Advertisement
HomeCollectionsScrap Yard
IN THE NEWS

Scrap Yard

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,Sun Staff Writer | March 6, 1995
A city judge has dismissed a suit brought by Southwest Baltimore neighbors of a noisy automobile scrap yard, ruling that residents filed their suit 51 years too late against the longtime polluter.Last week, Baltimore Circuit Judge Hilary D. Caplan threw out the suit filed in February 1993 by neighbors of United Iron and Metal Co., which operates the 18-acre scrap yard behind the 2600 block of Wilkens Ave. in the Mill Hill community.In dismissing the case before it came to trial, Judge Caplan stated that the time for filing the suit ran out three years after the scrap yard became a nuisance -- in 1939.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | September 2, 2012
Throughout the day, shirtless, tattooed men push shopping carts filled with metal scrap to a junkyard in Curtis Bay. Inside the gate, a pair of German shepherds and 16 surveillance cameras keep watch as the men unload their treasure and leave with cash. Though small and tucked away, the scrap yard on Andard Avenue has prompted an outsized share of outrage. Neighbors complain that the business is encouraging thieves to steal metal from their homes at a time when the market for recycled metal is booming.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,Sun Staff Writer | January 17, 1995
By now, the Southwest Baltimore residents of Mill Hill thought they would be rid of the explosions and the filth from the automobile scrap yard in their back yard.But nearly two years after the United Iron and Metal Co. signed a consent order promising to make changes to reduce air and noise pollution in its yard, little has been done, say neighbors and government officials.Occasional explosions from erupting gas tanks still rock houses and rattle windows.Blue air and pieces of "fluff" from shredded automobile upholstery still float into their yards.
NEWS
November 2, 2009
In Baltimore County, violent crime is down, but incidents of theft are up. What's driven the increase is the lucrative market for scrap metal that has thieves yanking copper pipes out of the walls of vacant apartments and swiping catalytic converters from parked cars with the help of nothing more exotic than a cordless saw. Between 2005 and last year, theft of valuable metal has increased 500 percent in the county, police report. It now represents nearly 2 percent of all the burglary and theft cases investigated by the county police.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | October 1, 2004
Military personnel from Andrews Air Force Base hauled away yesterday a 40- to 50-year-old inert bomb discovered over the weekend in a pile of mangled iron at an East Baltimore scrap yard. The four-foot bomb - which lacked fins, a fuse and explosives - was discovered Sunday as workers at Cambridge Iron and Metal Co. were moving scrap, the facility's owner said. The workers set it aside and called military personnel at Aberdeen Proving Ground on Monday. Inspectors arrived Wednesday at the facility near the 900 block of S. Kresson St. and hauled it away yesterday, said owner Neal Shapiro.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | April 29, 1999
A Frederick County man convicted of stealing $5,000 worth of used tire rims in Carroll County last year received an 18-month jail sentence yesterday.Steven Eugene Grimes, 24, who lives with his ailing mother in Thurmont, could have received up to the maximum sentence of 15 years in prison, given his prior record, said Assistant State's Attorney Brian L. DeLeonardo.But Carroll Circuit Judge Francis M. Arnold decided "to take a chance" on Grimes, and recommended that he be granted work release.
NEWS
By Joe Mathews and Joe Mathews,SUN STAFF | June 8, 1999
Dropping a legal bomb on a small Southwest Baltimore area long accustomed to explosions, a state appeals court has cleared the way for residents to sue a scrap metal yard -- and possibly shifted the balance of power in disputes between communities and their industrial neighbors.The Court of Special Appeals decision, filed Friday by Judge Andrew Sonner, was hailed in tiny Mill Hill, where residents have complained for three decades of explosions, dust, and soot from neighboring United Iron & Metal Co.As word of the decision spread across the city, lawyers and community activists involved in environmental disputes -- from a West Baltimore landfill to a Wagner's Point chemical company -- scrambled for copies.
NEWS
By Zerline A. Hughes and Zerline A. Hughes,SUN STAFF | July 30, 1999
Garden snakes, dead rats and scrap metal have led to the lengthiest jail sentence in Baltimore's history of code enforcement violations for a Park Heights man, authorities say.Alan Verschleisser, who owns Potter's Salvage, could be released today from the Baltimore City Detention Center. He was sentenced to 30 days for civil contempt. Twenty days of the sentence were suspended, but if Verschleisser fails to clean up the scrap yard at his Baker Street property in West Baltimore by Oct. 22, he would serve the rest of the sentence.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | May 11, 2004
Army explosives experts destroyed the 12 bombs found in a ship scrap yard on Baltimore's waterfront and discovered that they were practice weapons full of concrete -- not explosives as authorities had suspected, a military spokeswoman said yesterday. "Usually, the military uses plaster or concrete munitions like this for training purposes," said Pat McClung, a spokeswoman for Aberdeen Proving Ground, where the bombs were buried and then blown open with explosives. The proving ground's High Explosives Team dug up the remnants of the bombs after the demolition Saturday, McClung said.
NEWS
By Melody Simmons and Melody Simmons,SUN STAFF | January 31, 1998
Three Southwest Baltimore families have won $72,775 in damages from United Iron & Metal Co. after they claimed the scrap metal dealer that processes 200 million pounds of steel each year polluted the community, made their children sick and rocked the area with frequent explosions.The damages were awarded this week by a Baltimore Circuit Court jury after a two-week trial before Circuit Judge John Themelis."The explosions were really horrible. The first time we heard it there was a big, loud noise and I though the roof had collapsed," said Mortaza Sholough, who lives in the 900 block of S. Brunswick St., about 75 yards from United Iron & Metal's 18-acre scrap yard at 2545 Wilkens Ave.Sholough and two neighbors filed suit in January last year, claiming that the frequent explosions of vehicle gas tanks being compacted at the plant rocked their houses and caused structural damage.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,peter.hermann@baltsun.com | May 22, 2009
It's not exactly something that grabs your attention as you speed along a busy highway. "You don't even give a tow truck on the side of the road a second glance," said Frank Greene of Sparks. "You say, 'Yep, they're picking up a car.' " You don't think about it until it's your car, and you didn't give permission to have it towed. That's what happened to a 1991 Volkswagen GTI owned by Greene and used by his 21-year-old son Christopher, a student at University of Maryland, Baltimore County who spent countless hours restoring the vehicle and giving it a fresh coat of black paint, only to have the alternator and battery go dead May 4 on the Beltway near Liberty Road.
NEWS
August 16, 2007
Scrap yard fire forces traffic away from tunnel A multiple-alarm fire at a South Baltimore scrap yard last night caused Maryland Transportation Authority Police to divert late-night traffic approaching the Harbor Tunnel for more than an hour onto other routes. Reported at 9:43 p.m., the fire in the Fairfield area sent heavy smoke across a bridge near Frankfurst Avenue south of the Interstate 895 toll plaza, said Cpl. Jonathan Green, a Transportation Authority Police spokesman. Chief Kevin Cartwright, a Fire Department spokesman, said the fire broke out at Baltimore Scrap Yard in the 1600 block of Carbon Ave. and involved a scrap heap more than 40 feet tall.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | October 1, 2004
Military personnel from Andrews Air Force Base hauled away yesterday a 40- to 50-year-old inert bomb discovered over the weekend in a pile of mangled iron at an East Baltimore scrap yard. The four-foot bomb - which lacked fins, a fuse and explosives - was discovered Sunday as workers at Cambridge Iron and Metal Co. were moving scrap, the facility's owner said. The workers set it aside and called military personnel at Aberdeen Proving Ground on Monday. Inspectors arrived Wednesday at the facility near the 900 block of S. Kresson St. and hauled it away yesterday, said owner Neal Shapiro.
NEWS
By Ryan Davis and Ryan Davis,Sun Staff | September 30, 2004
Military personnel from Andrews Air Force Base today hauled away a 40- to 50-year-old inert bomb discovered over the weekend in a pile of mangled iron at an East Baltimore scrap yard. The four-foot bomb which lacked fins, a fuse or explosives was discovered Sunday as workers at Cambridge Iron and Metal Co. were moving scrap, the facility's owner said. The workers set it aside and called military personnel at Aberdeen Proving Ground on Monday. Inspectors arrived Wednesday at the facility near the 900 block of S. Kresson St. and hauled it away today, said owner Neal Shapiro.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | May 11, 2004
Army explosives experts destroyed the 12 bombs found in a ship scrap yard on Baltimore's waterfront and discovered that they were practice weapons full of concrete -- not explosives as authorities had suspected, a military spokeswoman said yesterday. "Usually, the military uses plaster or concrete munitions like this for training purposes," said Pat McClung, a spokeswoman for Aberdeen Proving Ground, where the bombs were buried and then blown open with explosives. The proving ground's High Explosives Team dug up the remnants of the bombs after the demolition Saturday, McClung said.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | May 6, 2004
It was 7:25 a.m. yesterday, under a sunny spring sky, when a construction worker in southern Baltimore started his day by throttling up a backhoe to clear scrap metal from an old shipyard. Using a claw-like device, he clutched and raised what looked like a pipe. But as the dirt tumbled away, he could tell it was something unusual. The man hopped down to take a closer look and discovered it was a bomb, according to Darlene Frank, director of communications for the Maryland Port Administration, which hired the worker.
NEWS
November 2, 2009
In Baltimore County, violent crime is down, but incidents of theft are up. What's driven the increase is the lucrative market for scrap metal that has thieves yanking copper pipes out of the walls of vacant apartments and swiping catalytic converters from parked cars with the help of nothing more exotic than a cordless saw. Between 2005 and last year, theft of valuable metal has increased 500 percent in the county, police report. It now represents nearly 2 percent of all the burglary and theft cases investigated by the county police.
NEWS
By Kim Clark | August 16, 1991
Once every couple of weeks, a sharp explosion rattles the walls of Bill Irwin's office overseeing the junk car shredder at a Baltimore scrap yard.Another air bag has been triggered inside the United Iron & Metal Co. shredding machine that every day grinds 600 cars into scrap metal. The noise scares Mr. Irwin.But scarier still are the air bags that don't explode. If the shredder tears up an air bag without setting it off, the scrap and air could become contaminated with the toxic chemical hidden deep inside the steering column.
NEWS
By David Holley and David Holley,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 31, 2003
MOSCOW - Russian authorities abandoned hope yesterday of finding survivors among seven missing crew members of a nuclear-powered submarine that sank before dawn as it was being towed to a scrap yard. One survivor was plucked from the Barents Sea shortly after the accident, and two bodies were recovered. There is no likelihood of finding additional survivors, Defense Minister Sergei B. Ivanov told reporters after arriving in Severomorsk, the main base of Russia's Northern Fleet. "The sub went to the bottom ... with an open deckhouse," Ivanov said, which meant seawater would have flooded the ship.
NEWS
By Zerline A. Hughes and Zerline A. Hughes,SUN STAFF | July 30, 1999
Garden snakes, dead rats and scrap metal have led to the lengthiest jail sentence in Baltimore's history of code enforcement violations for a Park Heights man, authorities say.Alan Verschleisser, who owns Potter's Salvage, could be released today from the Baltimore City Detention Center. He was sentenced to 30 days for civil contempt. Twenty days of the sentence were suspended, but if Verschleisser fails to clean up the scrap yard at his Baker Street property in West Baltimore by Oct. 22, he would serve the rest of the sentence.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.