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NEWS
April 13, 2013
Kudos to the nonprofit Pride of Baltimore, Inc. for showing kids that learning can be fun, as was apparent in the published photographs ("Pride II takes to the bay as a floating classroom," April 11). But there was something blatantly missing - life jackets! Let's be sure to also use these learning excursions to teach the importance of water safety. Terry Callanan, Catonsville
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SPORTS
By Edward Lee and The Baltimore Sun | October 9, 2014
Salisbury's 37-34 overtime upset of then-No. 6 St. John Fisher last Saturday was punctuated by senior fullback J.D. Hook's 16-yard touchdown run. But the running game has been powering the offense all season. The Sea Gulls (2-2 overall and 1-1 in the Empire 8 Athletic Conference) have averaged 289.8 rushing yards thus far, seventh-best in Division III. They compiled 312 rushing yards against a Cardinals defense that had surrendered an average of 288.7 total yards prior to Saturday's contest.
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SPORTS
By Jean Marbella and The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2014
No man is an island perhaps, but Ben Savage was quite a lonely speck of Tiger blue in the sea of Oriole orange at Camden Yards on Thursday. Savage was a long way from his hometown, but not so far from his adopted town of Ellicott City. He moved to the area in 2003 as an intelligence specialist for the Navy and brought his love for the Tigers. "There was lots of anxiety until Saturday," said Savage, 39. That's when his team finally clinched a postseason berth. "We didn't know if they were going to play so I waited to get tickets.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | October 8, 2014
With minor flooding forecast Wednesday morning for Baltimore and elsewhere along the western shore of the Chesapeake Bay, there's a new warning that rising seas are likely to encroach more often and reach farther inland in coming decades. The National Weather Service issued a coastal flooding advisory Tuesday night for Anne Arundel, Calvert and Harford counties and southern Baltimore. Onshore winds combined with higher than normal tides were expected to cause "minor shoreline inundation" in low-lying areas.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa, The Baltimore Sun | May 14, 2010
British songstress Corinne Bailey Rae burst into the pop charts like a bright ray of sunshine with her breezy 2006 single "Put Your Records On." Her self-titled debut, which featured the song, would go on to sell millions in the U.S. Rae's latest album, "The Sea," is a complete about-face, filled with darker, more complicated songs and imagery. In 2008, Rae's husband, Jason, died of an accidental overdose of methadone and alcohol. Rae withdrew from songwriting and performing for about a year, before re-emerging to finish "The Sea," which was released in January.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | June 25, 2012
Sea levels are rising faster along the Atlantic coast - including in the Chesapeake Bay - than elsewhere around the world, and the increase appears to be accelerating, according to federal scientists. In a paper published online in Nature Climate Change , the U.S. Geological Survey reports that sea level rise is increasing three to four times faster than globally along a heavily-populated 600-mile stretch of coast from Cape  Hatteras, NC to north of Boston.  Since 1990, the rise has increased 2 to 3.7 millimeters per year in the "hotspot," as the federal scientists call it, compared with a global increase of 0.6 to 1 millimeter per year.  That hotspot includes the Chesapeake Bay, according to USGS oceanographer Asbury H. Sallenger, lead author of the report.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Dorsey | July 2, 1998
"A Passion for Life," the current exhibit at Quiet Waters Galleries in Annapolis, celebrates the beauty of the sea and its life through the works of its two artists. Bobbie Burnett, of Annapolis, creates stained glass sculptures in two and three dimensions of fish, birds and mammals, such as the heron seen here. They depict life in and over the sea. Andre Laban, a French painter who worked for years with undersea explorer Jacques Cousteau, depicts the sea as seen from above and below the surface.
NEWS
By Stephen Vicchio | August 25, 1992
If there is magic to be found on this planet, it is contained in water.7+ -- Loren Eiseley, "The Immense Journey"BY THE time the screen door swings back to make its thud, already I have bounded down the wooden steps. A moment later, on the path leading over the dune line, I pass stubborn tufts of saw grass hedged in by battered snow fences.I cover the hundred yards of sand between dune line and ocean like a weary man finishing a desert crossing. Then, an awkward dive, the shock of cold water, a few strokes to move me beyond the breakers, and I am over taken, consumed, returned to the sea.I hear the ocean's surfy, slow, deep mellow voice.
NEWS
January 6, 1992
"You can't stop the tides and wind," said Ocean City Mayor Roland "Fish" Powell philosophically after Saturday's nor'easter of near-hurricane force blasted his resort town. The strong gales and pounding waves washed away the protective dunes and left Ocean City vulnerable to the next unpredictable storm that meanders up the coast.Such is life on a barrier island. Maryland's popular resort community fared pretty well from this nor'easter. The beach took a shellacking, there was considerable flooding and many homes near the ocean got clobbered.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | March 27, 2013
It started as the kind of delivery Pat Schoenberger, an Annapolis sea captain, had made many times: Pick up a client's motor sailboat, ferry it to Florida and return home in a few weeks' time. A brilliant morning sky beckoned as Schoenberger and Jim Southward, his friend and first mate, left Severn, Va., for Pensacola, Fla. Thirty-eight hours later, a Coast Guard helicopter rescued them off Cape Lookout, N.C., amid pounding rain, 55-knot winds, 30-foot waves and the sensation, Southward said, that the ocean was tossing their 15-ton craft, Andante II, "like a cork in a hot tub. " What happened in between was a story of how, even in an era of high-tech sea mapping and navigation, the wisdom of seasoned mariners still can be no match for an angry sea. Schoenberger, 38, and Southward, 40, seemed dazed and relieved in an interview as they sifted the choices they'd made along the way, including the one no sailor wants to make: to declare Mayday, call for rescue and abandon ship.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case and The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2014
Five Maryland breweries won medals at the annual Great American Beer Festival in Denver over the weekend, including Gordon Biersch Brewery Restaurant in Annapolis, which won a gold medal in the "Smoke Beer" category for its Rauchbier. The festival was founded in 1982, and has grown each year, according to its official website. This year, 268 medals were awarded . The full list of Maryland winners: Gold • Category: Smoke Beer - Rauchbier (Gordon Biersch Brewery Restaurant - Annapolis)
SPORTS
By Jean Marbella and The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2014
No man is an island perhaps, but Ben Savage was quite a lonely speck of Tiger blue in the sea of Oriole orange at Camden Yards on Thursday. Savage was a long way from his hometown, but not so far from his adopted town of Ellicott City. He moved to the area in 2003 as an intelligence specialist for the Navy and brought his love for the Tigers. "There was lots of anxiety until Saturday," said Savage, 39. That's when his team finally clinched a postseason berth. "We didn't know if they were going to play so I waited to get tickets.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2014
Think back, way back, to a time when you wanted to communicate with someone you would like to get to know better. You look up his or her address in a thick book of thin, white pages (delivered once a year to your doorstep by the sole phone company). Having found the address, you pick up a piece of paper - stay with me now - and a pen. You write a greeting to the person who has caught your attention. You place said greeting in an envelope you seal and affix a stamp to, before placing in a mailbox down the street.
ENTERTAINMENT
Wesley Case and The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2014
The robust flavor of Heavy Seas Beer's Plank III -- the Belgian-style Trippel recently named "Best of Show: Best Overall Maryland Beer" by the Brewers Association of Maryland at the Comptroller's Cup competition -- comes from a pimento tree.  “It's the wood that they use in Jamaica to smoke or cook jerk chicken or jerk goat,” said brewmaster Christopher Leonard on Wednesday. “Nobody has made beer with this wood before, as far as we know.” It was a risk of Heavy Seas to use the foreign wood in its beer-aging process, but on Saturday at the Maryland Brewers' Harvest event in Fells Point, it paid off. Out of 192 entries from 23 state breweries, Plank III was named the top Maryland beer of the year.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | September 15, 2014
Baltimore and Annapolis are likely to suffer serious coastal flooding again before this century is over, and people and property in Ocean City and on the lower Eastern Shore face even greater risks as climate change accelerates sea level rise along Maryland's extensive shoreline, warns a new report. Drawing on new government data and projections, Climate Centra l, a nonprofit research and information group, calculates that 41,000 homes with 55,000 residents in the state are in danger under mid-range sea-level rise projections if storm-driven flooding surges five feet above the high tide line - which it did in the Baltimore area and elsewhere during Tropical Storm Isabel in 2003.
NEWS
By Kym Byrnes and For The Baltimore Sun | September 14, 2014
A sea of blue - the color designated to promote prostate cancer awareness - bobbed up and down around the Towson University campus Sunday morning as more than 2,000 people participated in the eighth-annual ZERO Prostate Cancer Run/Walk. One in six men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer and more than 33,000 men will die this year of the disease, according to Patricia Schnably, event organizer and vice president of marketing and communications at Chesapeake Urology. "Like a lot of cancers, if you don't catch it early, it spreads through the body and eventually will kill you," Schnably said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Anthony Day and Anthony Day,Los Angeles Times | December 28, 2003
Sea Dragons: Predators of the Prehistoric Oceans, by Richard Ellis. University Press of Kansas. 312 pages. $29.95. This is a wonderful, complicated grab bag of a book. Sea Dragons: Predators of the Prehistoric Oceans will appeal to paleontologists and to people who never saw a taxonomic puzzle they could resist. It may attract casual readers, who should feel free to dip in, as it were. Here and there, it also might entice the child or teen-ager who, by contemplating the book's murky wonders, may be drawn into the exhilarating exploration of the natural world.
NEWS
By GEOFFREY W. FIELDING | November 8, 1991
The death at sea of the British publishing magnate, Robert Maxwell, recalls an earlier occasion when printing ink and sea water proved an unhappy mix. Some 60 years ago a similar fate overtook the publisher of this newspaper. But first, Mr. Maxwell.His death was natural, authorities announced, and foul play is not suspected. Still, the precise cause of death has not been revealed, and other questions remain unanswered. Mr. Maxwell apparently had joined his 430-ton yacht, the Lady Ghislaine, named after one of his daughters, in Gibraltar on October 30. Five days later, on November 5, to be precise, the yacht, cruising off Tenerife, in the Canary Islands, reported that he was missing.
NEWS
August 29, 2014
Commentator Dan Ervin's recent discussion of the region's need for nuclear power argues that green alternatives such as wind and solar power can't adequately meet our energy needs ( "The nuclear option Aug. 26). He goes on to describe how green nuclear power is and how it won't contribute to global warming by contributing to carbon dioxide emissions. OK, I'll buy that. But isn't one of the most established facts about global warming the rise in sea levels we've already experience right here in the Chesapeake Bay?
TRAVEL
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 28, 2014
The Coast Guard rescued three people near Ocean City 's inlet Wednesday when their 17-foot boat capsized, and a Virginia teen drowned in a rip current there Tuesday as town officials limited beachgoers to wading as Hurricane Cristobal continues to churn up Mid-Atlantic waters. This summer has been the deadliest in years for swimmers at Maryland's oceanfront resort, with the first reported drownings while lifeguards were on duty since 2007, according to the Ocean City Beach Patrol.
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