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ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | February 1, 2012
A fourth movie screen is coming to Hampden's Rotunda Cinemas. The additional screen, which will accommodate an audience of just over 100, should be ready by early May, said Ira Miller, a veteran exhibitor who has been operating the theater since May 2009. He signed the agreement with the mall's owners, New Jersey-based Hekemian & Co., earlier this week, he said. "We finally made the deal and signed it," said Miller, who has been talking about adding a fourth screen for over a year.
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HEALTH
By Kevin Rector and Scott Dance and The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2014
Federal officials announced Wednesday that they plan to screen international passengers for Ebola at five major U.S. airports, while hospitals around the country continue to isolate patients showing Ebola-like symptoms. At least four Baltimore-area hospitals recently segregated patients with travel histories and other possible indications of Ebola, though the virus was ruled out in each case. Other cases were suspected and ruled out at two Washington-area hospitals last week. Meanwhile, the first U.S. patient diagnosed with the virus died Wednesday in Dallas.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and The Baltimore Sun | June 11, 2014
Renovations to The Charles, Baltimore's 75-year-old showcase for independent cinema, will leave the theater's original -- and largest -- screen shut down through the end of the month. Workers are putting in new, roomier seating and moving the rear wall, nearest to Charles Street, forward, which will allow the adjoining Tapas Teatro restaurant to expand, said Kathleen Cusack Lyon, who operates the theater with her father, James "Buzz" Cusack. When it reopens next month, Lyon said, the original auditorium, which opened in 1939, will have a capacity of around 400 -- about 80 seats fewer than when it closed at the beginning of June.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance and The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2014
Maryland public health officials are putting caregivers - from Baltimore's major teaching hospitals to strip-mall urgent care centers to ambulances - on heightened alert for signs of Ebola as details emerge about missteps in Dallas, where a man with the deadly virus was initially sent home from a hospital. Health care providers have for months been preparing for Ebola's potential arrival in the U.S., and on Tuesday confirmed a Liberian man visiting family in Dallas had the virus.
NEWS
by Carson Porter | January 9, 2012
Ever since I saw this on Engadget before it came out I've wanted one. I don't even do first person shooter games. Maybe you can rig this thing so I can watch football while Lauren watches Glee or some documentary about whales. Anyways, regularly $399.99, temporarily slashed to $299.99 over at Best Buy .
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ann Hornaday | July 30, 2000
One of the most oft-asked questions of a film critic, especially this summer, is, "How does this stuff get made?" "This stuff," of course, refers to the dreck that regularly opens at the googol-plex every Friday. How it gets made is chronicled with vicious, mean-spirited, hilarious cynicism in "Action," a failed Fox comedy series that started rebroadcast on the FX Networks cable channel June 20. The first eight episodes of the show, which stars Jay Mohr as a rapacious movie producer and Illeana Douglas as a prostitute-turned-development-executive, chronicled the greed, lust and narcissism that fuel the movie business.
BUSINESS
By Knight-Ridder News Service rHC B | December 30, 1991
While a 'screen saver' program such as After Dark is loads of fun, do you really need one? Several experts said such software was generally a good idea, though no one had any concrete evidence, such as a study showing how they actually prolonged screen life.To the extent that it's a problem, burn-in is more often seen on monochrome screens that run text-based operating systems, such as DOS, which always put characters in the same 80-by-24 grid.Graphic systems, such as the Macintosh and Windows, tend to have a more varied screen appearance, though menu bars and certain icons can be problems because they are often in the same part of the screen.
ENTERTAINMENT
By James Coates and James Coates,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | November 27, 2003
When I run game programs on my Toshiba Tecra 8000 laptop, they fill just part of the screen display, about a 7-by-5-inch rectangle. How can I set things up so that the game programs will fill the whole 14.1-inch screen? I've tried changing the pixel dimensions in the Display/Settings/Screen area but that doesn't help. As you've found, the solution doesn't always lie with going to the screen resolution settings tab after right-clicking on the desktop and picking Properties. This is because most Windows computers don't permit settings as low as required for many games - resolutions of 640 by 480 pixels.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2000
Watching movies or playing games on a 52-inch screen can be remarkable, but it is even more so when the screen appears inside a pair of eyeglasses. That's why Sony's PLM-A35 Personal LCD Monitor Glasstron is such a big deal in portable electronics. This third-generation Glasstron is a personal theater that you wear like a pair of sunglasses. It is small, comfortable, easy on the nose and -- at 3.5 ounces -- will even fit over your prescription glasses. The Glasstron doesn't do much by itself, except display a self-test screen.
BUSINESS
By MICHAEL J. HIMOWITZ | August 23, 1993
The outraged letter from Bob was typical of several I've received lately:"I just bought a computer with a 14-inch monitor. When I got it home, I thought the screen looked a little small. So I measured it, and it was only 12 1/2 inches across. I thought maybe someone had made a mistake, so I called the store, and they said that's what you get when you buy a 14-inch monitor. Am I getting ripped off, or what?"Welcome to the fuzzy world of cathode ray tubes, an anomaly in a computer universe defined by precise specifications for just about everything else.
NEWS
By Lorraine Mirabella and The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2014
A six-screen, 752-seat theater showing first-run discounted movies will open in mid-November in the Sun Valley Shopping Center in Glen Burnie. The Sun Valley 6 is under construction as part of the remodeling of the center at the intersection of Mountain Road and Baltimore Annapolis Boulevard, said Ira Miller, president of Sun Valley Movie Theaters Inc., on Tuesday. Sun Valley will feature stadium seating, surround sound and 3-D capability in two large and four smaller theaters.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2014
Kevin Luskin comes from a Baltimore-based retail family known for building businesses on cutting-edge home products. Today, it's curved-screen, smart televisions. But at one time it was refrigerators. Luskin's father, Jack, and uncle, Joe, started the Luskins' home appliance business after World War II by convincing consumers to switch from iceboxes to refrigerators. Jack Luskin eventually expanded into electronics and grew to 60 stores in 21 states with the help of his famous slogan, "The Cheapest Guy in Town.
FEATURES
By Samantha Iacia and For The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2014
Date: July 3 Her story: Pamela Woolford, 47, grew up in Columbia. She is a fiction writer and a former community correspondent for The Baltimore Sun. Her mother, the Rev. Sadie Woolford, lives in Columbia. Her father, Llewellyn Woolford Sr., died in 2012. His story: Gregory Martin, 41, grew up in Middlesex, N.J. He is a music and philosophy teacher at Capital City Public Charter School in Washington, and is also a freelance composer and sound designer. His parents, Mary Ann and Thomas Martin, live in Middlesex.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | September 21, 2014
I'm sorry, I tried to be good and accept life as a small-market CBS sports fan, getting the fourth-string crew and no sideline reporter for Ravens games. And, you have to admit, I managed for a couple weeks to sound like a properly grateful peasant in accepting the crumbs from the table of CBS Sports chairman Sean McManus. Did I not even say in one review that maybe CBS is right, it would be too expensive for the network to have sideline reporters on ALL the Sunday afternoon games - especially in markets like Baltimore?
HEALTH
Scott Dance and The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2014
As health officials fail to contain West Africa's Ebola outbreak, recent scares at two Baltimore-area hospitals highlight the need for hospitals here and across the United States to prepare space and equipment for what some consider inevitable - the arrival of the deadly virus here. While experts say the chances of an epidemic spreading in the U.S. are low, there is a real possibility that someone could come down with Ebola after returning from a trip to Africa, they said. Hospitals routinely ask patients with flu-like symptoms whether they have visited that continent recently.
SPORTS
By Dean Jones Jr. and The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2014
The Orioles recently joined a growing number of teams to institute additional security procedures to prepare for Major League Baseball's requirements at the beginning of next season. While the added measures currently are in effect at some entrances to Camden Yards, MLB has mandated that all 30 ballparks develop a screening program before Opening Day in April. "The safety of our guests is of the utmost importance to the ballclub. As such, the Orioles are cooperating with Major League Baseball's efforts to implement enhanced security measures at all ballparks," Orioles vice president of communications Greg Bader said in a statement.
NEWS
March 2, 1993
Actress Lillian Gish, who died Saturday at age 99, enjoyed a movie career that spanned nearly the entire history of the motion picture industry. She first appeared before the camera in 1909, at the age of 16, in a short film by the pioneering American director D.W. Griffith. Her last movie performance, as an indomitable old woman in "The Whales of August," came in 1987, when she co-starred with another screen legend, Bette Davis.Ms. Gish, whose family lived briefly in Baltimore during the 1890s, was only 5 when she made her acting debut.
FEATURES
September 16, 1991
"Of Flesh and Blood," a dark comedy by UMBC filmmaker Jeff Mentges, will be screened tonight at 7:30 and 9:30 at the Charles Theatre.The film was inspired by the life of pornographic-film star John Holmes, who succumbed to drug addiction and died of AIDS in 1988. Mr. Mentges has described it as "an anti-drug, anti-porno film." It does not contain explicit nudity or sex scenes, but does include profanity and violence.The 25-year-old director made the movie for just $15,000, using non-professional actors and handling much of the production work himself.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2014
I hope those who know Joan Rivers only from her work the last couple of decades on shows like “Fashion Police” will take the time to read some of the appreciations that talk about who she used to be. Rivers, who died Thursday at age 81 after being on life support since Aug. 28, was a fearless, cutting-edge and transgressive comedian straight from Greenwich Village in the 1950s and '60s, who made it possible for the likes of Amy Schumer and...
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | August 25, 2014
Does the president think the world is a TV show? One of the things you learn watching television as a kid is that the hero wins. No matter how dire things look, the star is going to be OK. MacGyver always defuses the bomb with some saltwater taffy before the timer reaches zero. There was no way Fonzie was going to mess up his water-ski jump and get devoured by sharks. Life doesn't actually work like that. That's one reason HBO's "Game of Thrones" is so compelling. Despite being set in an absurd fantasy world of giants, dragons and ice zombies, it's more realistic than a lot of dramas set in a more plausible universe in at least one regard.
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