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By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | May 15, 2012
They crawled through muddy trenches. They did sit-ups in the Severn River. They performed a mock evacuation of an injured pilot. And they kept on going. Midshipmen completing their first year at the Naval Academy endured the rigorous 14-hour Sea Trials on Tuesday. The annual training exercise put the approximately 1,000 plebes through 30 challenging events from predawn darkness through late afternoon. "One, two, three, 10," hollered plebes of the 10th Company as they counted squats in the water before flopping backward with a roar.
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SPORTS
Sports Digest | June 27, 2014
Et cetera Pannell's late goal lifts Team USA to 10-9 win in MLL All-Star Game The New York Lizards' Rob Pannell scored with seven seconds remaining to lift Team USA to a 10-9 victory over Team MLL on Thursday night before an announced 10,327 at Harvard Stadium in Cambridge, Mass. Pannell, who also had two assists, was named the game's Most Valuable Player. Team MLL's Joe Walters (Maryland) of the Chesapeake Bayhawks led all scorers with three goals. Marcus Holman (Gilman)
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NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | May 13, 2014
By midmorning Tuesday, Naval Academy Midshipman Kevin Saxton had been awake for eight hours, tackled an obstacle course, survived an endurance run and beat his classmates with pugil sticks. Sweat dripping down his face as he scarfed down trail mix, Saxton said his day at the annual academy Sea Trials was already a success - a sweaty, sandy, muddy good time with his band of classmates in Annapolis. "It's a lot of fun. Pretty physically challenging," said Saxton, a systems engineering major from Grand Rapids, Mich., who aspires to be a Marine Corps pilot.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | May 13, 2014
By midmorning Tuesday, Naval Academy Midshipman Kevin Saxton had been awake for eight hours, tackled an obstacle course, survived an endurance run and beat his classmates with pugil sticks. Sweat dripping down his face as he scarfed down trail mix, Saxton said his day at the annual academy Sea Trials was already a success - a sweaty, sandy, muddy good time with his band of classmates in Annapolis. "It's a lot of fun. Pretty physically challenging," said Saxton, a systems engineering major from Grand Rapids, Mich., who aspires to be a Marine Corps pilot.
NEWS
By Neal Thompson and Neal Thompson,SUN STAFF | April 22, 1998
Eighteen people downed by heat exhaustion. One broken toe. One case of hypothermia. One severe asthma attack. And nearly 1,000 caked in mud and sweat, trembling with exhaustion.That's how the Naval Academy measures success.Three days after its Sea Trials -- a new daylong endurance test for freshmen -- the academy said yesterday that the event had the desired effect: It forced weary midshipmen to work as teammates to survive a grueling 12 hours of push-ups, obstacle courses, relay races and more push-ups.
NEWS
By Neal Thompson and Neal Thompson,SUN STAFF | April 18, 1998
Beginning at 5 o'clock this morning, a new rite is being shoehorned onto the list of rituals that define a year at the Naval Academy.It's called Sea Trials, a pretty title for 12 hours of sweating and grunting that academy freshmen -- called plebes -- must withstand today.For the first time, the academy is seeking to create a final hurdle for plebes to jump before they are no longer considered pond scum."Plebe" means, basically, lowlife. Sea Trials is intended as passage from the depths of plebe life, which requires a subservient attitude and endless menial chores.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | May 14, 2013
The wake-up call came at 3:15 a.m. Tuesday, but Midshipman Alberto Salabarria was ready well before then. Anticipating a grueling, thrilling, muddy day of Sea Trials at the Naval Academy, Salabarria and some of his classmates couldn't wait. "Everyone was listening to music, trying to motivate themselves," Salabarria said. Staying upbeat is a key to surviving Sea Trials, a 14-hour test of strength, endurance and will that marks the end of the freshman, or "plebe," year at the Naval Academy.
NEWS
By Neal Thompson and Neal Thompson,SUN STAFF | April 22, 1998
Eighteen people downed by heat exhaustion. One broken toe. One case of hypothermia. One severe asthma attack. And nearly 1,000 caked in mud and sweat, trembling with exhaustion.That's how the Naval Academy measures success.Three days after its Sea Trials -- a new daylong endurance test for freshmen -- the academy said yesterday that the event had the desired effect: It forced weary midshipmen to work as teammates to survive a grueling 12 hours of push-ups, obstacle courses, relay races and more push-ups.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | May 12, 2010
The Naval Academy's traditional Herndon climb — a scramble to replace the hat at the top of a 21-foot-tall, lard-coated obelisk — may slip-slide away. Vice Adm. Jeffrey L. Fowler, departing superintendent of the Naval Academy, said Wednesday that the greasy climb that signals the end of freshman year every spring has an uncertain future. Though the traditional competition will take place later this month, there have been concerns about injuries as the plebes trample and tumble over each other to replace the plebe "Dixie cup" hat at the top with an upperclassman's hat. Some plebes have been hurt, but none seriously, as the midshipmen step on faces, heads and shoulders.
NEWS
By Laura Sullivan and Laura Sullivan,SUN STAFF | May 16, 2001
The mud was everywhere - on their faces, in their hair, turning their white military-issue shirts a deep, solid brown. Over a 12-hour period yesterday, freshmen at the Naval Academy threw themselves at one another with the ferocity of battle in a 3-foot-deep pit of thick, chocolate-colored water. They ran for miles in combat gear, hurled themselves over obstacle courses and crawled under barbed wire against the force of a fire hose while dragging a classmate who was bound hand to foot.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | May 14, 2013
The wake-up call came at 3:15 a.m. Tuesday, but Midshipman Alberto Salabarria was ready well before then. Anticipating a grueling, thrilling, muddy day of Sea Trials at the Naval Academy, Salabarria and some of his classmates couldn't wait. "Everyone was listening to music, trying to motivate themselves," Salabarria said. Staying upbeat is a key to surviving Sea Trials, a 14-hour test of strength, endurance and will that marks the end of the freshman, or "plebe," year at the Naval Academy.
NEWS
The Baltimore Sun | May 16, 2012
WEATHER Today's forecast calls for mostly sunny skies and a high temperature near 85 degrees. Tonight is is expected to be partly cloudy, with a low temperature around 60 degrees. TRAFFIC Check our traffic updates for this morning's issues as you plan your commute. FROM LAST NIGHT... Parkville pair face more than a dozen charges in sex 'slave' case : A Parkville couple accused of treating a 15-year-old girl from North Carolina as their personal sex "slave" and filming and distributing videos online of their sexual interactions with her have each been indicted on more than a dozen state and federal sex abuse charges.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | May 15, 2012
They crawled through muddy trenches. They did sit-ups in the Severn River. They performed a mock evacuation of an injured pilot. And they kept on going. Midshipmen completing their first year at the Naval Academy endured the rigorous 14-hour Sea Trials on Tuesday. The annual training exercise put the approximately 1,000 plebes through 30 challenging events from predawn darkness through late afternoon. "One, two, three, 10," hollered plebes of the 10th Company as they counted squats in the water before flopping backward with a roar.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | May 12, 2010
The Naval Academy's traditional Herndon climb — a scramble to replace the hat at the top of a 21-foot-tall, lard-coated obelisk — may slip-slide away. Vice Adm. Jeffrey L. Fowler, departing superintendent of the Naval Academy, said Wednesday that the greasy climb that signals the end of freshman year every spring has an uncertain future. Though the traditional competition will take place later this month, there have been concerns about injuries as the plebes trample and tumble over each other to replace the plebe "Dixie cup" hat at the top with an upperclassman's hat. Some plebes have been hurt, but none seriously, as the midshipmen step on faces, heads and shoulders.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,Sun reporter | May 16, 2007
It was sunup yesterday when Naval Academy freshmen began the gauntlet of physical tests known as Sea Trials. And for 14 hours they came one after the other: races, tugs of war, rope climbing, swimming and boating, all over the Yard and on the banks of the Severn River. The event is considered the culmination of midshipmen's first year at the Annapolis academy. Obstacles are meant to challenge plebes in endurance, teamwork, problem-solving and teach leadership in times of stress. "If they go to war or go to sea, there will be days that last longer than this," academy spokeswoman Judy Campbell said.
NEWS
By NANINE HARTZENBUSCH and NANINE HARTZENBUSCH,SUN REPORTER | May 21, 2006
Jake McIlwain, 19, of Beebe, Ariz., a plebe at the Naval Academy with the First Company, crawls on his hands and knees through a human tunnel of fellow plebes on the sandy banks of the Severn River on the academy's Annapolis campus. Tuesday, McIlwain and about 1,000 classmates took part in Sea Trials, an annual challenge marking the passage from plebe to midshipman. He started what would be a 14-hour day at 3:30 am, getting ready to take on the first of almost 30 obstacles and challenges that emphasized team-building activities and survival skills.
NEWS
By Molly Knight and Molly Knight,SUN STAFF | May 19, 2004
Poised on all fours at the edge of puddle of mud, four plebes -- or Naval Academy freshman -- listened attentively as an upperclassman shouted orders. "Stay on your hands and knees," yelled Adam Allegro, a sophomore. "And no head locks or choking." Pausing before he set the students loose into the chocolate-colored pool, Allegro added: "Oh, and this is mud wrestling -- so wrestle!" With that, the plebes charged into the puddle, scrambling to find a water-tight picture of the academy's landmark Herndon Monument somewhere beneath the murky surface as part of the annual Sea Trials -- a day-long endurance test for the 1,150 plebes.
NEWS
The Baltimore Sun | May 16, 2012
WEATHER Today's forecast calls for mostly sunny skies and a high temperature near 85 degrees. Tonight is is expected to be partly cloudy, with a low temperature around 60 degrees. TRAFFIC Check our traffic updates for this morning's issues as you plan your commute. FROM LAST NIGHT... Parkville pair face more than a dozen charges in sex 'slave' case : A Parkville couple accused of treating a 15-year-old girl from North Carolina as their personal sex "slave" and filming and distributing videos online of their sexual interactions with her have each been indicted on more than a dozen state and federal sex abuse charges.
NEWS
By Molly Knight and Molly Knight,SUN STAFF | May 19, 2004
Poised on all fours at the edge of puddle of mud, four plebes -- or Naval Academy freshman -- listened attentively as an upperclassman shouted orders. "Stay on your hands and knees," yelled Adam Allegro, a sophomore. "And no head locks or choking." Pausing before he set the students loose into the chocolate-colored pool, Allegro added: "Oh, and this is mud wrestling -- so wrestle!" With that, the plebes charged into the puddle, scrambling to find a water-tight picture of the academy's landmark Herndon Monument somewhere beneath the murky surface as part of the annual Sea Trials -- a day-long endurance test for the 1,150 plebes.
SPORTS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 13, 2002
The guys at Pacific Asian Enterprises in California thought they had a pretty good trawler in the 40-footer they took off their production lines and cruised in Alaskan waters. But they wanted more adventure, a chance to get the designers and sales teams more familiar with the boat, and, oh, OK, "some promotional benefits as well," says PAE vice president Jim Leishman. So they set out last November to cruise their Nordhavn 40 around the world, 26,000 miles in 26 weeks with rotating crews.
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