Advertisement
HomeCollectionsScrubbers
IN THE NEWS

Scrubbers

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By Tim Wheeler | December 22, 2011
The new Environmental Protection Agency rule requiring coal-fired power plants to reduce their emissions of mercury and other toxic air pollutants is generating a lot of debate, with environmental and health groups hailing it while industry groups contend it will hurt the economy. Here in Maryland, though, it seems tighter regulation is universally welcomed. That's because 70 percent of the mercury that's deposited in state lakes and rivers blows in from out of Maryland, according to the state Department of the Environment . The state has issued warnings against eating a number of fish from Maryland waters because they've absorbed mercury, which can harm the nervous system.
ARTICLES BY DATE
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | April 29, 2012
In their quest to cure Baltimore's ailing harbor, advocates and authorities have tried one gadget after another: floating wetlands, a solar-powered aerator, even a trash wheel. Add now the "algal turf scrubber," a long wooden sluiceway in which harbor water is pumped over a bed of slimy green algae. The ecological restoration firm Biohabitats and the Living Classrooms Foundation invited news media to see the contraption set up on a former chromium plant site in Fells Point. The gutter, 350 feet long by one foot wide, uses native algae to strip nutrients, suspended sediment and carbon from water and inject oxygen into it before returning it to the harbor.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Evening Sun Staff | January 13, 1992
Worried about the high cost of new pollution controls for the city's South Baltimore waste-to-energy plant, Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke has asked federal environmental officials to show "flexibility" in applying their rules to the cash-strapped city.Schmoke met with Environmental Protection Agency Administrator William K. Reilly in Washington last week to outline his concerns over proposed EPA incinerator regulations.The mayor said he asked the EPA chief to consider the cost-effectiveness of requiring all-new emission controls for relatively modern incinerators like the Baltimore Refuse Energy Systems Co. burner on Russell Street.
FEATURES
By Tim Wheeler | December 22, 2011
The new Environmental Protection Agency rule requiring coal-fired power plants to reduce their emissions of mercury and other toxic air pollutants is generating a lot of debate, with environmental and health groups hailing it while industry groups contend it will hurt the economy. Here in Maryland, though, it seems tighter regulation is universally welcomed. That's because 70 percent of the mercury that's deposited in state lakes and rivers blows in from out of Maryland, according to the state Department of the Environment . The state has issued warnings against eating a number of fish from Maryland waters because they've absorbed mercury, which can harm the nervous system.
NEWS
By From Staff Reports | September 27, 1994
The average Potomac Edison customer will see a $3.71 rate increase on the November utility bill, rather than the $8.63 requested in April, company officials said yesterday.Potomac Edison, which serves about 9,400 customers in Carroll County, has said a residential customer who uses 1,000 kilowatts of energy a month will now pay $74.46 each month rather than $70.75.Company officials won the increase -- the fifth requested this year -- by arguing that it was necessary to help pay for a scrubber system on its coal-burning power stations in West Virginia.
NEWS
By Staff Report | December 9, 1992
HAGERSTOWN -- The Maryland Public Service Commission has approved a request from Potomac Edison Co. to increase an anti-pollution surcharge on customers' bills by $2.2 million.The higher rate applies to electric service provided on and after Dec. 3. Residential customers will see bills rise about 46 cents a month, the utility said.The surcharge reflects the cost of complying with the Clean Air Act of 1990, specifically financing construction of equipment intended to reduce by 90 percent the sulfur dioxide emissions from the company's Harrison power station near Shinnston, W.Va.
BUSINESS
By Kim Clark and Kim Clark,Sun Staff Writer | September 12, 1995
Environmental Elements Corp., which has seen its profits go up in smoke along with the demand for its air pollution control devices, announced another restructuring yesterday.The Baltimore-based maker of smokestack "scrubbers" said it will close its Jeffersonville, Ind., facility and lay off most of the 50 workers there.At least 10 of the Indiana workers will be offered jobs in Baltimore, the company said.In addition, the company shuffled its executives. Chairman Richard Hug, who led the company when it broke away from Koppers Co. in 1983, and when it went public in 1990, was moved to chairman emeritus.
NEWS
December 29, 2003
MARYLAND AND 10 of its Northeast neighbors are beginning 2004 with an important victory in their drive to stop the Bush administration from blowing new holes in the Clean Air Act. A three-judge federal appeals panel issued an injunction last week blocking the weakened rules proposed by Mr. Bush from taking effect until a hearing on the issue can be conducted. The injunction is a signal that the court believes there is at least a reasonable prospect that the Bush rules will be struck down permanently.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | April 29, 2012
In their quest to cure Baltimore's ailing harbor, advocates and authorities have tried one gadget after another: floating wetlands, a solar-powered aerator, even a trash wheel. Add now the "algal turf scrubber," a long wooden sluiceway in which harbor water is pumped over a bed of slimy green algae. The ecological restoration firm Biohabitats and the Living Classrooms Foundation invited news media to see the contraption set up on a former chromium plant site in Fells Point. The gutter, 350 feet long by one foot wide, uses native algae to strip nutrients, suspended sediment and carbon from water and inject oxygen into it before returning it to the harbor.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler | February 20, 2010
A new smokestack is not usually cause for celebration among environmentalists. But the 400-foot stack spouting white clouds at Brandon Shores power plant represents a quantum leap in cleaning Baltimore's air, not another source of pollution. Constellation Energy has just completed work on $875 million worth of pollution "scrubbers" at its 26-year-old coal-fired power plant on the Patapsco River. One of the plant's two steam-generating units resumed operation with the new air-quality controls in December, and the second is cranking up now. The white clouds rising from the stack are almost entirely water vapor.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2010
Soft and stringy, a mat of green clings to the bottom of the long metal trough as warm water courses down it to the Susquehanna River. "There it is — green gold!" says Patrick C. Kangas, as he scoops up a clump of blue-green algae growing in the sluiceway he's set up at the Peach Bottom nuclear power plant, just across the Maryland line. Kangas, a University of Maryland ecological engineer, sees a bright green future in such lowly pond scum — a solution to the Chesapeake Bay's water-quality woes, and possibly even a clean, renewable energy source to boot.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler | February 20, 2010
A new smokestack is not usually cause for celebration among environmentalists. But the 400-foot stack spouting white clouds at Brandon Shores power plant represents a quantum leap in cleaning Baltimore's air, not another source of pollution. Constellation Energy has just completed work on $875 million worth of pollution "scrubbers" at its 26-year-old coal-fired power plant on the Patapsco River. One of the plant's two steam-generating units resumed operation with the new air-quality controls in December, and the second is cranking up now. The white clouds rising from the stack are almost entirely water vapor.
BUSINESS
By The Denver Post | August 30, 2007
Even if you have firewalls and up-to-date anti-virus and anti-spyware programs installed on a PC, there are other ways for your personal information to make it into the wrong hands. "Applications leave traces of information behind. That information can be telling of certain things," said Mike Irwin, chief operating officer for Webroot Software Inc. in Boulder, Colo. "For people that know where to look, it provides a distinct visibility into specific aspects of computer usage by the user."
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,sun reporter | June 6, 2007
Giffen B. "Giff" Nickol Sr., a retired chemical engineer who worked with the Navy's nuclear submarine fleet, died Thursday at Greater Baltimore Medical Center of injuries he suffered in a fall last month. The Idlewylde resident was 83. Born in Baltimore and raised on Christopher Avenue in Hamilton, he helped support his family after his father contracted tuberculosis. He caddied at Clifton Park golf course, set duckpins in a bowling alley and drove an ice truck even though he had no driver's license, said his son, Giffen B. Nickol Jr. of Bel Air. Mr. Nickol was a 1942 Polytechnic Institute graduate and worked at Revere Copper and Brass in Southwest Baltimore while serving as a civilian volunteer in a Coast Guard auxiliary unit during World War II. In 1947, he worked as a chemist and did engineering work at the Navy Marine Engineering Laboratory, later called the David Taylor Naval Ship Research and Development Center in Annapolis.
NEWS
December 29, 2003
MARYLAND AND 10 of its Northeast neighbors are beginning 2004 with an important victory in their drive to stop the Bush administration from blowing new holes in the Clean Air Act. A three-judge federal appeals panel issued an injunction last week blocking the weakened rules proposed by Mr. Bush from taking effect until a hearing on the issue can be conducted. The injunction is a signal that the court believes there is at least a reasonable prospect that the Bush rules will be struck down permanently.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | November 15, 2002
Humans, young and old, are not the only species that get bored with their toys. So do animals - and veterinary experts say that is unhealthy. This week, about 25 staffers at the National Aquarium took up power drills, handsaws, PVC pipes and an assortment of hardware to build new toys. Staffers strung together a rope ladder for South American monkeys, chained together Hula-Hoops for bottlenose dolphins and hacked PVC pipes into shapes that will challenge the eight arms of the giant Pacific octopus.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2010
Soft and stringy, a mat of green clings to the bottom of the long metal trough as warm water courses down it to the Susquehanna River. "There it is — green gold!" says Patrick C. Kangas, as he scoops up a clump of blue-green algae growing in the sluiceway he's set up at the Peach Bottom nuclear power plant, just across the Maryland line. Kangas, a University of Maryland ecological engineer, sees a bright green future in such lowly pond scum — a solution to the Chesapeake Bay's water-quality woes, and possibly even a clean, renewable energy source to boot.
BUSINESS
By Kristine Henry and Kristine Henry,SUN STAFF | August 4, 1999
A tentative ruling by a Texas environmental commission would force Crown Central Petroleum Corp. to install a $300,000 device to help stop sulfur emissions at one of its refineries in Texas -- an order readily accepted by the company but deemed insufficient by environmental groups and health officials who say Crown should install a more effective unit that would cost more than $20 million.The move comes nearly a year after the Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission fined Crown just over $1 million -- the largest air pollution fine ever issued by Texas -- for continued violations between 1993 and 1998 that included excessive hydrogen sulfide and sulfur dioxide emissions at its Pasadena refinery.
BUSINESS
By Kristine Henry and Kristine Henry,SUN STAFF | August 4, 1999
A tentative ruling by a Texas environmental commission would force Crown Central Petroleum Corp. to install a $300,000 device to help stop sulfur emissions at one of its refineries in Texas -- an order readily accepted by the company but deemed insufficient by environmental groups and health officials who say Crown should install a more effective unit that would cost more than $20 million.The move comes nearly a year after the Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission fined Crown just over $1 million -- the largest air pollution fine ever issued by Texas -- for continued violations between 1993 and 1998 that included excessive hydrogen sulfide and sulfur dioxide emissions at its Pasadena refinery.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | June 2, 1997
They scrub at sunrise, before thousands of tourists arrive.They scrub as a tribute, cleaning dirt away from the 58,000 chiseled names and polishing the black granite surface of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial.They scrub because if war claimed their lives, these volunteers would want someone to care for their memory, too.For seven years, on the first Sunday of each month, the men and women of the 89th Maintenance Squadron have come to the wall in Washington from Andrews Air Force Base in Prince George's County to help protect one of the nation's most famous landmarks.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.