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NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | October 24, 2003
WASHINGTON - The Arctic is warming at an accelerating pace, scientists say, and the consequences won't be limited to the top of the world. A new report on NASA satellite observations over the past 20 years says average summertime temperatures in the Arctic have climbed about 2.2 degrees Fahrenheit each decade since 1981. By comparison, it has taken global temperatures a century to increase about 1 degree. And the pace is quickening. The Arctic warming has been eight times faster in the past two decades than it was over the past century, according to the study by Josefino Comiso, a research scientist at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt.
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NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | October 17, 2012
Each month this year, climate data have shown one of the warmest starts to any year on record, and that continued in September across the country and state and in Baltimore. Across the contiguous U.S., January through September was the warmest first nine months of a calendar year on record, with an average temperature of 59.8 degrees. The average temperature in September was 67 degrees, tying September 1980 as the 23rd warmest on record. In 25 states, including Maryland, it has been the warmest start to a year on record.
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NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | December 3, 1999
The icecap at the top of the world is melting, and people appear to be at least partly to blame.An expanse of sea ice the size of Maryland and Delaware -- more than 14,000 square miles on average -- has been lost each year since 1978, according to a report today by U.S., British and Russian scientists in the journal Science.Natural climate change alone can't easily explain the melting, and evidence is that global warming, driven by fossil-fuel combustion and air pollution, might be overriding long-term natural cycles.
NEWS
By Waleed Abdalati | November 19, 2009
Last month, 360 miles above the Earth, a little-noticed light went dark. It was the third and final laser on NASA's Ice, Cloud and Land Elevation Satellite (ICESat), developed and managed by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt. For the last 6 1/2 years, ICESat has been using precise laser measurements to determine how much the Greenland and Antarctica ice sheets are contributing to the rise of the global seas and how much the sea ice that blankets the Arctic Ocean is thinning in ways that can affect climate all over the world.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 16, 1998
Weather satellites operating over an 18-year period have revealed an increase in the ice covering Antarctic waters and a decrease in Arctic sea ice.This asymmetric trend, a team of scientists says, is consistent with one theory of what would happen if a gradual increase of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere were causing global warming.Results of the satellite investigation by Dr. Donald J. Cavalieri and his colleagues at the Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, were published recently in the journal Nature.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun reporter | September 22, 2006
Something unusual is going on in the Beaufort Sea, a remote part of the Arctic Ocean north of Alaska. Over the past six weeks, a huge "lake" bigger than the state of Indiana has melted out of the sea ice. Within the past week, this "polynya" - a Russian word for any open water surrounded by sea ice - finally melted through a part of the ice that separated it from the open ocean, forming a kind of bay in the planet's northern ice cap. "The reason we're...
NEWS
By Kassie Siegel | January 10, 2007
On Dec. 27, Interior Secretary Dirk Kempthorne announced a proposal to list the polar bear as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act because of the loss of its sea ice habitat from global warming. This proposal marks the first legally binding admission by the Bush administration of the reality of global warming. The significance of the polar bear decision has not been missed by those who stand to benefit from a continuation of the administration's head-in-the-sand approach to global warming.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 29, 2005
. The floating cap of sea ice on the Arctic Ocean shrank this summer to what is probably its smallest size in at least a century, continuing a trend toward less summer ice, a team of climate experts reported yesterday. That shift is hard to explain without attributing it in part to human-caused global warming, they and other experts on the region said. The change also appears to be becoming self-sustaining: the increased open water absorbs solar energy that would otherwise be reflected back into space by bright white ice, said Ted A. Scambos, a scientist at the National Snow and Ice Data Center in Boulder, Colo.
SPORTS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | March 18, 2000
Baltimore's Dan Dent and three other rookie mushers drove their teams out of the bleak Alaskan outpost of Shaktoolik together yesterday, headed for Koyuk, 50 miles away across treacherous Bering Sea ice. The little convoy of four sleds and 45 dogs was still 229 miles and five checkpoints from the Iditarod Trail race's finish line in Nome. Bunching up before trying to cross the sea ice is a tactic often urged on Iditarod mushers, especially the inexperienced. For 35 miles of the run to Koyuk, the mushers must turn off the beach and cross open sea ice marked only by stakes and spruce boughs stuck into the snow.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | October 17, 2012
Each month this year, climate data have shown one of the warmest starts to any year on record, and that continued in September across the country and state and in Baltimore. Across the contiguous U.S., January through September was the warmest first nine months of a calendar year on record, with an average temperature of 59.8 degrees. The average temperature in September was 67 degrees, tying September 1980 as the 23rd warmest on record. In 25 states, including Maryland, it has been the warmest start to a year on record.
NEWS
By Tim Wheeler and Tim Wheeler,tim.wheeler@baltsun.com | April 12, 2009
The Arctic is warming, and the sea ice is thinner than anyone has seen before. That could spell trouble for walruses, sea ducks and a host of other species - including humans - that depend on the North to sustain them. An international team of researchers, including some from Maryland, spent much of March aboard a Coast Guard icebreaker in the Bering Sea, gathering evidence that might help explain what's happening there. Enduring fierce winds and temperatures that dipped to minus 10 degrees Fahrenheit at times, they sampled the ice off the coast of Alaska, scooped up clams and other creatures from the sea bottom and scouted by helicopter across the vast white landscape to find and tag walruses.
NEWS
By Kassie Siegel | January 10, 2007
On Dec. 27, Interior Secretary Dirk Kempthorne announced a proposal to list the polar bear as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act because of the loss of its sea ice habitat from global warming. This proposal marks the first legally binding admission by the Bush administration of the reality of global warming. The significance of the polar bear decision has not been missed by those who stand to benefit from a continuation of the administration's head-in-the-sand approach to global warming.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun reporter | September 22, 2006
Something unusual is going on in the Beaufort Sea, a remote part of the Arctic Ocean north of Alaska. Over the past six weeks, a huge "lake" bigger than the state of Indiana has melted out of the sea ice. Within the past week, this "polynya" - a Russian word for any open water surrounded by sea ice - finally melted through a part of the ice that separated it from the open ocean, forming a kind of bay in the planet's northern ice cap. "The reason we're...
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 29, 2005
. The floating cap of sea ice on the Arctic Ocean shrank this summer to what is probably its smallest size in at least a century, continuing a trend toward less summer ice, a team of climate experts reported yesterday. That shift is hard to explain without attributing it in part to human-caused global warming, they and other experts on the region said. The change also appears to be becoming self-sustaining: the increased open water absorbs solar energy that would otherwise be reflected back into space by bright white ice, said Ted A. Scambos, a scientist at the National Snow and Ice Data Center in Boulder, Colo.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | October 24, 2003
WASHINGTON - The Arctic is warming at an accelerating pace, scientists say, and the consequences won't be limited to the top of the world. A new report on NASA satellite observations over the past 20 years says average summertime temperatures in the Arctic have climbed about 2.2 degrees Fahrenheit each decade since 1981. By comparison, it has taken global temperatures a century to increase about 1 degree. And the pace is quickening. The Arctic warming has been eight times faster in the past two decades than it was over the past century, according to the study by Josefino Comiso, a research scientist at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt.
NEWS
By Usha Lee McFarling and Usha Lee McFarling,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 1, 2003
RESOLUTE, Nunavut - For 500 years, explorers nudged their ships through these Arctic waters, vainly seeking a shortcut to the riches of the East. The Northwest Passage, a deadly maze of sea ice, narrow straits and misshapen islands, still holds the traces of those who failed. There are feeble cairns, skeletons lying face down where explorers fell, makeshift camps piled high with cannibalized bones and, on one rocky spit, a trio of wind-scoured tombstones. Whole expeditions, hundreds of men and entire ships, are missing to this day. The first explorer to survive a crossing, in 1906, spent several winters trapped by ice. Despite that - or maybe because of it - Canadian Mountie Ken Burton wanted nothing more than to join the pantheon of polar explorers who had threaded their ships through the passage's narrow ice leads and around its shimmering blue-green icebergs.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 18, 1996
INACCESSIBLE ISLAND, Antarctica -- The Emperor penguins, rising from the depths, levitate into the blue glow of an air hole in the ice.No single creature more embodies the popular image of Antarctica than these droll birds dressed by nature for every formal occasion. But the Emperors' underwater behavior while foraging is a wonder normally denied to naturalists. The water in which they gambol is cold enough to quickly kill an unprotected human. An 8-foot-thick crust of ice hides the birds' activities from the surface.
NEWS
By Usha Lee McFarling and Usha Lee McFarling,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 27, 2002
YANRAKYNNOT, Russia - The native elders have no explanation. Scientists are perplexed as well. The icy realm of the Eskimo - the tundra and ice of Russia, Alaska, Canada and Greenland - has started to thaw. Strange portents are everywhere. Thunder and lightning, once rare, have become commonplace. An eerie warm wind blows in from the south. Hunters who prided themselves on their ability to read the sky say they no longer can predict the sudden blizzards. "The Earth," one hunter concludes, "is turning faster."
NEWS
By Usha Lee McFarling and Usha Lee McFarling,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 27, 2002
YANRAKYNNOT, Russia - The native elders have no explanation. Scientists are perplexed as well. The icy realm of the Eskimo - the tundra and ice of Russia, Alaska, Canada and Greenland - has started to thaw. Strange portents are everywhere. Thunder and lightning, once rare, have become commonplace. An eerie warm wind blows in from the south. Hunters who prided themselves on their ability to read the sky say they no longer can predict the sudden blizzards. "The Earth," one hunter concludes, "is turning faster."
SPORTS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | March 18, 2000
Baltimore's Dan Dent and three other rookie mushers drove their teams out of the bleak Alaskan outpost of Shaktoolik together yesterday, headed for Koyuk, 50 miles away across treacherous Bering Sea ice. The little convoy of four sleds and 45 dogs was still 229 miles and five checkpoints from the Iditarod Trail race's finish line in Nome. Bunching up before trying to cross the sea ice is a tactic often urged on Iditarod mushers, especially the inexperienced. For 35 miles of the run to Koyuk, the mushers must turn off the beach and cross open sea ice marked only by stakes and spruce boughs stuck into the snow.
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