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By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,SUN STAFF | November 22, 1998
Actor Giancarlo Esposito isn't a Rugrat, a Barney or even a recognizable name for many elementary schoolchildren.But the new cast member in the Baltimore-based television show "Homicide: Life on the Street" has something that he hopes will make children at Garrett Heights Elementary School take notice: an ability to make stories come alive.The belief that actors are storytellers extraordinaire, who can make children understand the magic of literature, prompted the Screen Actors Guild Foundation to begin reading to Los Angeles children years ago. Today, its BookPals program has spread to more than a dozen large cities and 30,000 schoolchildren.
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NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | April 28, 2014
Republican gubernatorial hopeful Ron George usually keeps quiet about the flashiest part of his biography. But as he fielded a question about film tax credits at a candidates forum last week, George let slip that he had a brief and unglamorous career as a daytime soap opera actor. "I got to die once and come back a couple months later," George told a crowd at the University of Maryland law school. That's not all. The Republican delegate from Anne Arundel County is still a card-carrying member of the Screen Actors Guild, he said, a distinction that over the decades has earned him bit parts in various productions.
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NEWS
August 5, 1994
* Bert Freed, 74, a character actor for five decades and longtime officer of the Screen Actors Guild, died of heart failure late Tuesday while vacationing near Vancouver, British Columbia. Born in New York, Mr. Freed made his Broadway debut in 1943 in "Johnny 2 x 4." He subsequently appeared in several stage plays, some 75 films and more than 200 television programs. He served on the board of the Screen Actors Guild from 1969 to 1989, and was its first vice president, a trustee of its Producers' Pension and Health Plans and founding chairman of its Seniors Committee.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | December 12, 2013
Baltimore-made "Veep" and "House of Cards," and stars Julia Louis-Dreyfus and Kevin Spacey came up big in Golden Globe nominations announced Thursday. Dreyfus was nominated as best actress both in film and TV comedy by the Hollywood Foreign Press Association. The film nomination came for her work in "Enough Said," while the TV nod was for "Veep," the HBO political satire that features Louis-Dreyfus as Vice President Selina Meyer, "House of Cards," the Netflix political thriller, picked up four major nominations.
NEWS
May 5, 1992
George Murphy, 89, a Hollywood song-and-dance man who appeared in 55 films and became a U.S. senator from California, died Sunday of leukemia at his home in Palm Beach, Calif. His movies included "This is the Army," with Ronald Reagan and Irving Berlin. He began as a dancer in nightclubs, reached Broadway in 1927 with Julie Johnson, his partner and later wife, and established himself in movies by the mid-1930s. The former Democrat registered as a Republican in 1939 and became active in politics.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | December 12, 2012
Actors seem to love HBO's filmed-in-Baltimore "Game Change. " But the likewise filmed-in-Baltimore HBO series "Veep?" Not so much. Nominations for this year's Screen Actors Guild awards were announced this morning, and they proved a mixed bag for Baltimore-based production and talent. "Game Change," HBO's take on the candidate-selection process that saw Sarah Palin receive the GOP vice-presidential nod in 2008, earned nominations for all three of its leads - Julianne Moore for female actor in a television movie or miniseries, and Woody Harrelson and Ed Harris for lead actor in a television movie or mini-series.
NEWS
January 14, 1994
* Johan Jorgen Holst, 56, the Norwegian foreign minister who led secret talks that forged the Israel-PLO peace accord and who pledged to pursue peace "as long as there is life in me," died yesterday in Oslo, Norway, after a stroke. He was discovered dead in his hospital bed after suffering his second stroke in two months. He had been foreign minister less than 10 months. Israeli and PLO leaders mourned his death and praised his contribution to their historic agreement for limited Palestinian self-rule in the Gaza Strip and Jericho area of the West Bank.
NEWS
February 24, 2008
In a Jan. 28 post on the National Book Critics Circle blog Critical Mass, former San Francisco Chronicle Style editor Paul Wilner lamented that at the Screen Actors Guild Awards, "almost no actual writers were acknowledged for their contributions" to the winning films. "I waited in vain to hear ... Cormac McCarthy mentioned in conjunction with the multiple honors for No Country for Old Men," Wilner wrote, "or a nod to ... Alice Munro for the short story upon which Away From Her was based.
FEATURES
By Michael Kenney and Michael Kenney,Boston Globe | March 17, 1994
In October 1947, Ronald Reagan testified at the House Un-American Activities Committee hearings on communist influence in Hollywood. He "created something of a stir," according to a report in Motion Picture Daily, with his "affirmation of . . . American democracy, in and out of Hollywood."But, writes University of Wisconsin communications professor Stephen Vaughn in his absorbing -- but unsettling -- study of Mr. Reagan as actor-politician, Mr. Reagan was an informer for the FBI, complete with a code name, "T-10."
FEATURES
By David Tobenkin and David Tobenkin,Los Angeles Daily News | March 19, 1992
LOS ANGELES -- Hollywood is in penny-pinching mode.Studios typically known for their extravagances are taking second and third looks at the salaries of many well-known actors -- and making some changes.The new cost consciousness has nearly halved the salaries of some Hollywood stars and led to stricter access on the perks that many have come to expect.Studios increasingly are unwilling to provide stars with such niceties as free air fare for relatives and friends, assistants, and luxurious mobile homes for location work.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, For The Baltimore Sun | April 11, 2013
Subscribers and friends of Compass Rose Theater Company had major cause for celebration last month with the opening of the troupe's new theater home in the Annapolis Arts District. The redeveloped 2,900-square-foot space at 49 Spa Road now has a full lobby, classroom, library and a large backstage area for performers and dressing rooms, with a ceiling height of 25 feet and a 10-by-25-foot stage. Designed by Severna Park-based theater architect Gary Martinez, the theater comfortably seats 70. Martinez described it as "a dynamic space for a dynamic company," and Lucinda Merry-Browne, founder and artistic director of Compass Rose, called the theater "the realization of the dream of a lifetime.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | December 12, 2012
Actors seem to love HBO's filmed-in-Baltimore "Game Change. " But the likewise filmed-in-Baltimore HBO series "Veep?" Not so much. Nominations for this year's Screen Actors Guild awards were announced this morning, and they proved a mixed bag for Baltimore-based production and talent. "Game Change," HBO's take on the candidate-selection process that saw Sarah Palin receive the GOP vice-presidential nod in 2008, earned nominations for all three of its leads - Julianne Moore for female actor in a television movie or miniseries, and Woody Harrelson and Ed Harris for lead actor in a television movie or mini-series.
NEWS
February 24, 2008
In a Jan. 28 post on the National Book Critics Circle blog Critical Mass, former San Francisco Chronicle Style editor Paul Wilner lamented that at the Screen Actors Guild Awards, "almost no actual writers were acknowledged for their contributions" to the winning films. "I waited in vain to hear ... Cormac McCarthy mentioned in conjunction with the multiple honors for No Country for Old Men," Wilner wrote, "or a nod to ... Alice Munro for the short story upon which Away From Her was based.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach | February 1, 2008
Hollywood legends are a funny thing. They're not always a matter of longevity; if they were, there would be no more revered figure in movie history than Lillian Gish, and how many people younger than 40 have even heard of her? They don't necessarily reflect youth snuffed out before its time; Brad Renfro's recent death, though undeniably tragic, hasn't guaranteed him a spot in the Hollywood firmament. And they don't necessarily have much to do with the quality of the work. Deborah Kerr was an extraordinarily gifted actress with a surprising range, but you don't see her image turning up on key chains and Internet tributes.
FEATURES
By Susan King and Susan King,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 11, 2003
HOLLYWOOD - In the last of the major ceremonial awards in Hollywood's run-up to the Oscars, Daniel Day-Lewis was chosen best male actor for his wicked turn as Bill the Butcher in Gangs of New York, and Renee Zellweger was named best female actor as the merry murderess in the musical Chicago on Sunday night at the ninth annual Screen Actors Guild Awards. Chicago also took the award for best movie ensemble, and Catherine Zeta-Jones was named best supporting female actor. The remaining movie honor went to Christopher Walken, who received the supporting male actor prize for his emotional turn as the down-on-his-luck father of a teen-age con artist in the caper film Catch Me If You Can. Although competition this year is strong, with its additional awards Chicago would appear to be the film to beat at the Academy Awards.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,SUN STAFF | November 22, 1998
Actor Giancarlo Esposito isn't a Rugrat, a Barney or even a recognizable name for many elementary schoolchildren.But the new cast member in the Baltimore-based television show "Homicide: Life on the Street" has something that he hopes will make children at Garrett Heights Elementary School take notice: an ability to make stories come alive.The belief that actors are storytellers extraordinaire, who can make children understand the magic of literature, prompted the Screen Actors Guild Foundation to begin reading to Los Angeles children years ago. Today, its BookPals program has spread to more than a dozen large cities and 30,000 schoolchildren.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach | February 1, 2008
Hollywood legends are a funny thing. They're not always a matter of longevity; if they were, there would be no more revered figure in movie history than Lillian Gish, and how many people younger than 40 have even heard of her? They don't necessarily reflect youth snuffed out before its time; Brad Renfro's recent death, though undeniably tragic, hasn't guaranteed him a spot in the Hollywood firmament. And they don't necessarily have much to do with the quality of the work. Deborah Kerr was an extraordinarily gifted actress with a surprising range, but you don't see her image turning up on key chains and Internet tributes.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, For The Baltimore Sun | April 11, 2013
Subscribers and friends of Compass Rose Theater Company had major cause for celebration last month with the opening of the troupe's new theater home in the Annapolis Arts District. The redeveloped 2,900-square-foot space at 49 Spa Road now has a full lobby, classroom, library and a large backstage area for performers and dressing rooms, with a ceiling height of 25 feet and a 10-by-25-foot stage. Designed by Severna Park-based theater architect Gary Martinez, the theater comfortably seats 70. Martinez described it as "a dynamic space for a dynamic company," and Lucinda Merry-Browne, founder and artistic director of Compass Rose, called the theater "the realization of the dream of a lifetime.
NEWS
August 5, 1994
* Bert Freed, 74, a character actor for five decades and longtime officer of the Screen Actors Guild, died of heart failure late Tuesday while vacationing near Vancouver, British Columbia. Born in New York, Mr. Freed made his Broadway debut in 1943 in "Johnny 2 x 4." He subsequently appeared in several stage plays, some 75 films and more than 200 television programs. He served on the board of the Screen Actors Guild from 1969 to 1989, and was its first vice president, a trustee of its Producers' Pension and Health Plans and founding chairman of its Seniors Committee.
FEATURES
By Michael Kenney and Michael Kenney,Boston Globe | March 17, 1994
In October 1947, Ronald Reagan testified at the House Un-American Activities Committee hearings on communist influence in Hollywood. He "created something of a stir," according to a report in Motion Picture Daily, with his "affirmation of . . . American democracy, in and out of Hollywood."But, writes University of Wisconsin communications professor Stephen Vaughn in his absorbing -- but unsettling -- study of Mr. Reagan as actor-politician, Mr. Reagan was an informer for the FBI, complete with a code name, "T-10."
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