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By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Sun architecture critic | September 12, 2007
Baltimore's preservation commission recommended yesterday that the Scottish Rite Temple of Freemasonry be added to the city's landmark list - the second month in a row the panel voted to protect a major building on Charles Street from demolition or alteration, even though its owners object to the designation. The panel voted unanimously yesterday to add the Scottish Rite Temple to the landmarks list after hearing testimony from residents of the surrounding area and others - including at least one Mason - that the neoclassical building at 3800 N. Charles St. deserved landmark status.
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FEATURES
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | March 10, 2008
One year after local preservationists and community leaders voiced concerns that Baltimore's Scottish Rite Temple of Freemasonry might be demolished to make way for new development, the building no longer appears threatened by the wrecker's ball. It's not completely off the endangered list, either. Leaders of the Masonic order that owns the neoClassical building at 3800 N. Charles St. have decided for now to stay at their current location rather than pursue a plan to sell the property and use the money to move to Baltimore County, according to representative Ray Leppo.
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NEWS
September 15, 2006
On September 14, 2006 Ebert Lauron Heffner, Sr. Beloved husband of the late Cleo B. Heffner and Devoted Father of Sonja Heffner Dean and her husband Frank and also Beloved Father of Ebert Lauron Heffner, Jr. Loving Grandfather of Sharon Dean Boxall, F. Steven Dean, Julie Heffner, Kevin Heffner, Mark Heffner,and Scott Heffner. Great Grandfather of Sonja, Thomas, Holly, Emily, Cory, Brent, Caroline, Katelyn and Abby. Mr. Heffner was an active member of Ionic Lodge, Scottish Rite, and Boumi Temple Shrine.
FEATURES
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Sun architecture critic | September 17, 2007
Twice this summer, Baltimore's preservation commission voted to recommend adding a building to the city's landmark list, despite objections from owners who didn't want that building to be designated a landmark. In both cases, the outcome was the same: The nomination was approved, and the building received the protection the panel wanted. But the difference in tone between the two sessions was as different as night and day. At the first meeting, involving the 40-year-old Morris A. Mechanic Theatre, the owners enlisted speaker after speaker to explain why they didn't think the downtown building should be named a landmark.
NEWS
June 10, 2007
Soup kitchen gets new home Our Daily Bread moved from its Cathedral Street location to a new $15 million, 52,000-square-foot facility in the shadow of the city's jail by the Jones Falls Expressway. Work paid, but undone Spot checks by state inspectors found that Baltimore school employees falsely reported making promised building repairs and permitted shoddy work on renovations. A day later, Mayor Sheila Dixon ordered an audit of the program. Wrong apartment raided Annapolis police officers attempting to execute a search warrant broke down the door of the wrong apartment, an incident that the police are investigating.
NEWS
February 20, 2003
On February 17, 2003, MAURICE THORNE, of Westminster; husband of the late Ida Evelyn Evans; father of Gary Lee Evans; brother of Henry Evans; grandfather of I. Jean Dougherty and Mark G. Evans. Also survived by two great-grandchildren. He was a loyal member of Adherence lodge #88, A.F. & A.M. and the Boumi Temple, and was a 32nd Degree member of the Scottish Rite. A memorial service will be held at a later date. Memorial contributions may be made to the Maryland Masonic Home Endowment Fund, 300 International Circle, Cockeysville, MD 21030.
FEATURES
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Sun architecture critic | September 17, 2007
Twice this summer, Baltimore's preservation commission voted to recommend adding a building to the city's landmark list, despite objections from owners who didn't want that building to be designated a landmark. In both cases, the outcome was the same: The nomination was approved, and the building received the protection the panel wanted. But the difference in tone between the two sessions was as different as night and day. At the first meeting, involving the 40-year-old Morris A. Mechanic Theatre, the owners enlisted speaker after speaker to explain why they didn't think the downtown building should be named a landmark.
NEWS
By Rosalie Falter and Rosalie Falter,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 18, 1997
IT WAS MY PLEASURE TO attend the 1997 Music Scholarship Awards, presented Tuesday by the Notables and the Scottish Rite Singers at the Linthicum Heights United Methodist Church. Music students from Anne Arundel Community College and Towson State University performed to a full house in the church's Fellowship Hall.Matthew Jeffrey, a 12-year-old George Fox Middle School student who studies piano with Reynaldo Reyes at Towson State, was on the program with the college students.Towson State students Benjamin D. Cowan, guitar, and Didier Prossaird, piano, performed a duet.
NEWS
April 19, 1991
Services for Edward J. Klauenberg, retired executive vice president of a steel fabricating company, will be held at 9:30 a.m. tomorrow at Epiphany Lutheran Church, Raspe and Marluth avenues.Mr. Klauenberg, who was 84 and lived on Martingale Road in Lutherville, died Wednesday at St. Joseph Hospital after an illness of several months.He retired in 1972 from Dietrich Brothers, which he had joined at age 14 as an office boy.The Baltimore native was a graduate of the old Maryland Institute on Market Place and studied engineering through night classes and correspondence courses.
NEWS
December 18, 1990
Charles R. Foell, retired plant engineer for the Continental Can Co., who had also worked at a family-owned butcher's stall in Lexington Market, died Nov. 24 at St. Agnes Hospital after a heart attack.Mr. Foell, who was 86 and lived in the Overbrook Apartments in Catonsville, worked for the can company for about 40 years before retiring from its East Biddle Street plant about 20 years ago.For many years he also worked at Foell Brothers Inc., the meat stall started by his father.Born in Baltimore, he graduated from the Polytechnic Institute and earned an engineering degree at the Johns Hopkins University.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Sun architecture critic | September 12, 2007
Baltimore's preservation commission recommended yesterday that the Scottish Rite Temple of Freemasonry be added to the city's landmark list - the second month in a row the panel voted to protect a major building on Charles Street from demolition or alteration, even though its owners object to the designation. The panel voted unanimously yesterday to add the Scottish Rite Temple to the landmarks list after hearing testimony from residents of the surrounding area and others - including at least one Mason - that the neoclassical building at 3800 N. Charles St. deserved landmark status.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,Sun reporter | July 18, 2007
Saying that historic properties give Baltimore's business district character, the Downtown Partnership is calling for the city to offer more incentives to owners to protect their buildings from demolition and to start talks about landmark status earlier, according to the nonprofit corporation's report released yesterday. The study, commissioned last year with financial support from the Abell Foundation, offers preliminary suggestions to guide elected leaders, planning officials and preservation activists.
NEWS
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,sun reporter | July 12, 2007
Baltimore's Commission for Historical and Architectural Preservation has voted to grant landmark protection to four sites, including a noted African-American church, a South Baltimore park that had a role in the War of 1812 and a distinctive old brewery. The preservation panel, however, has delayed action on the most controversial item on its agenda -- landmarking the Scottish Rite Temple of Freemasonry against the wishes of the Masonic organization that owns the North Baltimore building.
NEWS
June 10, 2007
Soup kitchen gets new home Our Daily Bread moved from its Cathedral Street location to a new $15 million, 52,000-square-foot facility in the shadow of the city's jail by the Jones Falls Expressway. Work paid, but undone Spot checks by state inspectors found that Baltimore school employees falsely reported making promised building repairs and permitted shoddy work on renovations. A day later, Mayor Sheila Dixon ordered an audit of the program. Wrong apartment raided Annapolis police officers attempting to execute a search warrant broke down the door of the wrong apartment, an incident that the police are investigating.
NEWS
June 4, 2007
SPORTS Angels beat O's on walkoff Vladimir Guerrero pounded Chris Ray's final pitch over the wall in left-center field for the game-winning, two-run home run, giving the Los Angeles Angels a 4-3 victory over the visiting Orioles. pg 1d MARYLAND Stabbing suspect released earlier The man charged with stabbing and robbing a woman in Charles Village recently was accused of attacking a shoe store manager four years ago but was released after being found not criminally responsible because of a mental disorder, court records show.
FEATURES
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,sun architecture critic | June 4, 2007
When it opened in 1933, the Scottish Rite Temple of Freemasonry featured a banquet hall that could accommodate 665 people for dinner and dancing. Its bronze front doors were 28 feet high and weighed 3 tons each. Later came a 1,065-seat auditorium with one of the largest stages between New York and Washington. But after nearly 75 years, the charitable foundation that owns the building at Charles and 39th streets wants to sell it and move to smaller quarters in Baltimore County. A representative of the Scottish Rite Charitable Foundation, the owner, recently confirmed at a Tuscany-Canterbury Neighborhood Association meeting that his group is starting to look for a buyer for the property -- 2 1/2 acres in all. "I won't deny ... that we are considering selling it," said Marlin Mills, assistant personal representative to the Masonic order's sovereign grand inspector general.
NEWS
April 6, 2003
Dr. Bernard E. Rothman, a retired Silver Spring optometrist who was active in Masonic affairs, died of congestive heart failure Monday at Shady Grove Adventist Hospital in Rockville. He was 81 and lived in Silver Spring. Dr. Rothman was born in Baltimore and reared on Ellamont Street. After graduating in 1938 from Forest Park High School, he studied optometry at the Pennsylvania College of Optometry in Elkins Park. He graduated in 1942. He enlisted that year in the Army and served as an optometrist in France and England.
FEATURES
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,sun architecture critic | June 4, 2007
When it opened in 1933, the Scottish Rite Temple of Freemasonry featured a banquet hall that could accommodate 665 people for dinner and dancing. Its bronze front doors were 28 feet high and weighed 3 tons each. Later came a 1,065-seat auditorium with one of the largest stages between New York and Washington. But after nearly 75 years, the charitable foundation that owns the building at Charles and 39th streets wants to sell it and move to smaller quarters in Baltimore County. A representative of the Scottish Rite Charitable Foundation, the owner, recently confirmed at a Tuscany-Canterbury Neighborhood Association meeting that his group is starting to look for a buyer for the property -- 2 1/2 acres in all. "I won't deny ... that we are considering selling it," said Marlin Mills, assistant personal representative to the Masonic order's sovereign grand inspector general.
NEWS
By JANET GILBERT | January 12, 2007
In five minutes on the Internet, you can find all of the Masons' passwords and secrets," said Brent Morris. "But I'm not going to tell you. It's a matter of honor."
NEWS
September 15, 2006
On September 14, 2006 Ebert Lauron Heffner, Sr. Beloved husband of the late Cleo B. Heffner and Devoted Father of Sonja Heffner Dean and her husband Frank and also Beloved Father of Ebert Lauron Heffner, Jr. Loving Grandfather of Sharon Dean Boxall, F. Steven Dean, Julie Heffner, Kevin Heffner, Mark Heffner,and Scott Heffner. Great Grandfather of Sonja, Thomas, Holly, Emily, Cory, Brent, Caroline, Katelyn and Abby. Mr. Heffner was an active member of Ionic Lodge, Scottish Rite, and Boumi Temple Shrine.
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