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By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | March 27, 2013
It started as the kind of delivery Pat Schoenberger, an Annapolis sea captain, had made many times: Pick up a client's motor sailboat, ferry it to Florida and return home in a few weeks' time. A brilliant morning sky beckoned as Schoenberger and Jim Southward, his friend and first mate, left Severn, Va., for Pensacola, Fla. Thirty-eight hours later, a Coast Guard helicopter rescued them off Cape Lookout, N.C., amid pounding rain, 55-knot winds, 30-foot waves and the sensation, Southward said, that the ocean was tossing their 15-ton craft, Andante II, "like a cork in a hot tub. " What happened in between was a story of how, even in an era of high-tech sea mapping and navigation, the wisdom of seasoned mariners still can be no match for an angry sea. Schoenberger, 38, and Southward, 40, seemed dazed and relieved in an interview as they sifted the choices they'd made along the way, including the one no sailor wants to make: to declare Mayday, call for rescue and abandon ship.
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NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | March 27, 2013
It started as the kind of delivery Pat Schoenberger, an Annapolis sea captain, had made many times: Pick up a client's motor sailboat, ferry it to Florida and return home in a few weeks' time. A brilliant morning sky beckoned as Schoenberger and Jim Southward, his friend and first mate, left Severn, Va., for Pensacola, Fla. Thirty-eight hours later, a Coast Guard helicopter rescued them off Cape Lookout, N.C., amid pounding rain, 55-knot winds, 30-foot waves and the sensation, Southward said, that the ocean was tossing their 15-ton craft, Andante II, "like a cork in a hot tub. " What happened in between was a story of how, even in an era of high-tech sea mapping and navigation, the wisdom of seasoned mariners still can be no match for an angry sea. Schoenberger, 38, and Southward, 40, seemed dazed and relieved in an interview as they sifted the choices they'd made along the way, including the one no sailor wants to make: to declare Mayday, call for rescue and abandon ship.
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FEATURES
By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | July 29, 2011
A knock rarely brings the owner to the front door of Stemmer House. It is more likely that she will emerge to greet you from her gardens, wearing her trademark galoshes, tool belt, work gloves and sun hat. Though Barbara Holdridge has lived in this historic Baltimore County home for nearly 40 years, it is her gardens that demand her time and attention. More than six of the 27 acres that surround the home are formally landscaped, and if they don't need to be weeded, they need to be watered.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | July 29, 2011
A knock rarely brings the owner to the front door of Stemmer House. It is more likely that she will emerge to greet you from her gardens, wearing her trademark galoshes, tool belt, work gloves and sun hat. Though Barbara Holdridge has lived in this historic Baltimore County home for nearly 40 years, it is her gardens that demand her time and attention. More than six of the 27 acres that surround the home are formally landscaped, and if they don't need to be weeded, they need to be watered.
ENTERTAINMENT
By TIM SMITH and TIM SMITH,tim.smith@baltsun.com | March 26, 2009
Many an uncomfortable lesson about human nature lies within Benjamin Britten's 1945 operatic masterpiece, Peter Grimes, a tale of small-mindedness, conclusion-jumping and rapid swells of populist outrage in a seaside village. Those multilayered messages seem even more relevant than usual in the Washington National Opera's striking production at the Kennedy Center. The sight of villagers brandishing prayer books as they march off to confront the outsider Grimes, singing about how they "shall strike and strike to kill," bring to mind many an outbreak of knee-jerk, cable-TV-flamed behavior in our own society.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | May 25, 1993
WILMINGTON, Del. -- The case of Philadelphia's missing ash may have been solved at last.The captain of the Khian Sea, the ill-fated cargo ship that roamed the world looking for a way to dispose of 11,000 tons of incinerator ash, said yesterday that he dumped it into the pTC Atlantic and Indian oceans on the direct orders of his boss, a businessman from Annapolis.The Khian Sea created an international furor between 1986 and 1988 as it haplessly traveled to at least 11 countries on four continents in a vain attempt to legally dispose of Philadelphia's ash. During the odyssey, the ship was turned away at gunpoint at two ports, the crew almost mutinied, and its engineer threatened to scuttle the vessel and was also tossed into jail.
NEWS
February 2, 2000
George McTurnan Kahin, 82, a Cornell University professor and author who was one of the nation's leading scholars of Southeast Asia, died Saturday in Ithaca, N.Y. David Levy, 87, the former network executive who created "The Addams Family" television comedy, died Jan. 25 in Los Angeles. Rudolph W. Patzert, 88, a sea captain who broke through the British blockade of Palestine to move Holocaust survivors to their historic homeland after World War II, died Jan. 21 in Encinitas, Calif. He had battled melanoma.
FEATURES
By Harry Wessel and Harry Wessel,Knight Ridder/Tribune | November 1, 1998
"The Hundred Days," by Patrick O'Brian. Norton. 288 pages. $24. Just the arrival of "The Hundred Days," the 19th book in the Aubrey-Maturin series, is unadulterated joy for fans of Patrick O'Brian. It's been nearly two years since O'Brian's last entry, "The Yellow Admiral," and the octagenarian's loyal readers feared the series might be at its end.It's not. In fact, a 20th book is promised for the long-running, high-brow buddy adventure that follows sea captain Jack Aubrey and naval surgeon/spy Stephen Maturin during the Napoleonic Wars of the early 19th century.
NEWS
August 13, 2002
Hilliard Dale O'Day Sr., a retired Bethlehem Steel Corp. millwright who enjoyed sailing, died Aug. 6 of complications from a stroke at a San Diego hospital. The former Essex resident was 84. A Baltimore native and son of a sea captain, Mr. O'Day spent the first five years of his life aboard his father's ship, the Lydia Middleton, one of the last of the three-masted freight-hauling schooners. "His father's ship transported lumber, fertilizer and licorice root from Haiti to a plant in Baltimore for processing," said son Hilliard D. O'Day Jr. of Bel Air. After quitting the sea, the captain went to work for Bethlehem Steel at Sparrows Point, and his son, after graduating from Sparrows Point High School, also worked there until enlisting in the Navy during World War II. He served as a gunner's mate aboard a minesweeper, the YMS-83, in the North African and Mediterranean campaigns.
SPORTS
By KEVIN VAN VALKENBERG | March 29, 2007
Australia has always been the land of possibility, as well as new beginnings. The country, after all, was originally populated by criminals, most of them convicted of petty crimes (think Jean Valjean) and shipped from England or Ireland between 1788 and 1868 to help prison overcrowding. Such an interesting, complicated, ancestry somehow lay the groundwork for a culture that can be both delicate and beautiful, yet manly and roguish, all at the same time. Only Australia could produce such divergent Oscar winners as Cate Blanchett and Mel Gibson.
ENTERTAINMENT
By TIM SMITH and TIM SMITH,tim.smith@baltsun.com | March 26, 2009
Many an uncomfortable lesson about human nature lies within Benjamin Britten's 1945 operatic masterpiece, Peter Grimes, a tale of small-mindedness, conclusion-jumping and rapid swells of populist outrage in a seaside village. Those multilayered messages seem even more relevant than usual in the Washington National Opera's striking production at the Kennedy Center. The sight of villagers brandishing prayer books as they march off to confront the outsider Grimes, singing about how they "shall strike and strike to kill," bring to mind many an outbreak of knee-jerk, cable-TV-flamed behavior in our own society.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | May 25, 1993
WILMINGTON, Del. -- The case of Philadelphia's missing ash may have been solved at last.The captain of the Khian Sea, the ill-fated cargo ship that roamed the world looking for a way to dispose of 11,000 tons of incinerator ash, said yesterday that he dumped it into the pTC Atlantic and Indian oceans on the direct orders of his boss, a businessman from Annapolis.The Khian Sea created an international furor between 1986 and 1988 as it haplessly traveled to at least 11 countries on four continents in a vain attempt to legally dispose of Philadelphia's ash. During the odyssey, the ship was turned away at gunpoint at two ports, the crew almost mutinied, and its engineer threatened to scuttle the vessel and was also tossed into jail.
NEWS
April 20, 2003
On an earlier Easter Sunday -- April 5, 1722 -- a Dutch sea captain, Jacob Roggeveen, landed on an isolated island in the South Pacific, 2,300 miles from Chile and about the size of Washington, D.C. He called his find Easter Island, and it has been a source of fascination ever since because of its giant stone statues from long ago. Its orginal inhabitants were thought to be Polynesian, and it is known as Rapa Nui in that language. The stone monoliths can be as tall as 60 feet but average about 13 feet and weigh 14 tons.
NEWS
April 14, 1998
Glen Frazier Leet, 89, former president of the Save the Children Foundation and the United Nation's first chief of community development, died April 7 at his home in Manhattan.With his wife, Mildred Robbins Leet, he founded Trickle Up, a program that offered small grants for people to start small businesses. The program is estimated to have helped 350,000 people in 115 nations and is estimated to have spawned 67,500 enterprises.Forrest E. Fickling, 72, author and creator of the Honey West series of detective novels that became a TV show in the 1960s, died April 3 of a brain tumor in a Laguna Hills, Calif.
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