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By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | September 30, 1999
For Tracey Hough, and legions of other nurses, a scrub is no longer just a scrub; it's a bright fashion statement that elevates spirits all the way around.Hough, a 29-year-old licensed practical nurse who has spent her career working with the elderly, started out in traditional white and has worked her way to a bold lime green in the nursing color spectrum. Over the years, one administrator led to another, and one permissible color led to another. The "feeling was the brighter, the cheerier the uniforms are, the better the patients are," says Hough, who lives in North Baltimore and works at the Liberty Adult Daycare center.
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NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | June 30, 2014
One-fourth of the names on Maryland's sex offender registry could be removed after the state's top court expanded Monday on an earlier ruling that adding offenders from before the list was created violated the state constitution. The Court of Appeals declared last year that the state could not require the registration of people who committed their crimes before October 1995, when the database was established. State officials removed the one name in question in that case but maintained that federal law required them to keep older cases in the database.
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By Joanne Chen and Joanne Chen,New York Times News Service | June 26, 2005
A woman in her 50s vacationing in South America was touring a chocolate factory when its owner asked, "Who wants to be covered in chocolate?" The spunky gal, who'd had a bit to drink -- or so the story goes -- obliged. She woke the next morning to find she had, not a hangover but, lo and behold, extremely soft skin. "It was amazing," said John Scharffenberger, a chocolatier in Berkeley, Calif., who retells the legend every chance he gets. "The results lasted for weeks." As a founder of Scharffen Berger, the maker of famously dense, dark Nibby Bars, Scharffenberger has more than a passing interest in the stuff.
NEWS
By Justin George and Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | April 12, 2014
Passengers boarding the Grandeur of the Seas arrived Saturday at the port of Baltimore carrying their luggage, hopes for a relaxing vacation and, in some cases, extra vitamins to ward off illnesses that have plagued the ship's last two voyages. "We're very concerned, especially because it's been onboard twice," said Gwen Rivera of Millersville, Pa., who planned to make her 13-year-old son, Brock, swallow some Vitamin C as soon as they boarded the Royal Caribbean cruiseliner. Her apprehension was shared by many passengers after learning that the Grandeur of the Seas had been struck by a second outbreak of a gastrointestinal illness in the past two voyages.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | June 2, 1997
They scrub at sunrise, before thousands of tourists arrive.They scrub as a tribute, cleaning dirt away from the 58,000 chiseled names and polishing the black granite surface of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial.They scrub because if war claimed their lives, these volunteers would want someone to care for their memory, too.For seven years, on the first Sunday of each month, the men and women of the 89th Maintenance Squadron have come to the wall in Washington from Andrews Air Force Base in Prince George's County to help protect one of the nation's most famous landmarks.
NEWS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN STAFF | April 17, 2005
With all the talk this spring about the fashionable full skirt, some may be wondering: Whatever happened to a nice pair of good ol' pants? Because all skirts and no pants makes spring a pretty dull season. Thank goodness Express didn't forget about our two-legged friends. Express has introduced a new, sexy pair of pants called the Correspondent. Unlike its cousin, the popular Editor pants -- which are made for those straight-up-and-down gals -- these trousers are fitted for the curvier among us. The fit is contoured through the hip, with a clean drape in the leg. The introductory stretch fabric comes in black, charcoal, natural, golden brown and striped.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson | August 5, 2007
"Measles make you bumpy. And mumps'll make you lumpy. And chicken pox'll make you jump and twitch," the Coasters warned us eons ago. "But poison ivy, Lord'll make you itch." You can be on red alert all summer for poison ivy and its evil cousins, poison sumac and poison oak, but when your number's up, there's not much you can do. Cortaid is selling a scrub and wipes that remove urushiol, the oily substance that makes you bumpy and scratchy. The scrub comes in a kit ($30) that includes a spray to cover the affected area to allow healing.
FEATURES
By Dolly Merritt | July 3, 1993
Around the house* For a festive July Fourth, arrange small paper sandwich bags around outside deck or patio. Fill partially with sand or cat litter and position a candle inside. When the candle is lighted, bags will glow. Make sure the bags are safely placed away from children, pets and clothing.* Wash fabric cushions from outdoor furniture with one part dishwashing liquid to four parts water. Scrub fabric with suds. Wipe off with a clean, damp sponge.* To sweep up broken glass, try using a slice of bread that will attract tiny fragments.
FEATURES
By Dolly Merritt | September 17, 1994
Around the house* Anchor curling area rugs. Fasten a piece of linoleum under each corner with a fabric adhesive.* Use the wide part of the ironing board when pressing curtains, tablecloths or other large pieces of fabric, so you can iron a larger area.* Remove grime from countertop grout. Moisten a dry sponge or clean cloth with hydrogen peroxide and wipe between tiles.* Reinforce tissue-paper sewing patterns with iron-on interfacing. Patterns will be sturdy and pliable.In the garden* Scrub flowerpots and containers thoroughly before storing.
FEATURES
By Dolly Merritt | November 26, 1994
Around the house* To speed up cleaning, use a 25-foot-long extension cord with your vacuum cleaner; this will avoid interruptions of searching for an outlet and plugging and unplugging.* Clean a stained mattress with foaming upholstery shampoo. Follow directions on label. Allow mattress to dry completely before putting on sheets.* Scrub porcelain enamel tubs and sinks with a solution of hot water and dishwasher detergent. The mixture is nonabrasive and won't hurt the shiny finish.* Prevent waxed paper from sliding when rolling out dough.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | April 29, 2012
In their quest to cure Baltimore's ailing harbor, advocates and authorities have tried one gadget after another: floating wetlands, a solar-powered aerator, even a trash wheel. Add now the "algal turf scrubber," a long wooden sluiceway through which harbor water is pumped over a bed of slimy green algae. The gutter, 350 feet long by a foot wide, uses native algae to strip nutrients, suspended sediment and carbon from water and inject oxygen into it before returning it to the harbor.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | January 9, 2011
It is, perhaps, the seminal moment in American literature. Young Huck Finn, trying to get right with God and save his soul from a forever of fire, sits there with the freshly written note in hand. "Miss Watson," it says, "your runaway n----- Jim is down here two mile below Pikesville and Mr. Phelps has got him and he will give him up for the reward if you send. " Huck knows it is a sin to steal, and he is whipped by guilt for the role he has played in helping the slave Jim steal himself from a poor old woman who never did Huck any harm.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa, The Baltimore Sun | June 24, 2010
Every so often on the TV show "Scrubs," an a capella group known as Ted's Band makes a cameo, singing a TV theme song or another quirky cover. Ted's Band is a real quartet called The Blanks, who, when it's not taping for "Scrubs," sings cover songs and performs sketch comedy at clubs around the country. In 2004, the quartet released an album of covers and vignettes with actors from "Scrubs" called "Riding the Wave." Sunday, the band will be at Rams Head on Stage in Annapolis. In interviews, band member Sam Lloyd, who plays the character Ted on "Scrubs," and fellow Blanks performer Philip McNiven have an off-the-cuff rapport and a dry sense of humor that blurs fact and fiction.
NEWS
February 23, 2010
What a surprise to see an article praising Constellation Energy on the front page of The Sun this Saturday ("A new smokestack cleans Baltimore's air," Feb. 20). This is good news for the citizens of Baltimore as they will be breathing cleaner air than they have been in the past. It is amazing that the new technology has made the Brandon Shores Power Plant a virtual non-air polluter. The article also mentions a cost of $1.5 billion for the pollution abatement for this project and others for a utility that provides power for 1 million households.
FEATURES
By DAVID ZURAWIK | February 9, 2010
Remember the pilot for a Fox series about reincarnation that filmed in Baltimore last year? It was based on the book "The Reincarnationist," by MJ Rose, and it starred Kelli Giddish, of the soap opera "All My Children," as a psychologist who specializes in past life regression. Well, it premieres at 9 tonight on Fox as a weekly drama titled "Past Life," but don't expect to be bowled over by Baltimore landmarks and imagery in the pilot. Fox and the producers chose to film in Atlanta rather than Baltimore once the pilot was given the green light as a series.
NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN | April 12, 2009
If saloon-smashing Carry Nation had her ax, then the late Mary M. Avara had her scissors. And if Avara were alive today and still head of the now-defunct Maryland State Board of Motion Picture Censors, those students down there at College Park viewing Pirates II: Stagnetti's Revenge last week might not have been watching it at all if she decided to excise its sex scenes with her scissors or outright ban its showing. The Baltimore Sun reported that more than 100 students took in the pornographic film that in recent weeks pitted lawmakers, who had threatened to withhold funding from the University of Maryland, against anxious university officials, who in the wake of such a threat canceled the screening.
FEATURES
October 5, 1991
Around the house* Buttons that have been sewn on with elastic thread are ideal for people with limited dexterity. Buttons can be grasped more easily and garment may not need to be unbuttoned at all.* Avoid cluttering a drawer with scarves. Thread through holes been punched into the paper that covers wire hangers.* Store electric cords in cardboard cylinders saved from paper towels or kitchen wraps to avoid tangling when placed in drawers or on shelves.In the garden* Scrub flower pots and containers thoroughly before storing for the winter.
FEATURES
By Dolly Merritt | November 17, 1990
Around the house* Organize closet by category (slacks, shirts, shoes) and by color. When in a hurry, you'll be able to find clothing quickly.* To retain the shape of a freshly laundered sweater, spread flat over a child's safety gate that has been stretched across the bathtub.* Store bridal dress and veil or other formal wear. Wrap in blue tissue paper or jeweler's tissue paper that is acid-free and will block light. Place garment in plastic bag.* Scrub porcelain enamel tubs and sinks with a solution of hot water and dishwasher detergent.
BUSINESS
By KEN HARNEY | November 2, 2008
With foreclosures, short sales and credit card defaults at record levels, an aggressive breed of firms has sprung up offering to power-wash consumers' damaged credit files and boost credit scores, thereby eliminating records of bankruptcies and mortgage delinquencies, even when the information is accurate. Such services - promoted on the Internet and in radio ads - are attractive to people who want to buy a house but whose credit scores are too low for a mortgage through the Federal Housing Administration, Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac. The problem with these companies, say federal and state authorities, is that their promises may be deceptive and illegal.
NEWS
By LAURA VOZZELLA and LAURA VOZZELLA,laura.vozzella@baltsun.com | October 29, 2008
Chef Rock Harper told a roomful of aspiring chefs - no doubt a few of them aspiring celebrity chefs - not to expect instant success. The winner of TV's Hell's Kitchen, who addressed students at the National Academy Foundation High School in Federal Hill yesterday, seems to have achieved just that. As the last chef standing in the Fox reality TV show, he landed a $250,000 one-year contract as head chef at Las Vegas' Terra Verde. But years of training and hard work came before that big break, Harper told the students, two of them wearing toques.
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