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NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,Sun Staff Writer | April 22, 1995
The parents of a Parkville Boy Scout who drowned on a canoe trip on Deer Creek in Harford County are suing the Baltimore Area Council of the Boys Scouts of America and five troop leaders for $5 million, alleging negligence in the death.Mary Catherine and Jeffrey Sappington, parents of Justin Michael Sappington, filed the lawsuit Tuesday in Baltimore Circuit Court.Scout leaders named as defendants are Paul DeSimone, Gene O. Fisher and Mark Evan Garrett, all of Parkville; Michael John Huneke of Forest Hill, and James Arthur Bowen of Glenarm.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | December 11, 2013
Sarah W. McCardell, a Govans homemaker who happily cared for her 10 children while teaching them lasting values and enduring life lessons that she imparted with love, humor and grace, died Friday of a stroke at the University of Maryland St. Joseph Medical Center. She was 89. "My mother was a wonderful person, and I feel it was fortunate that we had my parents living with us. She was not just my mother, but one of my best friends," said a daughter, Margaret Ellen Clemmens of Stoneleigh.
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FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,Evening Sun Staff | January 22, 1991
MANY BOY Scouts and Cub Scouts are writing letters and sending gifts to soldiers in the Persian Gulf because of the volunteer work and time Susan Newell and her husband, Jim, of Arbutus, spent in compiling information to help them.Susan is pack leader of Cub Scout Troop 307 at Catonsville Methodist Church and is a legal secretary for the law firm of Whiteford, Taylor and Preston. Jim is a unit commissioner in the Boy Scouts and is chairman for the Explorer Scouts of the National Pike District.
NEWS
February 5, 2013
The leaders of the Boy Scouts of America are expected to vote tomorrow on whether to scrap the organization's long-standing national ban on admitting gay Scouts and Scout leaders, and to replace it with a policy that allows the religious and civic organizations that sponsor individual Scout units to set their own rules on the issue. The ban on gay Scouts is an anachronism that flies in the face of the overdue societal trend toward greater inclusiveness, tolerance and acceptance of diversity.
BUSINESS
By LESTER A. PICKER | August 26, 1991
This column is bound to upset some people, so let me set the record straight immediately. I don't give one hoot what a person's sexual preferences are, whether heterosexual, homosexual, bisexual or asexual.Now for some background on an important issue. The Boy Scouts of America is under intense pressure in the San Francisco Bay area to allow gay men to serve as Scout leaders. Having been defeated in the courts, gay activists are trying a new strategy: forcing their position on the local Scout Council by threatening the loss of United Way funds.
EXPLORE
September 11, 2012
Teachers, home school leaders, Scout leaders, parents and group leaders can learn about educational opportunities in Laurel at an Educators Open House, Thursday, Sept. 27, from 3 to 7:30 p.m., at the Laurel Museum, 817 Main St. This is a chance to meet representatives from community resources such as local museums, including Montpelier mansion; theaters; libraries; and other non-profits and to learn how they serve educational groups. There will be door and raffle prizes, gift bags, refreshments and adult beverages and tours of the Laurel Museum.
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,SUN STAFF | June 11, 2000
District Boy Scout leaders are hiking a virtual extra mile this year to educate nearly 3,000 members of 75 troops and packs in Carroll County about the dangers and harmful effects of drug abuse. Not only have Carroll Scouts joined "Drugs: A Deadly Game," a Boy Scouts program launched in 1994, but local Scout leaders have sought additional resources to complement the national program's message. Junction Inc., a Westminster-based substance-abuse treatment and prevention center, helped the Scouts obtain a $600 grant to purchase a drug abuse and paraphernalia display box, said Rhonda Zile, who leads the drug awareness program for Scouting in the Carroll district.
NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,Staff Writer | February 15, 1993
Jeffrey A. Glover learned the responsibility attached to earning the rank of Eagle Scout yesterday."The rank of Eagle Scout is loaned, not given," said Baltimore area Boy Scout representative Robert Scarsborough, as Mr. Glover, an Eldersburg resident, received the honor few Scouts achieve. "You must earn it each day. To those that wear this little bit of cloth and metal, it is a badge of honor."For Mr. Glover, that little bit of cloth and metal represents eight years of Boy Scout membership, 21 merit badges and a position as senior patrol leader in Troop 417."
NEWS
By Rasmi Simhan and Rasmi Simhan,SUN STAFF | December 29, 1998
The boy on the playground near Rutland Avenue in East Baltimore saw one man chasing another down the street with a gun. The grade-schooler dropped from the monkey bars and lay flat on the ground. When the men had passed, the boy ran for cover. Shots rang out.In addition to building birdhouses and learning how to build campfires, the youngster had been trained to dodge the cross fire of urban warfare at a Boy Scouts meeting two weeks earlier.Finding volunteers to tailor life-enhancing lessons to suit the realities of the inner city is an unending task for the Baltimore Council of Boy Scouts of America.
NEWS
By Joni Guhne and Joni Guhne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 3, 1998
THELMA MAY BE ONE OF the least likely names you'd expect to belong to the scoutmaster of a Boy Scout troop.But Thelma Furlong, the first female scoutmaster in the Scouts' Capital District, is part of a new breed of Scout leaders.Besides Furlong, whose district includes the southern and western parts of Anne Arundel County, the state has no more than five female scoutmasters.Granted, there have always been women Cub pack leaders. That's how Furlong started her Boy Scout career.But, when it comes to teaching the rugged, big-guy stuff, the role is traditionally left to men."
EXPLORE
September 11, 2012
Teachers, home school leaders, Scout leaders, parents and group leaders can learn about educational opportunities in Laurel at an Educators Open House, Thursday, Sept. 27, from 3 to 7:30 p.m., at the Laurel Museum, 817 Main St. This is a chance to meet representatives from community resources such as local museums, including Montpelier mansion; theaters; libraries; and other non-profits and to learn how they serve educational groups. There will be door and raffle prizes, gift bags, refreshments and adult beverages and tours of the Laurel Museum.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 23, 2012
Helen C. Roe, a retired secretary and Girl Scout leader, died Jan. 17 of complications from a stroke at her Severna Park home. She was 77. Helen C. Skelton was born in Baltimore and raised in Bolton Hill and on Eutaw Place and Chilton Street. She graduated in 1952 from Eastern High School. From 1980 until retiring in the late 1990s, Mrs. Skelton had been a secretary for the Anne Arundel County Department of Health, working at a clinic at Northeast High School. The longtime Severna Park resident had been a Girl Scout leader for more than 12 years.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 6, 2010
Sadie G. Curtis, a homemaker and longtime Anne Arundel County resident, died April 28 from complications of Alzheimer's disease at Household of Angels, a Severna Park assisted-living facility. She was 78. Sadie Garrett, the daughter of a Swarthmore College professor and a homemaker, was born and raised in Swarthmore, Pa. After graduating in 1948 from Swarthmore High School, she earned a bachelor's degree in chemistry in 1952 from Oberlin College, and two years later, a master's degree in chemistry from Purdue University.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | June 22, 2009
Christina L. Fitch, a homemaker who was active in Boy Scouting, died Friday of pancreatic cancer at her Parkville home. She was 47. Christina Lee Boles was born in Baltimore and raised in Lansdowne. She was a 1979 graduate of Lansdowne High School. In 1979, she married David W. Fitch Sr., who owns a vending machine company, and settled in Parkville where she raised her three sons. "Her primary interest and hobby was raising her children. She was completely devoted to them, and working with the Scouts," said her brother, Carl Randolph, an actor, who lives in Laurel.
NEWS
By Josh Mitchell and Josh Mitchell,Sun Reporter | November 24, 2006
Dr. Benjamin L. "Doc" Harris, a former chemical engineer who retired as the director of research and development at Edgewood Arsenal, died Saturday of complications from Alzheimer's disease at the Glen Meadows retirement community in Glen Arm. He was 89 and a longtime resident of Glen Arm. He was born in Savannah, Ga., and moved to the Baltimore area with his parents as a child. He joined the Army as an officer in 1938, performing chemical research at Edgewood for five years during World War II. He was a reserve officer until 1977, when he retired as a colonel.
NEWS
October 11, 2006
John Jay Rush Sr., a retired salesman honored for his many years in Boy Scouts, died yesterday of complications from a stroke at the Continuum Care Nursing Home in Sykesville. The Westminster resident was 81. Born in Trenton, N.J., he became active in the Boy Scouts of America when he joined a troop in 1937 at age 12. His affiliation with Scouting lasted 66 years. After service in the Army Air Forces during World War II in France, he earned a bachelor's degree in business administration from Temple University in Philadelphia.
NEWS
By Compiled from the archives of the Historical Society of Carroll County | March 15, 1998
25 years ago: With seven ringing cheers and full tummies, 70 Girl Scouts of the Taneytown area joined the Royal Order of Hobos Monday night. The occasion was a hobo party planned by the Scout leaders and girls of Brownie Troop 171, Junior Troop 657 and Cadette Troop 31 to celebrate National Girl Scout Week and the organization's 61st birthday. Dressed in an array of disreputable clothes, which these days wouldn't warrant a second glance, the budding flowers of Taneytown's femininity had a fun-filled time in the social room of Grace United Church of Christ.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | April 4, 2005
Peter A. McCabe, a retired federal advocate for the disabled who was active in Howard County Scouting and the rescue of people lost in the wilderness, died of congestive heart failure Thursday at Johns Hopkins Hospital. The Columbia resident was 68. Born in La Crosse, Wis., he served in the Army in Korea before earning a bachelor of arts degree from Western Michigan University in Kalamazoo. "Peter had a speech impediment, a stutter, and in his early days he was afraid to speak in public," said his wife of 45 years, the former Nancie Elizabeth Marsh.
NEWS
March 20, 2005
Douglas Russell Williams, a retired occupational therapist and Boy Scout leader, died of complications from a stroke March 12 at the Presbyterian Home of Maryland in Towson. He was 96. Mr. Williams was born and raised in the city's Howard Park neighborhood. He left school to help support his family and later earned a General Educational Development diploma. During World War II, he was a deck-fitting foreman at Bethlehem Steel Corp's Fairfield shipyard. Mr. Williams, who had lived in Towson and Washington, had worked as an occupational therapist at St. Elizabeths Hospital in the District of Columbia for more than 15 years before retiring in the early 1970s.
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