Advertisement
HomeCollectionsScreenwriter
IN THE NEWS

Screenwriter

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
November 23, 2007
63 Joe Eszterhas Screenwriter 53 Bruce Hornsby Singer 47 Robin Roberts TV personality 31 Page Kennedy Actor 15 Miley Cyrus Actress
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | February 17, 2011
Maryland native Alfred Gough may be the most popular purveyor of small-town drama, comedy and romance since Frank Capra. He and his writing-producing partner, Miles Millar, developed TV's "Smallville" series, about Clark Kent's Kansas youth, then stayed with the show for seven years. They also wrote the current big fantasy film, "I Am Number Four," about a virtuous alien hiding in Paradise, Ohio, from some dastardly extraterrestrials. "Smallville" and "I Am Number Four" derive suspense and humor from the friction between otherworldly mayhem and cozy Americana.
Advertisement
NEWS
May 13, 2007
BERNARD GORDON, 88 Blacklisted screenwriter Bernard Gordon, a screenwriter blacklisted during Hollywood's anti-Communist crusade in the 1950s, has died. He was 88. Mr. Gordon died Friday at his Hollywood Hills, Calif., home after a long battle with cancer, according to his daughter, Ellen Gordon. Mr. Gordon wrote dozens of movies but many never carried his name until the Writers Guild of America began restoring credits to blacklisted writers in 1980. About a dozen of Mr. Gordon's credits were restored, more than any other writer, said Dave Robb, a longtime friend.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | January 14, 2011
Just in time for Edgar Allan Poe's birthday on Wednesday, Hollywood filmmakers in Belgrade have wrapped an extravagant present. Last week, director James McTeigue, who guided Natalie Portman through "V for Vendetta," completed principal photography on "The Raven," a thriller starring John Cusack as Baltimore's classic yet still controversial man of letters. In this ambitious pastiche, set in the last five days of his life, Poe is more than a poet, critic and fiction writer. He becomes a detective seeking a serial killer who has designed his crimes to echo Poe's stories.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | October 25, 2001
The Dying Gaul, a psychological thriller that unfolds in Tinseltown and cyberspace, opens tomorrowat Fell's Point Corner Theatre. Written by playwright and screenwriter Craig Lucas (Prelude to a Kiss, Reckless), The Dying Gaul focuses on a screenwriter whose integrity is compromised when a film producer demands major changes in a screenplay. The Fell's Point Corner Theatre's production is directed by Steve Goldklang and features Stephen Antonsen, Patrick Martyn, William Runnebaum and Susan Scher.
FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder News Service | February 18, 1992
New Line Cinema has nabbed "The Player," Robert Altman's scathing black comedy about the movie business.Virtually every studio in Hollywood was bidding to distribute the independently financed picture, based on Michael Tolkin's novel and starring Tim Robbins as a hotshot studio executive who kills a struggling screenwriter -- and then seduces the screenwriter's girlfriend.According to Variety editor Peter Bart, writing in the current issue, "Hollywood's new favorite indoor sport is trying to figure out which industry figure each of the lead characters is modeled after.
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Times | December 28, 1990
Films going into production:''The Dark Half,'' shooting in Pittsburgh. Horror maven George Romero exec produces, writes and directs this chiller starring Tim Hutton, Amy Madigan, Michael Rooker and Julie Harris. Hutton plays an author whose life, along with his murderous subjects, is shown in detail."The Linguini Incident," shooting in New York and Los Angeles. Rosanna Arquette heads an eccentric cast (David Bowie, Marlee Matlin and Shelley Winters) in an equally quirky scenario. Arquette is a waitress, with aspirations as an escape artist, who deals with life, stress and unusual characters in the big city.
FEATURES
By Kevin Brown | September 20, 1990
The Baltimore Film Forum will present four Latino films by screenwriter Gabriel Garcia Marquez in a film series titled "Amores Dificiles," (Dangerous Loves). Tonight's screening will be "Milagro En Roma" (Miracle In Rome). Tomorrow's film is "El Verano de la Senora Forbes" (The Summer of Miss Forbes).Next Thursday will be "Un Senor Muy Viejo Con Unas Alas Enormes" (A Very Old Man with Enormous Arms), and on Sept. 28 will be "Fabula de la Bella Palomera" (Fable of the Beautiful Pigeon-Fancier)
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach | November 1, 2003
Love Actually, the latest film from English screenwriter Richard Curtis (Four Weddings and a Funeral, Notting Hill, Bridget Jones' Diary), is this weekend's scheduled feature at Cinema Sundays at the Charles Theatre. The film's all-star cast, playing a group of witty folk engaged in amusing romantic entanglements, includes Hugh Grant, Emma Thompson, Alan Rickman, Liam Neeson, Colin Firth, Keira Knightley and Rowan Atkinson. Love Actually marks Curtis' first film as both writer and director.
FEATURES
By Larry Hackett and Larry Hackett,New York Daily News | April 21, 1992
If Hollywood were interested only in producing great art, screenwriters would be L.A. royalty. But the movie business is really about making money, which is why writers must act like court jesters, are treated like serfs -- and sometimes are paid like kings."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | December 22, 2010
Screenwriter David Seidler knew he was treading a royal-blue carpet studded with land mines when he tackled "The King's Speech. " But nothing would deter him from telling that rarity - an inspirational story that actually is inspirational. Seidler, born in Britain and brought to the United States as a boy during World War II, revered King George VI ( Colin Firth) as a steadfast monarch and a personal hero. George VI conquered a merciless stammer: the same obstacle that afflicted Seidler in his youth.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | April 30, 2010
This year, the summer season starts not on Memorial Day, and not the week before, but on Mother's Day weekend. It starts when " Iron Man 2" says it does: May 7. When you have a franchise as beloved and potent as this one, you get to set the terms of engagement. Director Jon Favreau and his new screenwriter, Justin Theroux, have tried hard not to squander audiences' loyalty to the wicked-smart superhero Robert Downey Jr. introduced in the first "Iron Man." Mistrust of government, turmoil in Russia, corporate espionage — all the elements of our daily headlines are given a cheeky spin in the new adventures of our favorite shellhead.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik | April 1, 2010
The death of 48-year-old screenwriter David Mills, who won an Emmy for his work on the Baltimore production of HBO's "The Corner," hit members of the Maryland- Hollywood TV and film communities hard Wednesday. Mr. Mills, who was born in Maryland and started his writing career as a reporter at the University of Maryland student-run newspaper The Diamondback, collapsed Tuesday in New Orleans on the set of the HBO drama "Treme." He died in a New Orleans hospital, according to series creator David Simon.
NEWS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg and Kevin Van Valkenburg,kevin.vanvalkenburg@baltsun.com | December 31, 2008
Ravens defensive end Trevor Pryce was walking through a suburban mall one day, holding the tiny hand of his daughter, Khary, when she asked him a question that shaped the second act of his already unique American life. Stopping at a mall fountain, Khary gazed down at the hundreds of pennies and wondered aloud what would happen if the pennies got mixed up and you got the wrong wish? Pryce laughed, not really sure what to say. His daughter moved on to other things, but for Pryce, the idea lingered.
FEATURES
November 23, 2007
63 Joe Eszterhas Screenwriter 53 Bruce Hornsby Singer 47 Robin Roberts TV personality 31 Page Kennedy Actor 15 Miley Cyrus Actress
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun reporter | October 21, 2007
The tale of Adam R. Fein is proof that talent and persistence can trump even poor judgment. Twice, he turned down offers to write Hollywood screenplays. But this month, Fein signed a six-figure, multi-option deal with New York-based Lucky Monkey Pictures. He's penning a romantic comedy, Dead Broke, working off a story by Lucky Monkey President Lauren Versel and Los Angeles-based producer-writer Arleen Sorkin, whose last collaboration was on the Jennifer Aniston comedy Picture Perfect. Fein took some screenwriting courses while at Syracuse University.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | November 13, 1996
The dogs in John Patrick Shanley's "Four Dogs and a Bone" are a producer, a screenwriter and two actresses. The bone they're fighting over is the movie they're shooting. And they will do anything to get what they want.Here's what they want: The actresses want bigger roles, the screenwriter wants his script to appear on screen unscathed and the producer wants -- make that "needs" -- to bring an $8 million movie in on a $5 million budget.Judging from his characters' language (some of it X-rated)
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Theater Critic | April 30, 1992
There's a long tradition of writers writing about writing and there's a tradition at least as long of stories about the seemingly good-and-noble selling their souls to the devil. For Australian screenwriter David Williamson, "Emerald City" is the magical land where the two traditions meet.The play, which is receiving its Baltimore premiere at Theatre Hopkins, is heavy on chat and short on action. Nor does it help that the primary issue being chatted up is the definition of success -- not the most dramatic of subjects.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun reporter | October 5, 2007
Kevin Barnett was never much of a film buff. But he liked funny. The work of Bobby and Peter Farrelly - the determined moronics of Dumb and Dumber, the overwrought rivalries of Kingpin, the strange hair gels of There's Something About Mary - now, that was funny! Wouldn't it be something if he, a frustrated twentysomething financial adviser riding out the 1990s, could work with them? Dream on, right? Fast-forward eight years. The Timonium native, thanks to equal measures of persistence, grit and plain dumb luck, is indeed working alongside the Farrellys.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.