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TRAVEL
By June Sawyers, Tribune Newspapers | November 22, 2009
'Cycling Britain' Lonely Planet, $24.99 This thorough guide covers cycling in all parts of Britain, in all terrain and under all weather conditions. It describes cycling in big cities (such as York - "kindest on the cyclists"); along historical trails, including the Roman remains of Hadrian's Wall; and along what the authors call "adrenaline pumpers," from England's northern Pennine range to the mountains of the Scottish Highlands. Those who want a truly urban experience can try London (less adventurous souls might want to consider the Westminster & the City ride on Sundays, when two of the city's major roads are closed to cars)
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Jordan Bartel, assistant editor, b | February 17, 2013
If you're a big fan, you already knew what was coming in the season finale. But it didn't make it any easier -- or less heartbreaking -- to watch. The majority of the Season 3 "Downton" finale, or the "Christmas special" as its called in the U.K., took place in Scotland, where the whole family (minus Branson) visits the Highlands home of the Dowager's niece, Susan, and her husband, Shrimpy. Most of the trip included bagpipes, hunting, more bagpipes and Scottish reel dancing. But more on that later (and more on O'Brien meeting her Scottish lady's maid doppelganger)
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TRAVEL
July 10, 2005
Heights of Scotland Rugged scenery attracts royals, commoners alike You don't have to be royal to enjoy a majestic time in the Scottish Highlands near Balmoral, the sweeping estate where Prince Charles and Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall, spent their recent honeymoon. All you need is an appetite for healthy outdoor pursuits and enough time to appreciate the beautiful scenery of purple heather-clad glens, rich pine woods and flowing rivers. Anyone in a rush risks being frustrated by the twisty, narrow Highland roads that can turn a trip of several dozen miles into a long drive, albeit one the traveler is unlikely to forget -- not least because of the locals' alarmingly fast driving.
TRAVEL
By June Sawyers, Tribune Newspapers | November 22, 2009
'Cycling Britain' Lonely Planet, $24.99 This thorough guide covers cycling in all parts of Britain, in all terrain and under all weather conditions. It describes cycling in big cities (such as York - "kindest on the cyclists"); along historical trails, including the Roman remains of Hadrian's Wall; and along what the authors call "adrenaline pumpers," from England's northern Pennine range to the mountains of the Scottish Highlands. Those who want a truly urban experience can try London (less adventurous souls might want to consider the Westminster & the City ride on Sundays, when two of the city's major roads are closed to cars)
TRAVEL
By Alec MacGillis and Alec MacGillis,Sun Staff | March 2, 2003
In Nova Scotia, even the best-oriented travelers will encounter moments where they completely lose their bearings. After all, where else on the Eastern Seaboard does one find oneself marching along a coastline overlooking what appears to be the ocean -- and facing west? In some cases, the sense of dislocation is more than just geographic. The visitor to Nova Scotia happens upon places of such isolated splendor that it is difficult to believe that one is still tethered to the land mass of North America, a mere 90-minute flight from Boston, and has not, in fact, passed over into some Nordic fantasy land.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jordan Bartel, assistant editor, b | February 17, 2013
If you're a big fan, you already knew what was coming in the season finale. But it didn't make it any easier -- or less heartbreaking -- to watch. The majority of the Season 3 "Downton" finale, or the "Christmas special" as its called in the U.K., took place in Scotland, where the whole family (minus Branson) visits the Highlands home of the Dowager's niece, Susan, and her husband, Shrimpy. Most of the trip included bagpipes, hunting, more bagpipes and Scottish reel dancing. But more on that later (and more on O'Brien meeting her Scottish lady's maid doppelganger)
NEWS
By Lisa Kawata and Lisa Kawata,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 9, 2004
HEIDI RHODES says she doesn't have an ounce of Scottish blood in her. But mention the words "Highland fling," and she easily shows off her knowledge of Scottish Highland dancing, the Celtic art form that captured her heart 14 years ago. Rhodes' passion took on a new meaning six years ago when her daughter, Jessica Schmitz, now 13, decided to follow in her footsteps. Rhodes and her daughter are members of the Columbia School of Highland Dance, started in 1976 by Bonnie Wylie. The school, now in Elkridge, teaches Scottish Highland dancing, an energetic blending of balletic movements with precise jumps based on the regimented training of British seamen.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jarrett Graver and Jarrett Graver,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | October 9, 1997
It's hard to believe that a pair of flinty blue eyes and two knobby knees under a tartan kilt could grant a whole nation of hale and hearty people instant international cachet, but that's just what happened a few years ago, when Mel Gibson's rabble-rousing blockbuster, "Braveheart," endeared Scotland, that rugged little chunk of real estate north of England, to millions worldwide.This Saturday, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the Sixth Annual Anne Arundel Scottish Highland Games at the county fairgrounds in Crownsville, you too can revel in the vibrant and richly textured culture that has flourished for a thousand years, long before any expensive Hollywood film crews could capture it on celluloid.
FEATURES
By New York Times News Service | December 23, 1993
The kilt has gone punk. Well, maybe post-punk. That's the term used by Kalman Ruttenstein, Bloomingdale's fashion director, to describe the micromini kilts fastened with slews of safety pins, shown recently in the store's windows in New York.He might also be talking about the teeny-weeny kilts in Anna Sui's spring show, worn with bare midriffs, low-slung silver belts and silver Lurex knee-highs. The kilt has come a long way from the Scottish highlands.The best places to find the ultrashort ones right now are Bloomingdale's and Bergdorf Goodman.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | April 25, 1992
I have trouble with wines. I can never remember whether the red goes with the Wheaties or the Cheerios. And maybe that's why I had a little trouble with "Year of the Comet," a movie about wine.According to press notes, it grew out of no more compelling raison d'etre than director Peter Yates and screenwriter William Goldman had apartments near each other in New York and summer homes near each other in Southern France (tough life, eh, guys?) and they spent many merry afternoons together discovering that they shared enthusiasms for wine, Southern France and the Scottish Highlands.
TRAVEL
July 10, 2005
Heights of Scotland Rugged scenery attracts royals, commoners alike You don't have to be royal to enjoy a majestic time in the Scottish Highlands near Balmoral, the sweeping estate where Prince Charles and Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall, spent their recent honeymoon. All you need is an appetite for healthy outdoor pursuits and enough time to appreciate the beautiful scenery of purple heather-clad glens, rich pine woods and flowing rivers. Anyone in a rush risks being frustrated by the twisty, narrow Highland roads that can turn a trip of several dozen miles into a long drive, albeit one the traveler is unlikely to forget -- not least because of the locals' alarmingly fast driving.
NEWS
By Lisa Kawata and Lisa Kawata,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 9, 2004
HEIDI RHODES says she doesn't have an ounce of Scottish blood in her. But mention the words "Highland fling," and she easily shows off her knowledge of Scottish Highland dancing, the Celtic art form that captured her heart 14 years ago. Rhodes' passion took on a new meaning six years ago when her daughter, Jessica Schmitz, now 13, decided to follow in her footsteps. Rhodes and her daughter are members of the Columbia School of Highland Dance, started in 1976 by Bonnie Wylie. The school, now in Elkridge, teaches Scottish Highland dancing, an energetic blending of balletic movements with precise jumps based on the regimented training of British seamen.
TRAVEL
By Alec MacGillis and Alec MacGillis,Sun Staff | March 2, 2003
In Nova Scotia, even the best-oriented travelers will encounter moments where they completely lose their bearings. After all, where else on the Eastern Seaboard does one find oneself marching along a coastline overlooking what appears to be the ocean -- and facing west? In some cases, the sense of dislocation is more than just geographic. The visitor to Nova Scotia happens upon places of such isolated splendor that it is difficult to believe that one is still tethered to the land mass of North America, a mere 90-minute flight from Boston, and has not, in fact, passed over into some Nordic fantasy land.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jarrett Graver and Jarrett Graver,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | October 9, 1997
It's hard to believe that a pair of flinty blue eyes and two knobby knees under a tartan kilt could grant a whole nation of hale and hearty people instant international cachet, but that's just what happened a few years ago, when Mel Gibson's rabble-rousing blockbuster, "Braveheart," endeared Scotland, that rugged little chunk of real estate north of England, to millions worldwide.This Saturday, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the Sixth Annual Anne Arundel Scottish Highland Games at the county fairgrounds in Crownsville, you too can revel in the vibrant and richly textured culture that has flourished for a thousand years, long before any expensive Hollywood film crews could capture it on celluloid.
SPORTS
By John Eisenberg | September 26, 2000
Guilty as charged: I'm a jogger, been one for years, get up and stumble through a few paces on as many mornings as possible, age willing. I've found paths in the Scottish highlands during the British Open golf tournament, in a park in Venice, Italy, during soccer's World Cup - just about every exotic place I've gone for work (and Cleveland, too). I wasn't expecting much luck in Sydney operating out of a midtown hotel, but the hotel staff pointed me down George Street to Hyde Park, through a breathtaking canopy of 250-year-old trees, into the Royal Botanic Gardens and on to the Sydney Opera House jutting out into Farm Cove.
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