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FEATURES
By Rob Kasper | May 25, 1991
The bugs are a-buzzing, and that means it is the season to repair the screen door.For me it is a job that lasts for months. No matter how many times I plug up the holes, new openings appear within days and the bugs are back.Fixing a screen door is like trying to fix campaign-finance laws, or the federal deficit. You could make a career out of it.I have worked both sides of the screen door.As an adult, I am now a defender of the door. I am the one who scolds anyone who threatens it. Who instinctively yells "Watch the door," when baseball bats or lacrosse sticks or broom handles venture near it. Maybe that is why one of our kids used to call it the "scream" door.
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NEWS
By Luke Lavoie, llavoie@tribune.com | October 2, 2013
The following is compiled from police reports. The Columbia Flier includes descriptions of perpetrators only when the description makes identification possible. Cloudleap Court,  8700 block, 9:10 p.m. Sept. 24. Two masked men entered Long Reach Pizza. One pointed handgun at victim while other went behind counter. Victim ordered to open register. Victim complied and gave cash from register to men. Both fled toward Old Dobbin Lane. In other news from the Crime Log: East Columbia Guilford Road, 8600 block, 1:28 a.m. Sept.
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FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | May 10, 2003
THE SCREEN door panel emerged from winter storage in sorry shape. There was a tear running along the bottom edge, an opening that the backyard mosquitoes - those pesky Asian tigers - would be certain to exploit. So I measured the height and width of the panel, bought a piece of new screen that was several inches longer and wider than my measurements, and went to work in the back yard. It was pleasant duty. It was a glorious spring afternoon. I set up operations on a table underneath the blooming dogwood tree, its bright pink blossoms lighting up the landscape.
NEWS
Letter to The Record and The Aegis | July 2, 2013
Editor: I lift the lid off the writhing pot on my stove and inhale deeply. The aroma of Old Bay seasoning and the briny crab reaches my nose, a smell so familiar and so comforting. Their bright red bodies smeared wholly with that special seasoning wipes away the fact that a mere hour earlier the pots contents were in a cooler on the floor, scratching and pinching, and blue. Placing the lid carefully back down, I turn my attention to the sweet corn, its smell dispersing through the kitchen alarming those present it is ready to be eaten, the broth milky and corn silk floating along in a one note soup.
FEATURES
By Jacques Kelly | August 1, 1998
ONE MORNING this week, I was out for a walk hours before the mercury started getting frisky. On my route through the streets about a mile from my home, at the hour when people have their toast and coffee, I spotted wide-open front doors shielded only by a summertime screen.I thought to myself: Fear of crime must be down, way down. People are believing in the power of screen doors again. Isn't this what a good, old Baltimore summer is all about?One of my great satisfactions is to open my screen door early on a summer morning, let the fresh air in, and get the house cooled down before everything has be locked up tighter than a steamer trunk.
NEWS
March 17, 1993
POLICE LOG* Long Reach: 9000 block of Watchlight Court: A second window screen of a residence was cut between 6:10 p.m. and 9:30 p.m. Thursday.9100 block of Lambskin Lane: Someone attempted to enter a residence through a screen door and also attempted to enter the main door before fleeing on foot between 11:20 a.m. and 11:30 a.m. Friday.
NEWS
October 14, 1992
* Savage: 8300 block of Autumn Way: A resident heard voices and the sound of her screen door being removed on Sunday. The suspects fled without the door when the resident got up.*8800 block of Washington St.: Someone attempted to remove window screens from a rear window between Friday and Sunday. No entry was gained.* North Laurel: 10000 block of Route 1: There was a domestic disturbance in the Crest Trailer Park.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | October 5, 2002
HOUSE PARTS, like hippies, have a tendency to drop out. For any teen-agers in the audience who don't know what hippies are, the short answer is they used to be your parents. When your parents were much younger, they spouted off about peace, love and freedom. Now they advocate curfews, driving restrictions and mandatory testing. Eons ago, dropping out was a popular concept. Roughly translated it meant getting out of the mainstream, getting in touch with your feelings and not working too hard.
FEATURES
By Jennifer Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun Media Group | June 27, 2013
Loud noises are a major source of strife and irritation for mothers of napping babies everywhere. (Or maybe it's just me?) Once the princess is asleep, shouldn't it be the unified mission of the household -- nay, the broader community -- to maintain ideal conditions for slumber? They say babies can sleep through a lot, but that hasn't stopped me from spiraling into a panic upon hearing the following. I sometimes catch myself (whispering) aloud: "Are you serious?!" (Note: A self-reality-check usually follows.)
NEWS
By Orange County Register | April 25, 1995
WESTMINSTER, Calif. -- As Steven Tran closed the front door behind 25 pesticide bombs clustered on the floor, he thought he had seen the last cockroach waltz through his house.Instead, Mr. Tran blasted his screen door into a yard across the street, blew out all of his windows, melted his brown carpet and set his furniture ablaze."I really wanted to kill all of them," Mr. Tran said after Saturday night's blast. "I thought if I use a lot more it lasts me longer."No one was injured in the explosion and fire, which caused about $10,000 in damage to Mr. Tran's first-floor apartment, fire Capt.
FEATURES
By Jennifer Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun Media Group | June 27, 2013
Loud noises are a major source of strife and irritation for mothers of napping babies everywhere. (Or maybe it's just me?) Once the princess is asleep, shouldn't it be the unified mission of the household -- nay, the broader community -- to maintain ideal conditions for slumber? They say babies can sleep through a lot, but that hasn't stopped me from spiraling into a panic upon hearing the following. I sometimes catch myself (whispering) aloud: "Are you serious?!" (Note: A self-reality-check usually follows.)
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | July 23, 2004
Baltimore County police said yesterday that they plan to arrest, upon his release from the hospital, a man who was shot in the buttock Monday by a witness who said he saw the man burglarizing a Lansdowne home. Vander Davis Jr., 36, of the 2500 block of Ridgely St. in Baltimore was being watched by correctional officers at the University of Maryland Medical Center, where he was being treated last night, police said. His injuries are not life-threatening, police said. An arrest warrant charges Davis with burglary, second-degree assault, malicious destruction of property and theft in an incident Monday afternoon.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | December 21, 2003
Cornell Anderson Jr. shuffled down a dark, tree-lined alley on a warm spring night in North Baltimore when he spotted light seeping from a rowhouse's rear screen door. No longer high, he felt groggy as he stared at his next target. Slipping a small knife from his pocket, Anderson slashed through the screen, popped the latch and stepped inside. His eyes adjusted to the light as he grabbed a cellular phone and a black leather purse from a kitchen countertop. He hustled down a narrow hallway, swiping a leather bag dangling from the handle of the front door.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | May 10, 2003
THE SCREEN door panel emerged from winter storage in sorry shape. There was a tear running along the bottom edge, an opening that the backyard mosquitoes - those pesky Asian tigers - would be certain to exploit. So I measured the height and width of the panel, bought a piece of new screen that was several inches longer and wider than my measurements, and went to work in the back yard. It was pleasant duty. It was a glorious spring afternoon. I set up operations on a table underneath the blooming dogwood tree, its bright pink blossoms lighting up the landscape.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | October 5, 2002
HOUSE PARTS, like hippies, have a tendency to drop out. For any teen-agers in the audience who don't know what hippies are, the short answer is they used to be your parents. When your parents were much younger, they spouted off about peace, love and freedom. Now they advocate curfews, driving restrictions and mandatory testing. Eons ago, dropping out was a popular concept. Roughly translated it meant getting out of the mainstream, getting in touch with your feelings and not working too hard.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | September 23, 2001
Start simple. That's the strategy Peabody Award-winning filmmakers Louis Alvarez and Andrew Kolker say they used to capture one of the most elusive concepts and least understood realities in our lives: social class in America. "That was our challenge: to figure out how you get Americans to confront an issue that a lot of people don't have anything to say about -- or, at least, think they don't have anything to say about," Alvarez said in a telephone interview last week. "At first, we didn't really know what to do at all. Then we said, 'Let's do the incredibly basic thing of cutting out some pictures from magazines, putting them on a black background, taking them out on the street and asking people about them.
NEWS
By Helen K. Liberman | July 28, 1997
I ESCAPE the heat and humidity of a Baltimore summer by entering the air-conditioned world of my home. Even though the outside world has become a steamy biosphere, the inside world has remained exactly the same . . .except for the cooling breezes wafting from the vents.Silently the door closes behind me. When was the last time you heard a screen door bang? That sound used to be a sure sign that summer had arrived.After a winter of closing the heavy glass-panel storm door, the lightweight wooden screen door had a way of flying out of my hand to land with a resounding bang.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | July 23, 2004
Baltimore County police said yesterday that they plan to arrest, upon his release from the hospital, a man who was shot in the buttock Monday by a witness who said he saw the man burglarizing a Lansdowne home. Vander Davis Jr., 36, of the 2500 block of Ridgely St. in Baltimore was being watched by correctional officers at the University of Maryland Medical Center, where he was being treated last night, police said. His injuries are not life-threatening, police said. An arrest warrant charges Davis with burglary, second-degree assault, malicious destruction of property and theft in an incident Monday afternoon.
NEWS
By MATTHEW OLSHAN | June 13, 2001
THE DISAPPEARANCE of the box at my front door called for some sleuthing. "I'll leave the press kits outside for you," I had told my publisher. But someone else had gotten there first. I had heard the screen door opening, usually a sign of the mailman. But it was too early for the mail. And I was on the phone with my publisher, so it couldn't be him. I ran downstairs, threw open the door - and, sure enough, the box was gone. I did the only sensible thing: I went down the street after the thief.
BUSINESS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | September 10, 2000
Screen doors have survived for many years as household accessories because of their simplicity and pure usefulness: They let fresh air into a home, and keep bugs out. Today's homeowners have several newer choices when picking a screen for their doors. A basic screen hangs like a drape over the door opening; just push it aside to go in or out. A version of this type of screen, which is attached to the top of the doorway with hook-and-loop fasteners, is available for about $20 from Improvements, at 800-642-2112 or www.improvementscatalog.
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