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NEWS
By Donald G. Vitek | June 28, 1992
Today's column is by the Bowling Gourmet.It's a little-known fact that if you're a bowler, you're food junkie. Has something to do with the sound of bowling balls rumbling down the lanes and the thunder of pins falling in the pits. It's true -- if you bowl, you eat.So how come there has never been a bowlers' guide to better eating? Mostly because bowling center food isn't usually worth thinking about, much less writing about. I mean, there's pizza and beer and there's pizza and beer; how exciting is that?
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | September 12, 2014
Historically, the concept of the diner was fairly straightforward. No-frills food, quick service, huge menu, lots of coffee. In recent years, however, that definition has been expanded and tweaked, as chefs have embraced "upscale" diner food and Guy Fieri roamed the country, shining his "Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives" spotlight on restaurants that don't traditionally fill any of those shoes. The Weekender, a self-billed "country diner," appears to be one of this new breed of restaurant.
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FEATURES
By ROB KASPER and ROB KASPER,SUN COLUMNIST | July 24, 1999
It sits on my plate looking brown and harmless. It is scrapple. But I am not sure I have the courage to eat it.Facing a slab of fried scrapple at the breakfast table is a defining moment. You either love it as many natives of Maryland do. Or you are scared of scrapple, especially if you are a "come here," someone like me who moved to the state.This is especially true when you learn that pig parts are the crucial ingredients in this cornmeal loaf.But I am beginning my final day of eating my way through the Eastern Shore with a brave portion of scrapple and grits.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | June 14, 2008
This week's hot spell made me think of some of the hot-weather culinary customs my family observed. On a brutal Baltimore afternoon in July, my mother would roast a turkey or pork loin in a nonair-conditioned kitchen. She would say, "Don't think about the heat." After all, she'd probably been shopping earlier in the day on Howard Street, on foot, and carrying her shopping bags home. Her mother, my grandmother Lily Rose, who grew up with a wood-fired stove, did not like to light her Oriole gas oven after this time of the year.
NEWS
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | October 13, 2004
Under the supervision of "General" Jerry W. Jones, the men of Union United Methodist Church went to work Saturday, grilling 240 pounds of scrapple slabs for the annual "Apple-Scrapple All-You-Can Eat Breakfast." While the $5.50 meal also included stewed apples, sausage and pancakes, it was the scrapple, of course, that took center stage at the fund-raiser, held as part of the annual Apple-Scrapple Festival in the Eastern Shore town of Bridgeville, Del. "We prefer to call it `square steak,' " Jones said of the rectangular slices cut from the solidified pudding of pork snouts, hearts and other remains mixed with cornmeal or wheat flour that is popular in Delaware, Maryland and southeastern Pennsylvania.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | November 16, 1995
These specialists wear sterilized gloves and dart about in white coats. The floor is frequently flushed with clean water. The overhead bright lights glance off the stainless steel carts.Is this a medical lab? Not at all. The scrapplers are at work.Once a week on the Falls Road in Hampden, two or three workers transform the lowliest scraps of a butchered pig into 500 pounds of solid rectangles of scrapple, the cooked meat pudding so loved -- and often berated -- in parts of Maryland, Pennsylvania and Delaware.
NEWS
December 4, 1994
...XTC Edgar R. Habbersett, 76, president of Habbersett Bros. Inc., an established Philadelphia scrapple and sausage company, died Monday in Lima, Pa. The firm had made scrapple, a breakfast food of pork scraps and cornmeal, for 100 years before incorporating in the 1860s.Jerry Pavletich, 57, the West Coast representative of Trout Unlimited and an ardent defender of Pacific Northwest salmon and steelhead, died in his sleep Thursday in Aberdeen, Wash. President Clinton recently appointed him to be one of two U.S. representatives on the North Pacific Anadromous Fish Commission, made up of representatives from the United States, Japan and Russia.
FEATURES
By JACQUES KELLY | November 23, 2002
I ASSOCIATE November's cranky weather with the arrival of some of the great Maryland foods, our scrapple, sauerkraut, sour beef, buckwheat cakes and fried oysters. Once my grandmother Lily Rose and her sister, Great Aunt Cora, laid down their mops and scrubbing brushes in their annual battle with fall housecleaning, they moved on to the next pleasure. The dishes that issued from their warm and sunny Guilford Avenue kitchen for the next couple of months would make you a fan of these long nights and bone-chilling days.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | June 14, 2008
This week's hot spell made me think of some of the hot-weather culinary customs my family observed. On a brutal Baltimore afternoon in July, my mother would roast a turkey or pork loin in a nonair-conditioned kitchen. She would say, "Don't think about the heat." After all, she'd probably been shopping earlier in the day on Howard Street, on foot, and carrying her shopping bags home. Her mother, my grandmother Lily Rose, who grew up with a wood-fired stove, did not like to light her Oriole gas oven after this time of the year.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | September 4, 1995
What happened? About two weeks ago at the start of my vacation, the roadside vendors were selling cantaloupe and bunches of red zinnias.Come Labor Day weekend, the scene had changed. The temperatures were down 25 degrees from the mid-August highs, and the cantaloupe suddenly looked less interesting. Though just a few days into September, the sides of the Eastern Shore and Delaware roads had mountains of stacked pumpkins the color of orange in an Orioles jersey.There were some surviving zinnias (now growing too tall and lopsided)
FEATURES
By JACQUES KELLY | September 3, 2005
IN THESE EARLY days of September, more than at any time of the year, I think I feel a change move through my life. I notice it in the change of light in the mornings and evenings, but it also has plenty to do with a life spent in Baltimore with relatives who had their own ways of doing things. I've not been home from my vacation for long, but when I left Baltimore three weeks ago, we were in the midst of a humid and draining summer. When I returned, it was clear something else was in the air. I was reminded of vacation arrivals back many years ago, when the old house on Guilford Avenue had been largely shut down, or at least emptied of most of the family for big chunks of June, July and August.
NEWS
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | October 13, 2004
Under the supervision of "General" Jerry W. Jones, the men of Union United Methodist Church went to work Saturday, grilling 240 pounds of scrapple slabs for the annual "Apple-Scrapple All-You-Can Eat Breakfast." While the $5.50 meal also included stewed apples, sausage and pancakes, it was the scrapple, of course, that took center stage at the fund-raiser, held as part of the annual Apple-Scrapple Festival in the Eastern Shore town of Bridgeville, Del. "We prefer to call it `square steak,' " Jones said of the rectangular slices cut from the solidified pudding of pork snouts, hearts and other remains mixed with cornmeal or wheat flour that is popular in Delaware, Maryland and southeastern Pennsylvania.
FEATURES
By JACQUES KELLY | November 23, 2002
I ASSOCIATE November's cranky weather with the arrival of some of the great Maryland foods, our scrapple, sauerkraut, sour beef, buckwheat cakes and fried oysters. Once my grandmother Lily Rose and her sister, Great Aunt Cora, laid down their mops and scrubbing brushes in their annual battle with fall housecleaning, they moved on to the next pleasure. The dishes that issued from their warm and sunny Guilford Avenue kitchen for the next couple of months would make you a fan of these long nights and bone-chilling days.
NEWS
By Maria Blackburn and Maria Blackburn,SUN STAFF | December 17, 2000
Adam Atwell, businessman, stock market investor, peanut-roasting tycoon, surveyed the Pennsylvania Dutch Farmers' Market on a recent Thursday afternoon like a king inspecting his kingdom. This is where, at the age of 10, Adam started roasting and selling brown bags filled with peanuts. This is where Adam, now 17, has spent hundreds of hours in a booth the size of a Volkswagen Jetta, chatting with customers and other vendors about school and current affairs, and making thousands of dollars.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER and ROB KASPER,SUN COLUMNIST | July 24, 1999
It sits on my plate looking brown and harmless. It is scrapple. But I am not sure I have the courage to eat it.Facing a slab of fried scrapple at the breakfast table is a defining moment. You either love it as many natives of Maryland do. Or you are scared of scrapple, especially if you are a "come here," someone like me who moved to the state.This is especially true when you learn that pig parts are the crucial ingredients in this cornmeal loaf.But I am beginning my final day of eating my way through the Eastern Shore with a brave portion of scrapple and grits.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | November 16, 1995
These specialists wear sterilized gloves and dart about in white coats. The floor is frequently flushed with clean water. The overhead bright lights glance off the stainless steel carts.Is this a medical lab? Not at all. The scrapplers are at work.Once a week on the Falls Road in Hampden, two or three workers transform the lowliest scraps of a butchered pig into 500 pounds of solid rectangles of scrapple, the cooked meat pudding so loved -- and often berated -- in parts of Maryland, Pennsylvania and Delaware.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | September 12, 2014
Historically, the concept of the diner was fairly straightforward. No-frills food, quick service, huge menu, lots of coffee. In recent years, however, that definition has been expanded and tweaked, as chefs have embraced "upscale" diner food and Guy Fieri roamed the country, shining his "Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives" spotlight on restaurants that don't traditionally fill any of those shoes. The Weekender, a self-billed "country diner," appears to be one of this new breed of restaurant.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | November 14, 1993
Bruce Aidells rates cities by their sausages.Chicago, he said, is a good sausage town, as is New York. Philadelphia, with its German, Amish, and Italian markets, turns out good sausage, he said. While New Orleans is not much of a sausage town, the andouille sausage made in western Louisiana, he said, is terrific. Los Angeles, he said, is hard to figure. pTC Everybody talks about health foods, yet the town has great hot dogs.And Baltimore? "Oh yeah, Baltimore is a good sausage town."Aidells now lives in San Francisco, where he makes low-fat sausages and writes books.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | September 4, 1995
What happened? About two weeks ago at the start of my vacation, the roadside vendors were selling cantaloupe and bunches of red zinnias.Come Labor Day weekend, the scene had changed. The temperatures were down 25 degrees from the mid-August highs, and the cantaloupe suddenly looked less interesting. Though just a few days into September, the sides of the Eastern Shore and Delaware roads had mountains of stacked pumpkins the color of orange in an Orioles jersey.There were some surviving zinnias (now growing too tall and lopsided)
NEWS
December 4, 1994
...XTC Edgar R. Habbersett, 76, president of Habbersett Bros. Inc., an established Philadelphia scrapple and sausage company, died Monday in Lima, Pa. The firm had made scrapple, a breakfast food of pork scraps and cornmeal, for 100 years before incorporating in the 1860s.Jerry Pavletich, 57, the West Coast representative of Trout Unlimited and an ardent defender of Pacific Northwest salmon and steelhead, died in his sleep Thursday in Aberdeen, Wash. President Clinton recently appointed him to be one of two U.S. representatives on the North Pacific Anadromous Fish Commission, made up of representatives from the United States, Japan and Russia.
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