aquarium is housing four healing turtles from natural mishaps here and in New England that it would like to release in June to make room for Gulf turtles.
NEWS
By Jeff Corwin | December 2, 2009
There is a holocaust happening. Right now. And it's not confined to one nation or even one region. It is a global crisis. Species are going extinct en masse. Every 20 minutes, we lose an animal species. If this rate continues, by century's end, 50 percent of all living species will be gone. It is a phenomenon known as the sixth extinction. The fifth extinction took place 65 million years ago, when a meteor smashed into the Earth, killing off the dinosaurs and many other species and opening the door for the rise of mammals.
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By Erica Marcus and Erica Marcus,Newsday | March 12, 2008
I read recently that shrimp are caught in nets that routinely harm sea turtles and that anyone who truly is concerned with such issues should boycott shrimp. Can you address these issues? When it comes to shrimp, the concerned consumer can feel as if she is caught between a sea turtle and a mangrove tree: The former is a historic victim of wild shrimp-catching; the latter, of shrimp-farming. But the threat to both of these species is probably on the wane. Wild shrimp are caught by trawlers in waters close to the shore.
NEWS
By Reed Hellman and Reed Hellman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 5, 2000
TOPSAIL, N.C. - At first glance, this story is about nine sea turtles: Five massive loggerheads, three highly endangered Kemp's ridleys and a little green named Cheesecake. All had been found in distress - suffering from maladies ranging from hypothermia to injuries that came from collisions with commercial fishing nets. All got a second chance on life at the Topsail Beach Sea Turtle Hospital in this oceanfront enclave. Late last month, after the ocean temperature reached 75 degrees, the nine were sent back to the sea - a small victory for preservation.
NEWS
By CHRIS YAKAITIS and CHRIS YAKAITIS,SUN REPORTER | June 13, 2006
Among the thousands of visitors to the National Aquarium in Baltimore this summer is a rare, endangered sea turtle. But aquarium officials hope his - or her - stay is a short one. An injured Kemp's ridley sea turtle arrived at the aquarium last week after being rescued near Hoopers Island on the Eastern Shore. The 20-inch turtle, measured by its shell, was found with a recreational fishing hook lodged deep in its throat, just above the stomach, and a flesh injury along the side of its mouth, likely caused by the fishing line.
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