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May 7, 1991
Alexander Calder's 14-foot-tall, red metal sculpture "100 Yard Dash" can now be seen in the Baltimore Museum of Art's Levi Sculpture garden, which has reopened to the public.The Calder stabile of 1969 is one of 30 sculptures given to the BMA by Ryda and Robert Levi, of which 14 are now in the garden including works by Joan Miro, Isamu Noguchi, Louise Nevelson and Ellsworth Kelly. The rest, including works by David Smith, Henry Moore and George Rickey, are expected to be moved from the Levis' Baltimore County estate by the end of 1994, though not all will be installed outside.
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TRAVEL
Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2010
– In the mid-1950's Washington architect and builder Francis Koenig was advised by his doctors to escape the city and find a place to rest from the tensions of his work, so he and his wife, Ann Marie, found a retreat among the tobacco farms of Calvert County. They built a waterfront home in Long Beach, took up sailing and grew to love the area and its watermen so deeply that in 1991 they donated 30 acres on St. John's Creek to the county and asked that it be used as a sculpture garden like those they had seen in their European travels.
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FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,SUN ARTS WRITER | August 3, 2005
Lauren Ross perched atop a 16-foot ladder yesterday, gently sponging off a giant heap of orange-red twisted steel. It was time for The 100 Yard Dash, the centerpiece in the Baltimore Museum of Art's outdoor sculpture garden, to have its annual bath. Twelve months of squirrels sharpening their little teeth on the base, of outdoor storms kicking up dirt and tree limbs, and of kids who tried to run up Alexander Calder's temptingly angled sculpture (though plenty of signs sternly order them not to)
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,ed.gunts@baltsun.com | November 27, 2008
Maryland-born artist Joseph Sheppard will soon have a permanent gallery in the state devoted to his paintings and sculptures. The University of Maryland University College has set Dec. 2 as the groundbreaking date for the Leroy Merritt Center for the Art of Joseph Sheppard, a $6 million, 5,500-square-foot gallery that is being added to the university's Inn and Conference Center in Adelphi. "This beautiful addition to our existing galleries will stand as an enduring tribute to Sheppard, a vibrant center for lifelong learning and a unique focal point for our acclaimed arts collection," said UMUC President Susan Aldridge.
TRAVEL
Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2010
– In the mid-1950's Washington architect and builder Francis Koenig was advised by his doctors to escape the city and find a place to rest from the tensions of his work, so he and his wife, Ann Marie, found a retreat among the tobacco farms of Calvert County. They built a waterfront home in Long Beach, took up sailing and grew to love the area and its watermen so deeply that in 1991 they donated 30 acres on St. John's Creek to the county and asked that it be used as a sculpture garden like those they had seen in their European travels.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,Sun Staff | May 27, 2001
If Rebecca Yenawine were queen for a day, she'd rid the world of racism, empower the children and hold art classes for all. For now, she is standing in a vacant lot in Reservoir Hill doing what she can. All around her, children are busy: A tall, thin boy in neon green dabs black paint on a metal sculpture. A girl with wire frame glasses and braids sweeps away shards of glass. A very little boy, his feet wrapped in plastic bags to protect his shoes, paints the sidewalk blue. These are the Kids on the Hill, members of an arts-based, after-school program founded and run by Yenawine.
NEWS
By Mark Hyman and Mark Hyman,SUN STAFF | July 8, 1996
PORTLAND, Ore. -- For nearly five decades, the only place to visit Henry Huggins, children's literature's most famous newspaper-delivery boy, was the shelf of a bookstore or a library.Now, there's an artful alternative.Fans of Henry can drop by the Beverly Cleary sculpture garden. In a city park, beside a row of well-worn tennis courts, they can poke Henry's arm, bark at his faithful dog, Ribsy, and wag a disapproving finger at their precocious pal, Ramona Quimby.The garden is a tribute to Cleary, a longtime Portland resident and one of the world's most beloved children's authors.
NEWS
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | February 17, 2008
It's been decades since French film critic Alfred Bazin first noted the peculiar power of photography to compel belief in the truthfulness of images - even if those "truths" exist only in our minds. The motion-picture camera, little more than 100 years old, introduced something completely new to the ancient art of image-making: a photographic likeness so compelling that it convinces us the flickering forms on the screen in a darkened room are as real as the person sitting next to us. Exhibit The Cinema Effect: Illusion, Reality and the Moving Image, through May 11. Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Independence Avenue and Seventh Street Southwest, Washington.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Meredith Cohn | August 14, 2008
Kosher with Salsa The lowdown: Kosher with Salsa, by Miryam Madrigal and directed by Jerry Gietka, is a romantic comedy about a Mexican Jewish convert and a Jewish girl from Beverly Hills, Calif. The show is the Baltimore Playwrights Festival's final presentation at the Fell's Point Corner Theatre. If you go : The show opens tonight and runs until Aug. 31 at the theater, 251 S. Ann St. Shows are at 8 p.m Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays and 7 p.m. Sundays. Tickets are $17. Call 410-276-7837 or go to fpct.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Annie Linskey | August 12, 2004
At the Improv David Alan Grier will ham it up at the Improv tomorrow through Sunday. You might recognize him from roles on Life with Bonnie, DAG or In Living Color or appearances on Crank Yankers. Shows will be 8 p.m. and 10 p.m. tomorrow; 7 p.m. and 9 p.m. on Saturday and Sunday. Tickets cost $25. Power Plant Live Plaza is at 6 M a rk e t P l a c e . C a l l 410-727-8500 or visit www. improv.com. RamblinM-F man at Recher If you need a little southern comfort, check out former Allman Brothers guitarist Dickey Betts when he plays tomorrow at the Recher Theater.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,ed.gunts@baltsun.com | November 16, 2008
Baltimoreans have so many public treasures that are on the verge of being lost that we don't always stop and marvel when a cultural resource is actually saved. That's the case with Pearlstone Park, a sculpture park near the Joseph Meyerhoff Symphony Hall that represents one of the most significant works of environmental art by an acclaimed New York sculptor, Scott Burton. For most of the past two decades, this park was so poorly maintained that visitors couldn't appreciate it, if they ever came to see it at all. This fall, with little fanfare, it has been restored to the point where visitors can once again see what the artist designed and use it the way he intended.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Meredith Cohn | August 14, 2008
Kosher with Salsa The lowdown: Kosher with Salsa, by Miryam Madrigal and directed by Jerry Gietka, is a romantic comedy about a Mexican Jewish convert and a Jewish girl from Beverly Hills, Calif. The show is the Baltimore Playwrights Festival's final presentation at the Fell's Point Corner Theatre. If you go : The show opens tonight and runs until Aug. 31 at the theater, 251 S. Ann St. Shows are at 8 p.m Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays and 7 p.m. Sundays. Tickets are $17. Call 410-276-7837 or go to fpct.
NEWS
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | February 17, 2008
It's been decades since French film critic Alfred Bazin first noted the peculiar power of photography to compel belief in the truthfulness of images - even if those "truths" exist only in our minds. The motion-picture camera, little more than 100 years old, introduced something completely new to the ancient art of image-making: a photographic likeness so compelling that it convinces us the flickering forms on the screen in a darkened room are as real as the person sitting next to us. Exhibit The Cinema Effect: Illusion, Reality and the Moving Image, through May 11. Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Independence Avenue and Seventh Street Southwest, Washington.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun art critic | October 4, 2007
The paintings of the Washington Color School artist Morris Louis are as impossible to describe in words as an aria by Puccini, and as inexplicably lovely. Even after we've learned to experience them with open hearts, an irreducible kernel of mystery remains. During the last five years of his life, tragically cut short at age 49 by cancer in 1962, Louis created more than 600 works by pouring and dripping thin washes of acrylic paint on heroically scaled rectangles of unprimed canvas. The procedure gave his wholly abstract images the luminous transparency of watercolor drawings.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Reporter | February 11, 2007
YOU KNOW A GREAT LOVE letter when you get one. It's the one that still makes you feel weak in the knees when you read it for the hundredth time. Recognizing a great love letter isn't hard. Writing one is, because it doesn't have anything to do with the right paper or the proper grammar or complete sentences. David Lowenherz, who edited The 50 Greatest Love Letters of All Time, says he doesn't have a clue what stationery the love letters in his book were written on. "It's the phrasing that matters, the deep sense of caring, the belief in the other person."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 2006
MUSIC JAZZ AND SCULPTURE If you like your jazz with a little ambience, you'll want to attend one (or more) of the "Jazz in the Sculpture Garden" concerts on select Saturdays through August at the Baltimore Museum of Art. The outdoor music series kicks off this week with the Winard Harper Sextet. Harper is a Baltimore-born drummer. Coming up on July 15 will be the Rumba Club. On July 29, the Stryker / Slagle Band performs. Then on Aug. 12, it's the Don Braden Organic Trio featuring Vanessa Rubin.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,ed.gunts@baltsun.com | November 27, 2008
Maryland-born artist Joseph Sheppard will soon have a permanent gallery in the state devoted to his paintings and sculptures. The University of Maryland University College has set Dec. 2 as the groundbreaking date for the Leroy Merritt Center for the Art of Joseph Sheppard, a $6 million, 5,500-square-foot gallery that is being added to the university's Inn and Conference Center in Adelphi. "This beautiful addition to our existing galleries will stand as an enduring tribute to Sheppard, a vibrant center for lifelong learning and a unique focal point for our acclaimed arts collection," said UMUC President Susan Aldridge.
NEWS
By Cyril T. Zaneski and Cyril T. Zaneski,SUN STAFF | November 11, 2003
A stone menagerie on the Johns Hopkins University Homewood campus, damaged by hammer-swinging vandals more than a decade ago, has been restored to its quirky glory. Almost. A noted New York art conservator recently replaced pointy ears, patched smashed snouts and restored cracked heads on some of the 10 fanciful cast-granite and marble animal sculptures that were battered a few years after their 1983 dedication in a wooded garden near Hopkins' stadium. Only one critter resisted restoration: a black granite penguin, which remains headless.
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,SUN ARTS WRITER | August 3, 2005
Lauren Ross perched atop a 16-foot ladder yesterday, gently sponging off a giant heap of orange-red twisted steel. It was time for The 100 Yard Dash, the centerpiece in the Baltimore Museum of Art's outdoor sculpture garden, to have its annual bath. Twelve months of squirrels sharpening their little teeth on the base, of outdoor storms kicking up dirt and tree limbs, and of kids who tried to run up Alexander Calder's temptingly angled sculpture (though plenty of signs sternly order them not to)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Annie Linskey | August 12, 2004
At the Improv David Alan Grier will ham it up at the Improv tomorrow through Sunday. You might recognize him from roles on Life with Bonnie, DAG or In Living Color or appearances on Crank Yankers. Shows will be 8 p.m. and 10 p.m. tomorrow; 7 p.m. and 9 p.m. on Saturday and Sunday. Tickets cost $25. Power Plant Live Plaza is at 6 M a rk e t P l a c e . C a l l 410-727-8500 or visit www. improv.com. RamblinM-F man at Recher If you need a little southern comfort, check out former Allman Brothers guitarist Dickey Betts when he plays tomorrow at the Recher Theater.
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