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By ROB KASPER | May 14, 1995
"I grew up on TV dinners," Steven Raichlen said with a smile. His late mother, Frances, was a ballerina with the Baltimore Ballet and devoted most of her artistic energy to dancing, not cooking, he said.Nonetheless Raichlen, now the author of award-winning cookbooks, said he has fond memories of his youthful eating adventures in Baltimore.Big family meals, he said, were regularly held at the homes of his two grandmothers, who live a few blocks apart in Baltimore's Mount Washington neighborhood.
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By ROB KASPER | July 22, 2009
I call it cuisine creep: Crab seasoning is spreading beyond crustaceans. It is being used in hamburgers, on crackers, in Bloody Marys. Moreover, it is showing up in communities a long way from saltwater. Various mixtures of salt, peppers, paprika, mustard, celery seed, mace and cardamom have long been a staple of Maryland cooks. Besides coating steamed crabs with it, local cooks have traditionally sprinkled it in the fried chicken batter and on corn on the cob and snacks such as popcorn.
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NEWS
By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,Sun reporter | May 9, 2007
In the morning, we'd much rather take out a Western omelet then spend the time making one at home. We ordered four from local eateries, looking for the best combination of scrambled eggs and chopped green peppers, onions and ham. Here's what we found. BEST BITE Shea's Pancake and Waffle House 215 Back River Neck Road, Essex -- 410-238-4877 Hours --6 a.m.-2 p.m. daily Restaurant's estimate --10 minutes Ready in --7 minutes Here, the large folded omelet, $7.86, was cooked a little too long.
NEWS
By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,Sun reporter | May 9, 2007
In the morning, we'd much rather take out a Western omelet then spend the time making one at home. We ordered four from local eateries, looking for the best combination of scrambled eggs and chopped green peppers, onions and ham. Here's what we found. BEST BITE Shea's Pancake and Waffle House 215 Back River Neck Road, Essex -- 410-238-4877 Hours --6 a.m.-2 p.m. daily Restaurant's estimate --10 minutes Ready in --7 minutes Here, the large folded omelet, $7.86, was cooked a little too long.
FEATURES
By Maria Hiaasen | February 4, 1998
* Item: Red Baron Breakfast Pizza* Servings per package: 2* Cost: About $2.69* Preparation time: 3-5 minutes in microwave or 20 minutes in conventional oven* Review: It's not as convenient as an Egg McMuffin (too messy for commuting), yet this mini breakfast pizza is a hearty option for the morning rush. The sausage scramble flavor features a biscuit-style crust topped with sausage bits, scrambled eggs and Cheddar and mozzarella cheeses. Fat watchers won't be happy (nearly half the calories are from fat)
NEWS
By Jim Sollisch | June 12, 2000
CLEVELAND -- Coming soon to a convenience store near you: scrambled eggs on a stick. Next to which you'll find chili in a cup and macaroni and cheese in a tube. Welcome to the next wave of food technology, portable eatability. The goal is to make it easier to eat while you drive so you can save a few more valuable units of time in your day. Never mind that if we look at everything our moms did to get dinner on the table, we're about three hours ahead already. It's hard to believe that mom prepared our food using knives, egg beaters, rolling pins and other tools from the prehistoric era. Then she cooked it for one hour at 350 degrees.
NEWS
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,Evening Sun Staff | September 19, 1991
Scrambled eggs, applesauce and fried potatoes -- it may not be manna from heaven, but to Esther Reaves, it's close enough.Reaves, the director of Midtown Churches Community Association, had been forced earlier this summer to cut back on the daily breakfasts served at Manna House, a soup kitchen in continuous operation for 18 years in the Barclay area.Over the past year, the number of clients had doubled, pushing the cost of the program to more than $13,000 a month. The non-profit agency, unable to adjust its budget to meet the demand, shut down for most of July and cut back to Thursday through Monday schedule as of Aug. 1.This week, thanks to two volunteers, Manna House was back in operation on Tuesdays and Wednesdays.
NEWS
July 28, 1991
Still suffering from mouth sores, diarrhea and other effects of radiation and chemotherapy, he has been having some good days, the Rev. Bert Benz said Friday from his hospital room at the Markey Cancer Center, University of Kentucky, in Lexington."
FEATURES
By Andrea F. Siegel | July 4, 1992
MILK & HONEY BISTRO 1777 Reisterstown Road. Hours: 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Sundays; 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Mondays through Thursdays; 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Fridays; 2 hours after sundown Saturday to 1:30 a.m. Sunday. (410) 486-4344. If vegetarian fast foods translate to you as paltry meals only a rabbit can appreciate, you haven't been to Milk & Honey.There's no meat to be had here, but you won't miss it. This is a kosher vegetarian, dairy and fish place, serving up as hearty or as light a meal as suits you. Soups, sandwiches, salads, quiches, baked fish, pancakes, spaghetti, macaroni and cheese -- quite a variety.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | July 4, 2003
HURLOCK -- The second-most famous person from this tiny Eastern Shore town is Brandi Helmer, 20, who is currently serving scrambled eggs at the Hurlock Family Restaurant. Brandi is famous not for her scrambled eggs, but for her friendship with Carlton Dotson, with whom she used to go to high school. Everybody in America may get 15 minutes of fame, but in Hurlock, this could be worth a lifetime for Brandi. Already, she has her name in newspapers. She is pursued by reporters from television networks and cable channels.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | October 20, 2005
Harry Calloway, the one-time Baltimore drug dealer who dropped out of the Moveable Feast culinary training class last month and vanished from our radar, is still alive and still clean, and yesterday morning he cooked my breakfast - scrambled eggs, sausage, grits and biscuits - at his new home in Northeast Baltimore. Let the church say amen. Calloway is not in jail - he got out nine days ago - and he hasn't relapsed into old habits. For the first time in about a year, he's neither snorting heroin nor selling it. He's not boosting clothes from shopping malls, either.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | February 29, 2004
At Liberty High School in Eldersburg yesterday, students from across the region scrambled eggs, lost their marbles and tested their physics prowess. With little more than thin paper, masking tape and creativity, about 300 high school students competed in the 12th annual Central Maryland Physics Olympics. They vied for points in six contests -- three they practiced for and three mysteries -- designed by physics teachers to test knowledge, ingenuity and teamwork. "This is time to take what they learn in the classroom and apply it to fun events," said Russ Meyers, physics teacher and football coach at Anne Arundel's Southern High School.
NEWS
By Beverly Levitt and Beverly Levitt,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 13, 2003
It was 6 a.m. on the North Shore of Chicago, and my 2 1/2 -year-old grandson, Levi Max Solomon, was trying to convince his mother he needed to make scrambled eggs. At that very moment. My daughter suggested he sleep a little longer or maybe play with Skarloey, his favorite red push-train. "No, Mommy, scrambled eggs. With cheese." Eventually my daughter relented. Levi cracked the eggs in a bowl, scrambled them, grated cheddar cheese and gathered thyme, basil and chives from the garden for an omelet.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | July 4, 2003
HURLOCK -- The second-most famous person from this tiny Eastern Shore town is Brandi Helmer, 20, who is currently serving scrambled eggs at the Hurlock Family Restaurant. Brandi is famous not for her scrambled eggs, but for her friendship with Carlton Dotson, with whom she used to go to high school. Everybody in America may get 15 minutes of fame, but in Hurlock, this could be worth a lifetime for Brandi. Already, she has her name in newspapers. She is pursued by reporters from television networks and cable channels.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN STAFF | September 18, 2002
You've got your car keys, you've got your briefcase, you've got your ... scrambled eggs in a tube? OK, maybe this isn't the postmillennial breakfast of choice for most people just yet, but the way things are going, it could be. Each year Americans are eating more and more meals behind the wheel. Insurance companies are calling the trend dangerous, and manufacturers are racing to come up with new easy-to-eat foods in tubes, pouches, wraps and cups. Diana Sydnor-Martin, 35, considers herself a typical working mom. She lives in Shrewsbury, Pa., and before she gets to the salon in Baltimore where she's a hairstylist, she has to take two of her children to school and a third to day care.
NEWS
By Jim Sollisch | June 12, 2000
CLEVELAND -- Coming soon to a convenience store near you: scrambled eggs on a stick. Next to which you'll find chili in a cup and macaroni and cheese in a tube. Welcome to the next wave of food technology, portable eatability. The goal is to make it easier to eat while you drive so you can save a few more valuable units of time in your day. Never mind that if we look at everything our moms did to get dinner on the table, we're about three hours ahead already. It's hard to believe that mom prepared our food using knives, egg beaters, rolling pins and other tools from the prehistoric era. Then she cooked it for one hour at 350 degrees.
FEATURES
By Kathy Casey and Kathy Casey,los angeles times syndicate | April 19, 2000
One way to celebrate Eas-ter is with an unhurried breakfast or casual brunch. In some areas it might even be warm enough midday to serve out on the deck. The day is a perfect one to cook some delicious fare and enjoy it with family and friends. Make the occasion more enjoyable by preparing nearly all of the dishes in advance, so you can enjoy the day instead of spending it in the kitchen. The menu should please everybody. Start out with oversize martini glasses filled with Sunshine Fruit drizzled with Ginger-Lime Splash and accompany with warm Almond Scones With Amaretto Butter.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN STAFF | September 18, 2002
You've got your car keys, you've got your briefcase, you've got your ... scrambled eggs in a tube? OK, maybe this isn't the postmillennial breakfast of choice for most people just yet, but the way things are going, it could be. Each year Americans are eating more and more meals behind the wheel. Insurance companies are calling the trend dangerous, and manufacturers are racing to come up with new easy-to-eat foods in tubes, pouches, wraps and cups. Diana Sydnor-Martin, 35, considers herself a typical working mom. She lives in Shrewsbury, Pa., and before she gets to the salon in Baltimore where she's a hairstylist, she has to take two of her children to school and a third to day care.
FEATURES
By Kathy Casey and Kathy Casey,los angeles times syndicate | April 19, 2000
One way to celebrate Eas-ter is with an unhurried breakfast or casual brunch. In some areas it might even be warm enough midday to serve out on the deck. The day is a perfect one to cook some delicious fare and enjoy it with family and friends. Make the occasion more enjoyable by preparing nearly all of the dishes in advance, so you can enjoy the day instead of spending it in the kitchen. The menu should please everybody. Start out with oversize martini glasses filled with Sunshine Fruit drizzled with Ginger-Lime Splash and accompany with warm Almond Scones With Amaretto Butter.
NEWS
By Sam Quinones and Sam Quinones,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 6, 1999
MEXICO CITY -- One image best symbolizes tomorrow's historic presidential primary by Mexico's ruling party.It is the private parts of Roberto Madrazo.Madrazo, the former governor of the state of Tabasco, is seeking the nomination of the ruling Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI). During his campaign, he ran a television spot about crime. He told Mexico: "You solve the problem with you know what."He was referring to "huevos" -- eggs, slang for testicles. "To have huevos" is a common Mexican expression denoting a person's unflinching nerve.
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