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By Russell Working and Russell Working,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 25, 1999
VLADIVOSTOK, Russia -- At the end of a bay filled with the sunken hulks of the once mighty Soviet navy, a former military vessel called the Pallada is moored at a private dockyard, waiting to be cut down to scrap.It might be a long wait.Business at the Svatko Ltd. scrap yard should be booming. The bays around Vladivostok, once a closed naval-base city of 700,000 on the Sea of Japan, are filled with rusting battleships, submarines and troop transports -- at least 101 large- and small-tonnage vessels, many sunken.
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NEWS
By Bruce Wallace and Bruce Wallace,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 17, 2007
TOKYO -- Nine elderly people were crushed to death in an earthquake yesterday off Japan's north coast, a powerful undersea shudder that left 900 others injured while flattening dozens of houses, tearing up highways and causing a small amount of radioactive water to leak from the world's largest nuclear power station into the Sea of Japan. The radioactive leak, which the nuclear plant's owners said posed no health threat but took several hours to discover and report to the public, brought a flurry of criticism.
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NEWS
July 9, 2006
North Korean response, ordered by the nation's leader, in response to international outrage over North Korea's launching of several missiles over the Sea of Japan. "Our military will continue with missile launch drills. . . .If anyone intends to dispute or add pressure about this, we will have to take stronger physical actions." Kim Jong Il
NEWS
July 9, 2006
North Korean response, ordered by the nation's leader, in response to international outrage over North Korea's launching of several missiles over the Sea of Japan. "Our military will continue with missile launch drills. . . .If anyone intends to dispute or add pressure about this, we will have to take stronger physical actions." Kim Jong Il
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau of The Sun | May 8, 1991
WASHINGTON -- A federal appeals court upheld yesterday a jury's conclusion that a Korean Air Lines flight crew's "willful misconduct" was to blame for the death of all aboard a jet shot down by Soviet military aircraft over the Sea of Japan nearly eight years ago.The ruling by the U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals clears the way for a new round of court proceedings in which the survivors of 137 of the passengers will be asking for millions in damages from the...
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | March 11, 2003
TOKYO - Japan and South Korea responded calmly yesterday after North Korea test-fired a second anti-ship missile in as many weeks into the Sea of Japan, in what appeared to be another attempt to rattle the United States into negotiating with Pyongyang over its nuclear ambitions. "It would not be wise to overreact," Japanese Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi told the nation's parliament after the missile test. A South Korean defense official said the missile was launched at 11:51 a.m. local time and fell into the sea 68 miles from the launch site on North Korea's east coast.
NEWS
By PETER WALLSTEN AND JOEL HAVEMANN and PETER WALLSTEN AND JOEL HAVEMANN,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 8, 2006
CHICAGO -- President Bush, pressed yesterday on whether he had been tough enough toward North Korea, defended his search for a diplomatic response to the Communist nation's test-firing of seven missiles this week. In an unusual full-dress news conference outside Washington, D.C., Bush met with reporters in the rotunda of Chicago's Museum of Science and Industry during a trip in which he also went to a 60th-birthday dinner the previous night held by Mayor Richard M. Daley and a fundraiser yesterday for Judy Baar Topinka, the Republican gubernatorial candidate.
NEWS
By David E. Sanger and David E. Sanger,New York Times News Service | June 13, 1993
TOKYO -- While North Korea's negotiators were dragging out the standoff over a nuclear nonproliferation treaty, the Communist government's engineers conducted what appears to be the first successful test of the country's home-grown mid-range missile. Japanese officials fear that the missile could travel as far as some of Japan's most populous cities.The tests, conducted on the Sea of Japan on May 29 and 30, are believed to have involved the Rodong 1, a missile North Korea has been developing for several years and is preparing to export to Iran in return for oil. U.S. intelligence officials have said that the missile is believed to be capable of carrying a payload of chemical weapons or perhaps a small nuclear device.
NEWS
September 13, 2005
HIS POLITICAL party has held power for all but 10 months over the last 50 years. He already is Japan's longest serving prime minister in two decades. And Junichiro Koizumi's ruling Liberal Democratic Party just won its largest mandate since 1986 and, in league with a smaller party, will hold a veto-proof share of the Japanese Parliament's lower house. But now Prime Minister Koizumi has his work cut out for him - work at home and abroad that could have a tremendous impact on the United States.
FEATURES
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder/Tribune | February 22, 1998
RECENTLY, WHILE visiting New York City (civic motto: "I Got Yer Civic Motto Right Here"), I saw an alarming article in the New York Times, which is a newspaper up there, stating that large chunks of masonry were falling off some of the older buildings.As bad luck would have it in such a crowded city, several of these chunks, tragically, failed to land on George Steinbrenner.The Times article quoted experts as saying that the solution to the falling-chunks problem was to inspect old buildings.
NEWS
By PETER WALLSTEN AND JOEL HAVEMANN and PETER WALLSTEN AND JOEL HAVEMANN,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 8, 2006
CHICAGO -- President Bush, pressed yesterday on whether he had been tough enough toward North Korea, defended his search for a diplomatic response to the Communist nation's test-firing of seven missiles this week. In an unusual full-dress news conference outside Washington, D.C., Bush met with reporters in the rotunda of Chicago's Museum of Science and Industry during a trip in which he also went to a 60th-birthday dinner the previous night held by Mayor Richard M. Daley and a fundraiser yesterday for Judy Baar Topinka, the Republican gubernatorial candidate.
NEWS
September 13, 2005
HIS POLITICAL party has held power for all but 10 months over the last 50 years. He already is Japan's longest serving prime minister in two decades. And Junichiro Koizumi's ruling Liberal Democratic Party just won its largest mandate since 1986 and, in league with a smaller party, will hold a veto-proof share of the Japanese Parliament's lower house. But now Prime Minister Koizumi has his work cut out for him - work at home and abroad that could have a tremendous impact on the United States.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | March 11, 2003
TOKYO - Japan and South Korea responded calmly yesterday after North Korea test-fired a second anti-ship missile in as many weeks into the Sea of Japan, in what appeared to be another attempt to rattle the United States into negotiating with Pyongyang over its nuclear ambitions. "It would not be wise to overreact," Japanese Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi told the nation's parliament after the missile test. A South Korean defense official said the missile was launched at 11:51 a.m. local time and fell into the sea 68 miles from the launch site on North Korea's east coast.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | October 4, 2002
NIIGATA, Japan - The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra occasionally gets lost in the translation. Yesterday, musicians couldn't help but chuckle over boarding passes for the flight from Osaka to this industrial port city on the Sea of Japan. They were all identified as members of "Borutemoa Party," the closest, apparently, that airline agents could get to spelling Baltimore. Of course, considering how few Americans can speak Japanese, and how badly they mangle the few words they do attempt, no one would think of casting aspersions.
NEWS
By Russell Working and Russell Working,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 26, 1999
TOYAMA, Japan -- Just outside the port of Toyama-Fushiki is a day parking lot whose owners have grown tired of shooing away would-be buyers of automobiles. So they posted a sign in Russian that reads, "This is a Parking Lot. These Cars are Not for Sale."Errant buyers can be a regular nuisance when Russian ships call at Japanese ports. In Toyama-Fushiki, when the Russian ship visits once a week, dozens of Russian passengers and sailors fan out across town, their pockets stuffed with U.S. $100 bills.
NEWS
By Russell Working and Russell Working,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 25, 1999
VLADIVOSTOK, Russia -- At the end of a bay filled with the sunken hulks of the once mighty Soviet navy, a former military vessel called the Pallada is moored at a private dockyard, waiting to be cut down to scrap.It might be a long wait.Business at the Svatko Ltd. scrap yard should be booming. The bays around Vladivostok, once a closed naval-base city of 700,000 on the Sea of Japan, are filled with rusting battleships, submarines and troop transports -- at least 101 large- and small-tonnage vessels, many sunken.
NEWS
By Russell Working and Russell Working,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 26, 1999
TOYAMA, Japan -- Just outside the port of Toyama-Fushiki is a day parking lot whose owners have grown tired of shooing away would-be buyers of automobiles. So they posted a sign in Russian that reads, "This is a Parking Lot. These Cars are Not for Sale."Errant buyers can be a regular nuisance when Russian ships call at Japanese ports. In Toyama-Fushiki, when the Russian ship visits once a week, dozens of Russian passengers and sailors fan out across town, their pockets stuffed with U.S. $100 bills.
NEWS
By Bruce Wallace and Bruce Wallace,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 17, 2007
TOKYO -- Nine elderly people were crushed to death in an earthquake yesterday off Japan's north coast, a powerful undersea shudder that left 900 others injured while flattening dozens of houses, tearing up highways and causing a small amount of radioactive water to leak from the world's largest nuclear power station into the Sea of Japan. The radioactive leak, which the nuclear plant's owners said posed no health threat but took several hours to discover and report to the public, brought a flurry of criticism.
FEATURES
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder/Tribune | February 22, 1998
RECENTLY, WHILE visiting New York City (civic motto: "I Got Yer Civic Motto Right Here"), I saw an alarming article in the New York Times, which is a newspaper up there, stating that large chunks of masonry were falling off some of the older buildings.As bad luck would have it in such a crowded city, several of these chunks, tragically, failed to land on George Steinbrenner.The Times article quoted experts as saying that the solution to the falling-chunks problem was to inspect old buildings.
NEWS
By David E. Sanger and David E. Sanger,New York Times News Service | June 13, 1993
TOKYO -- While North Korea's negotiators were dragging out the standoff over a nuclear nonproliferation treaty, the Communist government's engineers conducted what appears to be the first successful test of the country's home-grown mid-range missile. Japanese officials fear that the missile could travel as far as some of Japan's most populous cities.The tests, conducted on the Sea of Japan on May 29 and 30, are believed to have involved the Rodong 1, a missile North Korea has been developing for several years and is preparing to export to Iran in return for oil. U.S. intelligence officials have said that the missile is believed to be capable of carrying a payload of chemical weapons or perhaps a small nuclear device.
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