Advertisement
HomeCollectionsSea Level
IN THE NEWS

Sea Level

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | June 26, 2013
Saying climate change is already underway, a panel of scientists is urging Maryland officials to plan to accommodate rising seas of up to 2 feet along the state's shoreline in the next 40 years — and perhaps nearly 6 feet by the end of the century. In a report to be released Wednesday and commissioned by Gov. Martin O'Malley, the group of 21 scientists from Maryland, Virginia and other mid-Atlantic states said recent, more sophisticated studies suggest that sea level is rising faster than forecast just five years ago. With 3,100 miles of bay and ocean coastline, Maryland is vulnerable to a rising sea level, experts say. The state has 450 facilities and about 400 miles of roads and highways in low-lying areas that could experience flooding aggravated by climate change, according to state officials.
ARTICLES BY DATE
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | October 8, 2014
With minor flooding forecast Wednesday morning for Baltimore and elsewhere along the western shore of the Chesapeake Bay, there's a new warning that rising seas are likely to encroach more often and reach farther inland in coming decades. The National Weather Service issued a coastal flooding advisory Tuesday night for Anne Arundel, Calvert and Harford counties and southern Baltimore. Onshore winds combined with higher than normal tides were expected to cause "minor shoreline inundation" in low-lying areas.
Advertisement
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | March 14, 2012
New research indicates that rising sea level from climate change will roughly double the risks of storm-related flooding in coastal communities in Maryland and nationwide. Scientists with Climate Central , an independent nonprofit journalism and research organization, have produced maps showing how even small increases in sea level rise are likely to push storm surges onto shore. They've also published their findings in peer-reviewed journals. In Maryland, past and future global warming nearly doubles the estimated odds of “century” or worse floods occurring within the next 18 years, they say  - meaning floods so high they would historically be expected just once per century.  Elsewhere along the nation's coastline, the risks triple.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | September 15, 2014
Baltimore and Annapolis are likely to suffer serious coastal flooding again before this century is over, and people and property in Ocean City and on the lower Eastern Shore face even greater risks as climate change accelerates sea level rise along Maryland's extensive shoreline, warns a new report. Drawing on new government data and projections, Climate Centra l, a nonprofit research and information group, calculates that 41,000 homes with 55,000 residents in the state are in danger under mid-range sea-level rise projections if storm-driven flooding surges five feet above the high tide line - which it did in the Baltimore area and elsewhere during Tropical Storm Isabel in 2003.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | September 15, 2014
Baltimore and Annapolis are likely to suffer serious coastal flooding again before this century is over, and people and property in Ocean City and on the lower Eastern Shore face even greater risks as climate change accelerates sea level rise along Maryland's extensive shoreline, warns a new report. Drawing on new government data and projections, Climate Centra l, a nonprofit research and information group, calculates that 41,000 homes with 55,000 residents in the state are in danger under mid-range sea-level rise projections if storm-driven flooding surges five feet above the high tide line - which it did in the Baltimore area and elsewhere during Tropical Storm Isabel in 2003.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | December 28, 2012
Declaring that Maryland's coastal areas are increasingly at risk from a rising sea level, Gov. Martin O'Malley has ordered state agencies to weigh the growing risks of flooding in deciding where and how to construct state buildings. "Billions of dollars of investments in public infrastructure will be threatened if the state of Maryland fails to prepare adequately for climate change," he said in Friday's executive order, which calls for avoiding low-lying sites and elevating new or reconstructed state buildings to avert flooding.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | November 12, 1995
RANDLE CLIFF BEACH -- Jonathan and Nanette Sheldon own what most Marylanders only dream about -- a house on the water, with a breathtaking view of Chesapeake Bay.Perched atop an 80-foot cliff in this Calvert County community, the three-bedroom house looks down on passing freighters and geese in flight. On a clear day, you can see the Bay Bridge, more than 20 miles to the north.But in years to come, the Sheldons' house on the water will be in the water. Bit by bit, such coveted waterfront home sites and ecologically rich marshland are vanishing all around the bay, the victims of shoreline erosion.
SPORTS
By Lem Satterfield and Lem Satterfield,SUN STAFF | November 12, 2001
BIG BEAR CITY, Calif. - Adjusting to the altitude of 7,000 feet above sea level here can be like getting nailed by the punch that floored Lennox Lewis seven months ago in South Africa. The man who threw that big right hand, heavyweight champion Hasim Rahman of Baltimore, came to Big Bear to train for his rematch with Lewis. "This was a great decision to come here, to this setting, this altitude," Rahman said late last month. "I was prepared for Johannesburg, and I'm even better prepared for Lewis now."
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | July 30, 2004
Richard A. White wants to live the rest of his life in his waterfront home, which perches at the tip of a filament of land reaching out into Chesapeake Bay and boasts a 50-foot-long veranda with panoramic views of the sunset. It sounds idyllic. But the 60-year-old historian has to drink bottled water because salt water has ruined his well. Whitecaps often froth across his lawn, which has shrunk by about 40 feet in the past 18 years. And during high tides in the fall, he pulls on tall boots, parks his car a block away on high ground and ties a rowboat beside his door, as his century-old house becomes a tiny island unto itself.
NEWS
August 19, 2005
M. FRANCIS TAYLOR, 91, native of Sea Level, formerly of Pasadena, MD, died Tuesday, August 16, 2005, at Snug Harbor in Sea Level, NC. He is survived by two daughters; Susan W. Taylor of Berkeley Springs, WV and Barbara Taylor Foster and husband Grady of Savannah, GA, a sister Alice Marie Taylor Weaver of Medford, NJ, three grandchildren and four great-grandchildren, and four nephews. He was preceded in death by his wife of 62 years, Sallie Ann Taylor, and his parents Mervin Allen Taylor and Lydia Lupton Taylor.
NEWS
August 29, 2014
Commentator Dan Ervin's recent discussion of the region's need for nuclear power argues that green alternatives such as wind and solar power can't adequately meet our energy needs ( "The nuclear option Aug. 26). He goes on to describe how green nuclear power is and how it won't contribute to global warming by contributing to carbon dioxide emissions. OK, I'll buy that. But isn't one of the most established facts about global warming the rise in sea levels we've already experience right here in the Chesapeake Bay?
TRAVEL
By Karen Nitkin, For The Baltimore Sun | June 26, 2014
Tim and Julie Rivenbark had a house, two kids and jobs they loved. But the Howard County couple also had a yearning for more experiences and fewer things. "We were doing what we thought was the American dream," says Tim Rivenbark. It took a couple of years for the sensible, responsible Rivenbarks to throw caution to the wind and make the decision to leave behind the familiar and embark on an adventurous yearlong quest to see the world. Over the past several weeks, the couple sold their house and cars.
NEWS
Editorial from The Aegis | May 27, 2014
After a winter like the one that seems like it ended only a few days ago, it's natural for conversations to turn to matters relating to when it's good policy to close schools because of snow, ice or some other inclement weather. The starting point in making such decisions always should be that it is bad public policy to put children at heightened risk of injury, or worse, and it's better to err on the side of caution than to risk safety in the name of preventing the loss of a snow day. Invariably, however, geography comes into play.
NEWS
May 22, 2014
Maryland's coastal zones are the lifeblood of our state and especially vulnerable to sea level. That's why the terrifying news of the collapse of the West Antarctic ice sheet melt hits particularly close to home ( "Historic sites face climate threats ," May 19). Scientists have referred to the West Antarctic ice collapse as a "tipping point" in global climate change. This collapse is not only irreversible but could have a domino effect on the entire ice sheet, raising sea level by three times what has already melted.
FEATURES
By Tim Wheeler and The Baltimore Sun | May 6, 2014
Maryland and the rest of the Northeast face more heat waves and smog, heavier downpours and storm-driven flooding that could damage Baltimore's port, according to a new report released by the Obama administration. The third   National Climate Assessment , drawing on new research findings over the past four years, concludes that climate change is already occurring, impacting virtually every region and key sectors of the U.S. economy. The White House and environmental groups said the assessment underscores the need to do more to curtail climate-altering emissions, while also preparing to adapt to the unavoidable impacts of changes already under way. The report comes at a time when the Obama administration faces growing political pressure over the Keystone XL pipeline, with   Congress   considering approving it after the administration delayed its decision on the project amid intense opposition from environmentalists.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | June 26, 2013
Saying climate change is already underway, a panel of scientists is urging Maryland officials to plan to accommodate rising seas of up to 2 feet along the state's shoreline in the next 40 years — and perhaps nearly 6 feet by the end of the century. In a report to be released Wednesday and commissioned by Gov. Martin O'Malley, the group of 21 scientists from Maryland, Virginia and other mid-Atlantic states said recent, more sophisticated studies suggest that sea level is rising faster than forecast just five years ago. With 3,100 miles of bay and ocean coastline, Maryland is vulnerable to a rising sea level, experts say. The state has 450 facilities and about 400 miles of roads and highways in low-lying areas that could experience flooding aggravated by climate change, according to state officials.
NEWS
By Tom Horton | February 13, 2012
Sea level around the Chesapeake Bay is rising. Larger-than-ever storm surges are a certainty. Land is sinking further. The time has come to plan an orderly human retreat from more development along the watershed's low-lying edges. The science that backs this advice gets drowned out when developers wave big money at county officials craving revenue. A classic "lose-lose" - for the environment and for taxpayers - results. The most recent example comes from Virginia's Northumberland County Board of Supervisors.
NEWS
By TIMOTHY B. WHEELER | October 28, 2008
Global climate change could undermine efforts to restore the Chesapeake Bay by flooding coastal areas and washing more pollution into the water, a new scientific report warns. The report, issued yesterday by the federal bay program office in Annapolis, notes that scientists have detected significant increases in sea level and bay water temperature over the past century. Further changes are likely, the report says, especially if current emissions of greenhouse gases continue unabated. Coastal flooding is likely if sea level rises 2 to 5 feet, as climate-change models project, the report says.
NEWS
April 2, 2013
Thanks for your article on climate change and rising sea levels ("Survey shows Americans wary of sea level rising," March 29.) Global warming is driving major change in sea levels. In 2001, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, the world's leading authority on climate science, projected an annual sea level rise of less than 2 millimeters per year. But from 1993 through 2006, the oceans actually rose 3.3 millimeters per year, more than 50 percent above projections, according to Scientific American magazine.
SPORTS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | January 9, 2013
Jimmy Smith knew it was real the first time he walked up the big hill to football practice, his 18-year-old lungs unable to find enough air. In the years that followed, the images of husky linemen, gasping on the sidelines, only confirmed the potency of Colorado's thin, Rocky Mountain air. The Ravens cornerback played at the University of Colorado in Boulder, which sits about a mile above sea level. That's almost exactly the same elevation he and his teammates will encounter at Denver's Sports Authority Field on Saturday when they try to keep their season alive in an AFC divisional-round playoff game against the top-seeded Broncos.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.