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Scuba Diving

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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | October 15, 2011
Outfitted in scuba gear and 100 feet underwater, Cody Unser noticed a weird tingling in her legs. She dived a second and a third time, and again felt tingling. It was subtle, but it was the first new sensation that she had felt in three years, since becoming paralyzed from the chest down at age 12. "I couldn't believe I had gotten some feeling back," said Unser, daughter of Indianapolis 500 champ Al Unser Jr., now 24 and leading a foundation focusing on paralysis research and quality-of-life issues called The Cody Unser First Step Foundation.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Jordan Bartel | December 30, 2013
One of the best parts of New Year's Eve (other than preparing for a fresh start) is the parties. You must go. To maybe a few. And you must be prepared for what you'll encounter. Or, more specifically, who you'll encounter. It's not an exact science, but we've determined in our years of New Year's Eve party anthropological analyses that there are seven distinct species native to the New Year's Eve party. Proceed with caution. The over-anxious, fireworks-obsessed host How to spot them: He/she is the one dressed very nicely, hovering over hors d'oeuvres, looking at the clock frantically as though there's some way (some way!
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NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,Sun reporter | January 1, 2008
A Harford County woman died Sunday while scuba diving with her husband and two children in Key Largo, Fla., according to her family and Florida authorities. Nancy A. Kreiter, a College of Notre Dame of Maryland professor who specialized in the study of spiders that live near ponds, had long yearned to explore underwater ecosystems, and the trip to Florida was the culmination of that wish, said her daughter, Kara Clissold. "She grew up on the Mississippi River and she wanted to learn how to scuba dive," said Clissold.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | October 15, 2011
Outfitted in scuba gear and 100 feet underwater, Cody Unser noticed a weird tingling in her legs. She dived a second and a third time, and again felt tingling. It was subtle, but it was the first new sensation that she had felt in three years, since becoming paralyzed from the chest down at age 12. "I couldn't believe I had gotten some feeling back," said Unser, daughter of Indianapolis 500 champ Al Unser Jr., now 24 and leading a foundation focusing on paralysis research and quality-of-life issues called The Cody Unser First Step Foundation.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,Staff Writer Staff writer Peter Hermann contributed to this story | November 21, 1993
The difference made by a sensational murder case nearly 10 years ago ago can be seen in two photographs of children swimming among coral reefs that hang on a wall of the Northern District Police Station in Linthicum.Another difference shows in a lawyer who has decided that it's silly to scream at his children over a messy room, and another in a woman who, her own children grown, devotes her time to teaching troubled young people how to cope and express themselves.In the decade since mild-mannered Larry Swartz, 17, killed his parents in a blood bath at the family's Cape St. Claire home on the night of Jan. 16, 1984, those close to the youth say the lessons they learned from his story changed their lives.
NEWS
June 28, 1996
B. J. "Buck" Wynne,40, former Texas water commissioner and federal Environmental Protection Agency administrator, died Wednesday of a heart attack while scuba diving off the coast of Belize.State leaders lauded Mr. Wynne, who was chairman of the Water Commission from 1988 to 1991, as a man deeply committed to public service and a steward for the environment. He also served under President George Bush as an EPA administrator.James Alfred Field Jr.,80, a former history professor at Swarthmore College and author on U.S. naval history and foreign relations, died Monday at his home in Newton Square, Pa. The cause was complications from a stroke, his family said.
NEWS
By Karlayne R. Parker and Karlayne R. Parker,UniSun Editor | June 3, 2007
Several years ago, I was fascinated by Michael Cottman's presentation at the Reginald F. Lewis Museum of Maryland African American History and Culture about diving to see the wreck of the Henrietta Marie, a sunken slave ship off the coast of Florida. Cottman's discussion, timed with an exhibit at the museum, made me proud to see someone who looked like me talking about scuba diving and seeing the the ocean's underworld. It was after Cottman's talk that I got the idea that there must be other African-Americans who have an adventuresome spirit.
NEWS
January 1, 2003
George William Enders IV, a former Baltimore police officer and retired 30-year agent for the Maryland Division of Parole and Probation, died Sunday of cancer at Dorchester General Hospital on the Eastern Shore. The Cambridge resident was 59. Born in Giles County, Va., he grew up in Hamilton and was a 1961 graduate of City College. After graduation, he enlisted in the Marines and served in the Vietnam War. In 1991, he served in the Persian Gulf war and was discharged with the rank of colonel.
TRAVEL
April 26, 2009
I live in Baltimore and in January I went scuba diving in Curacao, where I spotted - no pun intended - this spotted moray eel at about 50 feet underwater. Luckily, I had my camera with underwater housing available. Curacao is a wonderful island with great weather, friendly people, good food, and terrific diving and snorkeling. The beautiful reefs are so close to shore that in most places you can dive right off the beach and swim to the drop-off, without having to take a boat. The Baltimore Sun welcomes submissions for "My Best Shot."
NEWS
By Ruma Kumar and Ruma Kumar,Sun reporter | May 28, 2007
Gary Charles Wheatley, a builder and remodeler who enjoyed restoring historic homes, died of a heart attack May 21 while scuba diving off the Florida Keys with two friends. He was 49. Born in Baltimore, Mr. Wheatley grew up in Towson. He graduated in 1976 from Loch Raven Senior High School, where he met Kathy Lynn DiMartino. She was a quiet, bookish girl. He was handsome, with dark hair and a penchant for filling silence with quick jokes. They fell in love at 17, married four years later and eventually settled in Monkton.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2011
Joseph Emmett Queen Jr., who spent three decades as a systems engineer for Westinghouse and its successor company, Northrop Grumman, died of unknown causes Sept. 12 at his home in Riva. He was 57. A Baltimore native, Mr. Queen grew up in and around the Guilford and Roland Park neighborhoods. He attended the Cathedral School, Loyola High School and Loyola College (now Loyola University Maryland). He received his master's degree in computer science from the Johns Hopkins University in 1983.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2010
As college freshmen head off to the dorms for the first time and make the transition from Mom's kitchen to campus dining halls, weight gain is common. It's often called the "freshman 15. " But putting on 15 pounds doesn't have to happen, according to Rebecca Myrowitz, a nutritionist with the Greater Baltimore Medical Center's Comprehensive Obesity Management Program. Question: What is the "freshman 15" and what are the most common causes? Answer: The "freshman 15" is when college freshman are away from home for the first time and may gain an average of 15 pounds over the year.
TRAVEL
April 26, 2009
I live in Baltimore and in January I went scuba diving in Curacao, where I spotted - no pun intended - this spotted moray eel at about 50 feet underwater. Luckily, I had my camera with underwater housing available. Curacao is a wonderful island with great weather, friendly people, good food, and terrific diving and snorkeling. The beautiful reefs are so close to shore that in most places you can dive right off the beach and swim to the drop-off, without having to take a boat. The Baltimore Sun welcomes submissions for "My Best Shot."
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,Sun reporter | January 1, 2008
A Harford County woman died Sunday while scuba diving with her husband and two children in Key Largo, Fla., according to her family and Florida authorities. Nancy A. Kreiter, a College of Notre Dame of Maryland professor who specialized in the study of spiders that live near ponds, had long yearned to explore underwater ecosystems, and the trip to Florida was the culmination of that wish, said her daughter, Kara Clissold. "She grew up on the Mississippi River and she wanted to learn how to scuba dive," said Clissold.
NEWS
By Karlayne R. Parker and Karlayne R. Parker,UniSun Editor | June 3, 2007
Several years ago, I was fascinated by Michael Cottman's presentation at the Reginald F. Lewis Museum of Maryland African American History and Culture about diving to see the wreck of the Henrietta Marie, a sunken slave ship off the coast of Florida. Cottman's discussion, timed with an exhibit at the museum, made me proud to see someone who looked like me talking about scuba diving and seeing the the ocean's underworld. It was after Cottman's talk that I got the idea that there must be other African-Americans who have an adventuresome spirit.
NEWS
By Stephen G. Henderson and Stephen G. Henderson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 3, 2007
Marcus Asante is ready to set sail. When the wind is at his back, he plans to pilot his boat Soukous (named for a jazzy type of African dance music that's similar to a rumba) out of the Inner Harbor and into open waters. Founder of the 40-member Universal Sailing Club of Baltimore, Asante is one of an increasing number of African-Americans taking up sports such as sailing, hiking, biking and scuba diving. Groups such as the Universal Sailing Club are making a big impact, according to Charles K. West, publisher of Black Outdoorsman magazine.
NEWS
By Adam Sachs and Adam Sachs,Sun Staff Writer | July 21, 1994
Edward E. Suarez Jr.'s scuba diving buddies called him "The Dive Monster" because his gusto for underwater exploration seemed insatiable."When there was water around, he'd be in the water," said Harvey Storck, a diving partner from Potomac. "Even after a day of diving when we'd all be exhausted, he'd be ready to go again."Mr. Suarez, 48, of Columbia, died pursuing his passion Sunday in an accident during a cave dive in Bakerton, W.Va., near Harpers Ferry.Dr. James Frost, West Virginia's deputy chief medical examiner, said yesterday that Mr. Suarez apparently developed the bends, an acute condition in which nitrogen bubbles form in the vascular system.
NEWS
By Ruma Kumar and Ruma Kumar,Sun reporter | May 28, 2007
Gary Charles Wheatley, a builder and remodeler who enjoyed restoring historic homes, died of a heart attack May 21 while scuba diving off the Florida Keys with two friends. He was 49. Born in Baltimore, Mr. Wheatley grew up in Towson. He graduated in 1976 from Loch Raven Senior High School, where he met Kathy Lynn DiMartino. She was a quiet, bookish girl. He was handsome, with dark hair and a penchant for filling silence with quick jokes. They fell in love at 17, married four years later and eventually settled in Monkton.
NEWS
By CAL RIPKEN | January 1, 2006
I'm a scuba diver. My oldest daughter learned to dive a few years ago and we've had some great times diving in Florida and the Bahamas. Now, I would like my younger daughter to learn to dive. The university she attends has regular scuba classes, but she is hesitant to take one. How can I persuade her to learn to dive so that both of my daughters can join me in exploring the wonders of the underwater world? - Ellsworth Boyd, White Hall DEAR ELLSWORTH -- I would spend some time to get a firm understanding as to why she doesn't want to learn how to scuba dive.
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