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TRAVEL
By Sheila Young, Special to The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | March 24, 2011
Where to look in Maryland Head east. The Chesapeake Bay's eastern beaches are better than those on the west side, but local collectors have found good pieces where the Potomac River empties into the bay. Do research . Check with local historical societies to find towns, ports or docks that were active 50-100+ years ago. Pay attention to prevailing winds. Shorelines that receive those winds will normally produce the best sea glass. Check nautical charts.
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TRAVEL
By Sheila Young, Special to The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | March 24, 2011
Where to look in Maryland Head east. The Chesapeake Bay's eastern beaches are better than those on the west side, but local collectors have found good pieces where the Potomac River empties into the bay. Do research . Check with local historical societies to find towns, ports or docks that were active 50-100+ years ago. Pay attention to prevailing winds. Shorelines that receive those winds will normally produce the best sea glass. Check nautical charts.
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NEWS
December 14, 2008
Bay Foundation hosts charity book signing The Chesapeake Bay Foundation will hold a Coastal Christmas Charity Book Signing Bash from 2 p.m. to 6 p.m. Sunday at its headquarters, 6 Herndon Ave., Annapolis. Maryland authors Richard LaMotte (Pure Sea Glass), Deacon Ritterbush (A Beachcomber's Odyssey) and Margaret Caruthers (Beach Stones), will sign copies of their books. Ritterbush will give a lecture at 3 p.m. on Beachcombing on the Shores of the Chesapeake Bay. Photographers Celia Pearson and Megan Lloyd also will attend.
TRAVEL
By Sheila Young, Special to The Baltimore Sun | March 24, 2011
On the wave-tossed banks of the Eastern Shore, treasure washes onto the sand every day —ordinary glass thrown into the water decades ago, where it was broken and beaten by the sea for years, emerging finally as rare and beautiful "sea glass. " Some call sea glass "Tears of the Mermaids," and once you see its luminous glow against the sand, you understand why. My interest began last October, when my sister and niece proposed a sea-glass hunt at Tolchester Beach near Chestertown on the Eastern Shore.
NEWS
By Kellie Woodhouse and Kellie Woodhouse,kellie.woodhouse@baltsun.com | April 12, 2009
In her Annapolis home, nestled against the Chesapeake Bay, Deacon Ritterbush can point to the many small treasures she's found while sifting through sand on beaches nearby and around the world. Since she was 3 years old, Ritterbush has been drawn to the water's edge, pocketing sea glass, seashells, old bottles, driftwood, snail shells, quartz stone and sand dollars. Now 57 and with nearly a lifetime of discoveries in the sand that she likens to lessons in life, Ritterbush has begun sharing her love of beachcombing with others.
NEWS
By ELAINE MARKOUTSAS and ELAINE MARKOUTSAS,UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE | July 23, 2006
Several hundred feet beneath the ocean's surface and woven throughout tropical reefs, live coral is one of nature's brightest lights. Its branches create a vivid curtain for brilliantly hued fish: impressive architecture that is built at the snail's pace of less than an inch a year. In a color range most often associated with fiery red-orange through salmon and pink tones, the coral hue long has attracted those who revel in warm, robust surroundings in the home. Now, in addition to the colors of coral, images from the reef also can be found in fashion and home decor.
TRAVEL
By Sheila Young, Special to The Baltimore Sun | March 24, 2011
On the wave-tossed banks of the Eastern Shore, treasure washes onto the sand every day —ordinary glass thrown into the water decades ago, where it was broken and beaten by the sea for years, emerging finally as rare and beautiful "sea glass. " Some call sea glass "Tears of the Mermaids," and once you see its luminous glow against the sand, you understand why. My interest began last October, when my sister and niece proposed a sea-glass hunt at Tolchester Beach near Chestertown on the Eastern Shore.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Marriam Shah, The Baltimore Sun | June 21, 2010
This weekend and next, celebrate the history of Lewes, Del. Surrounded by nature and the sounds of the ocean and bay, Lewes is a walking town filled with museums showcasing its history, as well as unusual shops and preserved architecture. Garden Festival This Saturday, Lewes will hold its annual Garden Tour. It consists of eight private gardens and a public one, but there is more to see than just the greenery. During the day, a series of garden-related lectures will take place.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | November 8, 2004
ROCK HALL - The tide is low, the sun is setting, and Richard LaMotte is ready for the hunt. He pulls his Toyota Land Cruiser up to the secluded beach, laces up his boots and takes out two large plastic bags. One is for his wife, Nancy - she will want the ruby reds, the rare cobalt blues, the extinct purples. The other is for his own collection of treasures tossed into the sea long ago. LaMotte is a sea glass hunter - one of several hundred Maryland collectors who comb the sands for castoffs that tides and time have shaped into coveted, frosted shards.
NEWS
December 28, 2008
HAR-CO names Lisa Taylor HR manager HAR-CO Maryland Federal Credit Union has named Lisa Taylor its human resources manager/compliance officer. She has more than 10 years experience in human resources in the service industry. Her responsibilities will include staff recruitment and training, benefits administration, policy development, compliance and employee relations. She will work out of HAR-CO's Bel Air headquarters. Maritime Museum The Havre de Grace Maritime Museum's What Knots gift shop offers a variety of items for the holidays and special occasions year-round.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Marriam Shah, The Baltimore Sun | June 21, 2010
This weekend and next, celebrate the history of Lewes, Del. Surrounded by nature and the sounds of the ocean and bay, Lewes is a walking town filled with museums showcasing its history, as well as unusual shops and preserved architecture. Garden Festival This Saturday, Lewes will hold its annual Garden Tour. It consists of eight private gardens and a public one, but there is more to see than just the greenery. During the day, a series of garden-related lectures will take place.
NEWS
By Kellie Woodhouse and Kellie Woodhouse,kellie.woodhouse@baltsun.com | April 12, 2009
In her Annapolis home, nestled against the Chesapeake Bay, Deacon Ritterbush can point to the many small treasures she's found while sifting through sand on beaches nearby and around the world. Since she was 3 years old, Ritterbush has been drawn to the water's edge, pocketing sea glass, seashells, old bottles, driftwood, snail shells, quartz stone and sand dollars. Now 57 and with nearly a lifetime of discoveries in the sand that she likens to lessons in life, Ritterbush has begun sharing her love of beachcombing with others.
NEWS
December 14, 2008
Bay Foundation hosts charity book signing The Chesapeake Bay Foundation will hold a Coastal Christmas Charity Book Signing Bash from 2 p.m. to 6 p.m. Sunday at its headquarters, 6 Herndon Ave., Annapolis. Maryland authors Richard LaMotte (Pure Sea Glass), Deacon Ritterbush (A Beachcomber's Odyssey) and Margaret Caruthers (Beach Stones), will sign copies of their books. Ritterbush will give a lecture at 3 p.m. on Beachcombing on the Shores of the Chesapeake Bay. Photographers Celia Pearson and Megan Lloyd also will attend.
NEWS
By ELAINE MARKOUTSAS and ELAINE MARKOUTSAS,UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE | July 23, 2006
Several hundred feet beneath the ocean's surface and woven throughout tropical reefs, live coral is one of nature's brightest lights. Its branches create a vivid curtain for brilliantly hued fish: impressive architecture that is built at the snail's pace of less than an inch a year. In a color range most often associated with fiery red-orange through salmon and pink tones, the coral hue long has attracted those who revel in warm, robust surroundings in the home. Now, in addition to the colors of coral, images from the reef also can be found in fashion and home decor.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | November 8, 2004
ROCK HALL - The tide is low, the sun is setting, and Richard LaMotte is ready for the hunt. He pulls his Toyota Land Cruiser up to the secluded beach, laces up his boots and takes out two large plastic bags. One is for his wife, Nancy - she will want the ruby reds, the rare cobalt blues, the extinct purples. The other is for his own collection of treasures tossed into the sea long ago. LaMotte is a sea glass hunter - one of several hundred Maryland collectors who comb the sands for castoffs that tides and time have shaped into coveted, frosted shards.
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | June 17, 2005
SMITH ISLAND - The progger moves rapidly, half-crouched, head down, focused on the muddy, shell-strewn edge of a Chesapeake marsh as intently as any stalking heron. When he stoops, you never know what he'll come up with: a china teacup fragment from a 19th-century sea captain's wife; a medicine bottle tossed by an 18th-century British naval invader; a coin or ring dropped by a 17th-century explorer; a stone point fired 10,000 years ago by a native hunter. "Color's what we're lookin' for," says Timothy T. Marshall of Smith Island.
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