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NEWS
July 30, 1991
From the time most of us left work last Friday afternoon until we returned Monday morning, five more people were killed in Baltimore. This came on the heels of the shooting of 9-year-old Lakiya Bradford, who was hit as she walked toward a snow ball stand in East Baltimore. Just a week earlier, 6-year-old Tiffany Smith was killed in the cross fire of an apparent drug shootout while she played on the sidewalk in front of a friend's house.Tragically, killing has become so routine in this city that it has integrated itself into the very fabric of urban life.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 10, 2013
Donna St. George reports in The Washington Post that the Montgomery County Public Schools have decided to address a serious hindrance to the education of students in that county: strawberry milk. In a move that seems to defy logic, the county has decided to take away strawberry milk:  Come January, school cafeterias in Montgomery County will be missing the pinkest offering of the lunch line. Strawberry-flavored milk is on its way out. St. George reports: "The drink is not as popular as chocolate milk and not as nutritious as plain milk, officials say. So at a time of growing concern about healthy foods for children, the pink milk has lost its place on refrigerated shelves in Maryland's largest school system.
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NEWS
By DAN BERGER | December 17, 1990
Bill Bennett fixed education and went on to defeat the drug scourge and quit that to restore the Republican Party and now can move on to other things.No more hostages in Iraq! Unless you want to count 18 million Iraqis as hostages.Note to angels of mercy: It is still against the law to assist the suicides of people who absent-mindedly forgot to leave good evidence of their intent.Strike a blow at Saddam's plot to depress our economy: Buy extravagantly for Christmas.
NEWS
By John McCarthy and Tom Manger | October 8, 2013
Earlier this year, the General Assembly passed legislation to deal with the serious problem of an emerging class of drugs known as "synthetic cannabinoids. " The new law, which went into effect Oct. 1, prohibits the sale and possession of drugs intended to mimic the effects of marijuana, commonly sold under brand names such as "K-2," "Spice," "Voodoo Spice" "Scooby Snax," "Mr. Nice Guy" and "Mystery," to name just a few. Particularly troubling is that the packaging of these products often depict cartoon characters or images that are appealing to young people.
NEWS
January 22, 2013
Like many Americans, for years I wanted to believe Lance Armstrong. He had the aura of a hero, a testicular cancer survivor's story and seven consecutive Tour de France victories ("Armstrong lays out story of his doping," Jan. 18). In hindsight, the scenario was too perfect. For so long, we truly wanted to believe while not allowing our minds to ponder the unthinkable. At one time, Armstrong walked on rarefied air. He was an international megastar, and he was one of our own. That same air is suddenly rife with the stench of a cheat, a liar and a scourge of the masses who once revered him. Patrick R. Lynch, Nottingham
NEWS
March 9, 2011
Regarding your editorial "A flawed compromise on illegal immigrant tuition" (March 8), the initial premise of your argument — that we should be educating the children of illegal aliens — is ridiculous. Since these kids are here illegally, why are we letting them into our K-12 schools in the first place? According to you, we already are spending $200,000 per kid to get these undocumented students from elementary school through high school. That money could be better spent on the law-abiding legal residents of Maryland.
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | September 14, 1997
To some, H. L. Mencken is Baltimore's sage -- his hyperbolic biting criticism are the words of pure truth. To others, he is Baltimore's scourge -- an anti-Semitic bigot and woman hater.But Mencken really was an artist who had a love for words and a magical way of crafting them, Paul Fussell, award-winning author and University of Pennsylvania professor, told a packed room of Mencken lovers at the revered writer's 117th birthday anniversary celebration yesterday at the Enoch Pratt Free Library on Cathedral Street.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | November 1, 1993
LOS ANGELES -- With the worst wildfires in recent history quickly burning into memory, many Southern Californians were looking toward a long and daunting recovery, and worrying about the mudslides that are almost certain to come.Most of the 14 fires that had burned across six counties over the last week were under control yesterday or on the verge of being encircled by firefighters, with no homes remaining in immediate danger.The Laguna Beach fire, the most devastating of the blazes, was nearly extinguished by last night.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 6, 2005
Local officials from across the country declared yesterday that methamphetamine is the nation's leading law-enforcement scourge - a more insidious drug problem than cocaine - blaming it for crowding jails and fueling increases in theft and violence, as well as a host of social welfare problems. Officials from the National Association of Counties, releasing results from a survey of 500 local officials nationwide, argued that Washington's focus on terrorism and homeland security had diverted money and attention from the methamphetamine problem in the United States.
NEWS
By Molly Ivins | July 9, 2002
AUSTIN, Texas - Our personal trainer the president, up and running after his colonoscopy (I did not need to know about that), is trying out a new role - Scourge of Corporate Misbehavior. "Hard to believe" barely begins to hint at the surrealism of this development. The Bush people are going to force us to take this nonsense seriously. I guarantee we will soon be hearing about the Pepster's long-cherished populist beliefs. Ever since the man told us he was the Father of the Texas Patients' Bill of Rights (which he first vetoed and then refused to sign)
NEWS
By Deborah Agus | August 14, 2013
It is mid-morning on a recent Friday in West Baltimore, and there is a long line snaking down the street and around the corner. Why? Vendors are dispensing free heroin samples. In other areas of the city, buyers are risking arrest and drug contamination to illegally purchase buprenorphine. It is legal medication when given with a prescription. It is used to treat opioid addiction and facilitate recovery. So why buy it illegally? Not to get high as a substitute for heroin. They are using it to treat their heroin addiction.
NEWS
By Carolyn Woo | April 25, 2013
Malaria is an enormous and tragic problem - that can be beat. It takes the life of a child every minute in Sub-Saharan Africa, and a million people die from malaria each year. It also stifles economic development, as malaria prevents children from attending school and adults from working. Today is World Malaria Day, and I am pleased to celebrate the lives saved and enriched by recent attention and investments. Not that many years ago, this would be an occasion for hand-wringing and lamenting the many victims of this disease and wishing we could get the world to do more.
NEWS
January 22, 2013
Like many Americans, for years I wanted to believe Lance Armstrong. He had the aura of a hero, a testicular cancer survivor's story and seven consecutive Tour de France victories ("Armstrong lays out story of his doping," Jan. 18). In hindsight, the scenario was too perfect. For so long, we truly wanted to believe while not allowing our minds to ponder the unthinkable. At one time, Armstrong walked on rarefied air. He was an international megastar, and he was one of our own. That same air is suddenly rife with the stench of a cheat, a liar and a scourge of the masses who once revered him. Patrick R. Lynch, Nottingham
NEWS
By Beth Happick and Jeanne Allert | August 16, 2011
"Melissa," one of the girls we've encountered in street outreach in Baltimore, is originally from Baltimore County. As a child, she loved fairies and wanted to be a dancer. After her parents' divorce, she experimented with drugs, which opened her up to a world of darkness she could not have imagined. Vulnerable and looking for her own identity, she was soon approached by a "boyfriend" who promised to care for her, but he was actually a trafficker who fueled her habit and sold her for sex up and down the I-95 corridor, profiting from the abuse of her body by those who would pay the price.
NEWS
By Yngvild Olsen | June 30, 2011
Baltimore City has long held the unfortunate title of "U.S. heroin capital. " Over the years, many people inside and outside of Baltimore have chosen to promulgate this unofficial designation when reporting on or portraying Baltimore's challenges with drugs, addiction and the residual effects of high crime, violence and other social ills. Baltimore, like many urban jurisdictions across the country, has suffered and continues to suffer tremendously from the consequences of illegal drugs flowing into our city.
NEWS
March 9, 2011
Regarding your editorial "A flawed compromise on illegal immigrant tuition" (March 8), the initial premise of your argument — that we should be educating the children of illegal aliens — is ridiculous. Since these kids are here illegally, why are we letting them into our K-12 schools in the first place? According to you, we already are spending $200,000 per kid to get these undocumented students from elementary school through high school. That money could be better spent on the law-abiding legal residents of Maryland.
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD | October 17, 2007
I am standing in the checkout line at the supermarket with a can of tuna - one little can of Bumblebee, that's all - when they draft me into the war on cancer. It starts when the guy ahead of me asks the cashier: "What's with the pink signs and balloons?" "We're collecting to fight breast cancer," she answers in a voice that can be heard in New Hampshire. She points to a big, plastic jug filled with bills and coins and adds: "Over there, if you'd like to contribute." Oh, yes, this guy would like to help.
NEWS
October 1, 2002
NOW WE KNOW WHY. We know why parts of Baltimore seem a lot like Dodge City, a lawless and uncivil town where criminals and mayhem -- not law and order -- rule the streets. We know why the culture of violence here seems nurtured, rather than bludgeoned, by the system created to keep it in check. We know why thugs in this city kill over and over again, why they indulge in unspeakable brutality and why they fear no authority's attempts to stop them. It's because they can get away with it. If New York is known for Broadway, and Los Angeles is famous for Hollywood, Baltimore's claim to notoriety has been an unending cycle of murderous violence.
NEWS
By Renee Ellen Fox, Wendy Lane and Bronwyn Mayden | August 2, 2010
Although the infant mortality rate in Maryland showed a promising decline in 2009, there is little cause for celebration in Baltimore City. In contrast to much of the rest of the state, its infant mortality rate (deaths in children less than 1 year old per 1,000 live births) increased from 12.2 in 2008 to 13.5 in 2009. While the mortality rate among white infants in Baltimore dropped slightly, the mortality rate in black children rose to a shocking rate of 15.8 per 1,000 live births, a rate higher than that of many third world countries.
NEWS
By Ken Hackett | October 18, 2009
September saw the passing of Norman Borlaug, the father of the Green Revolution that lifted millions of people out of hunger through the production of high-yield varieties of wheat. In the four decades since he began his work, we have made significant progress in the fight against global hunger. Thanks in no small part to U.S. foreign assistance and the generosity of American citizens, the percentage of chronically hungry people declined from 37 percent of the world's population in the 1960s to about 13 percent today.
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