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By Rory O'Connor and Rory O'Connor,Knight-Ridder News Service | June 15, 1992
San Jose, Calif. -- In 1983, in a story now firmly embedded in the folklore of Silicon Valley, Apple Computer's intense young boss, Steve Jobs, persuaded an unassuming, middle-aged soft drink executive from New York City to become chief executive of the young company by issuing a challenge: "Do you want to spend the rest of your life selling sugared water, or do you want a chance to change the world?"Now, nine years after leaving Pepsi-Cola and seven years after ousting Mr. Jobs from the company he co-founded, Apple's chairman and chief executive officer, John Sculley, stands poised to meet that challenge.
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BUSINESS
December 30, 1994
Spectrum ousts its boardSpectrum Information Technologies Inc. replaced its entire board of directors and named Donald S. Amoruso as chief executive yesterday.Mr. Amoruso, 57, is the founder and principal consultant of DMA Associates of Westchester County, N.Y.Ten Spectrum directors already have resigned this year, most notably former Apple Computer Inc. Chairman John Sculley, who resigned as Spectrum's chairman in February.@
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BUSINESS
December 30, 1994
Spectrum ousts its boardSpectrum Information Technologies Inc. replaced its entire board of directors and named Donald S. Amoruso as chief executive yesterday.Mr. Amoruso, 57, is the founder and principal consultant of DMA Associates of Westchester County, N.Y.Ten Spectrum directors already have resigned this year, most notably former Apple Computer Inc. Chairman John Sculley, who resigned as Spectrum's chairman in February.@
BUSINESS
March 11, 1994
Intel loses copyright fightIn a verdict potentially worth billions of dollars, a federal court jury in San Jose, Calif., ruled yesterday for Advanced Micro Devices Inc. in its long-running litigation with Intel Corp.The jury found that a 1976 copyright agreement between Advanced Micro Devices and Intel granted Advanced Micro rights to sell microchips containing Intel microcode, which is software embedded in the chip. Intel said it would appeal.Shares in Advanced Micro Devices soared on the news, closing at $28.875, up $6.125, on the New York Stock Exchange.
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Staff Writer | April 7, 1992
Allied Research Corp., a Baltimore-based defense contractor, bTC has named former Grumman official Jay R. Sculley president and chief operating officer.Mr. Sculley takes over positions held by Reginald W. Carter, who was promoted to chairman of the board. Mr. Carter remains chief executive officer. The previous chairman, Marvin B. Ruffin, died Nov. 16, 1990. Both appointments were effective yesterday.Allied, which once had manufacturing operations in the Baltimore area, has only five employees here now. Its main plant, with 391 employees, is near Brussels, Belgium, and produces ammunition and rifle grenades, said Richard Farrell, a company spokesman.
BUSINESS
March 11, 1994
Intel loses copyright fightIn a verdict potentially worth billions of dollars, a federal court jury in San Jose, Calif., ruled yesterday for Advanced Micro Devices Inc. in its long-running litigation with Intel Corp.The jury found that a 1976 copyright agreement between Advanced Micro Devices and Intel granted Advanced Micro rights to sell microchips containing Intel microcode, which is software embedded in the chip. Intel said it would appeal.Shares in Advanced Micro Devices soared on the news, closing at $28.875, up $6.125, on the New York Stock Exchange.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,Staff Writer | January 29, 1993
Allied Research Corp., a Baltimore-based company that has built much of the ammunition and artillery shells stored in bunkers around the world, said yesterday that it had created a division to help dispose of the military waste.The new subsidiary, ARC Services Inc., will also be involved in the cleanup of industrial waste.The business of munitions dismantling and environmental cleanup could be worth billions of dollars and represents a natural extension of Allied's munitions production, said Jay R. Sculley, president and chief executive of Allied Research.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,Staff Writer | June 4, 1993
Shareholders of Allied Research Corp. were left in suspense yesterday when the company disclosed that its board is considering a buyout proposal higher than the $16.50 a share offer it received in mid-April.Jay R. Sculley, chairman and chief executive of the munitions maker, told shareholders at its annual meeting here that the board had received a bid higher than the previously announced $75 million acquisition proposal from Florida businessman Malcolm L. Glazer.Although he declined to identify the source of the higher bid, Mr. Sculley hinted that Mr. Glazer had upped the ante.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,Staff Writer | December 21, 1992
It's Jay R. Sculley's time to fight off the wolves.Three years ago, when Allied Research Corp.'s board appointed as chief executive Reinald W. Carter, an accountant with experience punching cows on a ranch in Australia, they laughed and said: "Throw him to the wolves and hold him responsible."It was not a fair fight. Since early 1990, Mr. Carter has completely transformed the Baltimore-based defense contractor, taking it from annual losses and sales of about $45 million to a thriving business with sales in excess of $200 million and record earnings, which are expected to top $14 million this year.
BUSINESS
February 9, 1994
Layoffs at U.S. firms hit highMajor corporations announced 108,000 layoffs in January, the highest monthly level in the four years since the figures have been tracked, a consulting firm said yesterday.Challenger, Gray & Christmas Inc., based in Chicago, said the level of announced layoffs topped even the worst of the 1990 recession.Communications companies GTE Corp., NYNEX Corp. and Pacific Telesis Group cut a total of almost 44,000 workers.Spectrum to sue Sculley todaySpectrum Information Technologies Inc., the wireless data company stunned Monday by the resignation of John Sculley as chairman and chief executive officer, said yesterday that it planned to file a federal lawsuit against Mr. Sculley, claiming damages of more than $300 million.
BUSINESS
February 9, 1994
Layoffs at U.S. firms hit highMajor corporations announced 108,000 layoffs in January, the highest monthly level in the four years since the figures have been tracked, a consulting firm said yesterday.Challenger, Gray & Christmas Inc., based in Chicago, said the level of announced layoffs topped even the worst of the 1990 recession.Communications companies GTE Corp., NYNEX Corp. and Pacific Telesis Group cut a total of almost 44,000 workers.Spectrum to sue Sculley todaySpectrum Information Technologies Inc., the wireless data company stunned Monday by the resignation of John Sculley as chairman and chief executive officer, said yesterday that it planned to file a federal lawsuit against Mr. Sculley, claiming damages of more than $300 million.
BUSINESS
By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,New York Bureau of The Sun | February 8, 1994
NEW YORK -- In one of the stranger chapters in recent corporate history, John Sculley, the former marketing whiz behind Apple computers, quit his job as head of an obscure telecommunications company yesterday, saying that its president had hired him only to profit off his name.Mr. Sculley, who left Apple Computer Inc. last year after it suffered a series of business setbacks, said in a statement that he would not have joined Spectrum Information Technologies Inc. in October if the company been more upfront with him.He said he was not told that the Securities and Exchange Commission was investigating the company's accounting practices.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service The Los Angeles Times contributed to this article | June 19, 1993
SAN FRANCISCO -- John Sculley, the chairman of Apple Computer Inc., said yesterday that he would relinquish his role as chief executive to pursue alliances involving new computer-based technologies.Mr. Sculley, 54, who came to Apple 10 years ago from PepsiCo Inc., will retain the title of chairman and hand over the chief executive's job to Apple's president, Michael Spindler.In an interview, Mr. Sculley said he would direct most of his energy to creating new markets for the personal computer maker, in concert with communications, publishing and entertainment companies.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,Staff Writer | June 4, 1993
Shareholders of Allied Research Corp. were left in suspense yesterday when the company disclosed that its board is considering a buyout proposal higher than the $16.50 a share offer it received in mid-April.Jay R. Sculley, chairman and chief executive of the munitions maker, told shareholders at its annual meeting here that the board had received a bid higher than the previously announced $75 million acquisition proposal from Florida businessman Malcolm L. Glazer.Although he declined to identify the source of the higher bid, Mr. Sculley hinted that Mr. Glazer had upped the ante.
NEWS
February 23, 1993
President Clinton has cashed in rather quickly on the seating arrangements for his economic-policy address to Congress last week. Remember the tableau in the distinguished visitors gallery? There was First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton, flanked on her right by John Sculley, chairman and CEO of Apple Computer, and on her left by Alan Greenspan, chairman of the Federal Reserve Board.Two days later, Mr. Greenspan appeared before the Senate Banking Committee to describe the Clinton program as a "serious" and "credible" and "detailed" attempt to shrink the deficit.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,Staff Writer | January 29, 1993
Allied Research Corp., a Baltimore-based company that has built much of the ammunition and artillery shells stored in bunkers around the world, said yesterday that it had created a division to help dispose of the military waste.The new subsidiary, ARC Services Inc., will also be involved in the cleanup of industrial waste.The business of munitions dismantling and environmental cleanup could be worth billions of dollars and represents a natural extension of Allied's munitions production, said Jay R. Sculley, president and chief executive of Allied Research.
BUSINESS
December 3, 1992
Reinald W. Carter, who guided Baltimore-based Allied Research Corp. through a period of rapid growth and a return to profitability, will retire at the end of this year as chairman and chief executive.Mr. Carter will be succeeded as chief executive by Jay R. Sculley, who has been president and chief operating officer since May, the company said this week. He has been a director since early 1991. The chairman's position will remain vacant, at least temporarily, the firm said.Dr. Sculley is a graduate of Virginia Military Institute and has a doctorate in engineering from the Johns Hopkins University.
NEWS
February 23, 1993
President Clinton has cashed in rather quickly on the seating arrangements for his economic-policy address to Congress last week. Remember the tableau in the distinguished visitors gallery? There was First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton, flanked on her right by John Sculley, chairman and CEO of Apple Computer, and on her left by Alan Greenspan, chairman of the Federal Reserve Board.Two days later, Mr. Greenspan appeared before the Senate Banking Committee to describe the Clinton program as a "serious" and "credible" and "detailed" attempt to shrink the deficit.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,Staff Writer | December 21, 1992
It's Jay R. Sculley's time to fight off the wolves.Three years ago, when Allied Research Corp.'s board appointed as chief executive Reinald W. Carter, an accountant with experience punching cows on a ranch in Australia, they laughed and said: "Throw him to the wolves and hold him responsible."It was not a fair fight. Since early 1990, Mr. Carter has completely transformed the Baltimore-based defense contractor, taking it from annual losses and sales of about $45 million to a thriving business with sales in excess of $200 million and record earnings, which are expected to top $14 million this year.
BUSINESS
December 3, 1992
Reinald W. Carter, who guided Baltimore-based Allied Research Corp. through a period of rapid growth and a return to profitability, will retire at the end of this year as chairman and chief executive.Mr. Carter will be succeeded as chief executive by Jay R. Sculley, who has been president and chief operating officer since May, the company said this week. He has been a director since early 1991. The chairman's position will remain vacant, at least temporarily, the firm said.Dr. Sculley is a graduate of Virginia Military Institute and has a doctorate in engineering from the Johns Hopkins University.
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