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By Michael H. Price and Michael H. Price,Fort Worth Star-Telegram | November 5, 1994
Hollywood has been corrupting Asian mythology for the sake of melodrama since the beginnings of the film industry, and there's no reason to expect this tradition to cease.But where Old Hollywood based its Eastern-menace thrillers on the urgent reality of recurring Tong wars in America, the new Gramercy Pictures release "Double Dragon" takes its cue from a video game."Double Dragon" may have its merits as a computerized contest of wits and strategy, but the movie is a stinker, directed with apathy (by newcomer Jim Yukich)
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By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | April 9, 1999
"Go," the latest in this year's onslaught of teen and twentysomething comedies, lives up to its title, accelerating across the screen with jangly, vivid energy and irreverent humor.Directed by the same filmmaker who made the cheekily retro "Swingers," "Go" bears the unmistakable thumbprint of an artist whose sense of his audience and its aesthetic is unfailing. Bursting with psychedelic energy and unfolding in a quick, time-warped narrative (thanks, Mr. Tarantino), "Go" is sure to please film-goers young enough to appreciate its soundtrack (dominated by bands like No Doubt and Massive Attack)
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By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | April 9, 1999
"Go," the latest in this year's onslaught of teen and twentysomething comedies, lives up to its title, accelerating across the screen with jangly, vivid energy and irreverent humor.Directed by the same filmmaker who made the cheekily retro "Swingers," "Go" bears the unmistakable thumbprint of an artist whose sense of his audience and its aesthetic is unfailing. Bursting with psychedelic energy and unfolding in a quick, time-warped narrative (thanks, Mr. Tarantino), "Go" is sure to please film-goers young enough to appreciate its soundtrack (dominated by bands like No Doubt and Massive Attack)
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By Ian Spelling and Ian Spelling,Chicago Tribune | March 5, 1998
When Jennifer Love Hewitt talks about what she wants to be when she grows up, the words "famous actress" aren't mentioned.Would you believe that Love, star of the hot TV series "Party of Five" and the hit summer flick "I Know What You Did Last Summer," instead hopes to be the next Shel Silverstein?"
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By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,SUN STAFF | November 1, 1995
Got three hours to spare? The Metropolitan Opera premieres a new season on PBS with Strauss' "Arabella." The Disney Channel also offers a free day so cable subscribers can tune in the annual "American Teacher Awards," which include a Maryland recipient this year.* "Metropolitan Opera Presents 'Arabella' " (8 p.m.-11 p.m., MPT, Channels 22, 67) -- In the 19th season premiere from Lincoln Center, Christian Thielemann conducts and the troupe sings the Richard Strauss opera in German (with English subtitles)
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By Ian Spelling and Ian Spelling,Chicago Tribune | March 5, 1998
When Jennifer Love Hewitt talks about what she wants to be when she grows up, the words "famous actress" aren't mentioned.Would you believe that Love, star of the hot TV series "Party of Five" and the hit summer flick "I Know What You Did Last Summer," instead hopes to be the next Shel Silverstein?"
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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | February 2, 1996
Ridley Scott, the visual dynamo behind "Blade Runner" and "Alien," just to name a few, has a tall ship and a star to steer her by; he just doesn't have much of a script.Scott understands outsides as well as any director around, but his work always has a profound emotional emptiness, because he's not too swift at what's going on inside.Thus his gorgeous sailing yarn "White Squall" appears to be a movie obsessed with the physical universe, the actual outsideness of things. It's all texture, sensual information, excitement, all so brilliantly packaged that you can almost smell the salt and feel the spray.
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | April 13, 1996
Roseanne says one of the reasons she decided to produce a sketch comedy show for Rupert Murdoch's Fox network is that she's "sick of white-guy college humor," which she feels typifies "Saturday Night Live" on NBC."You know, that whole sensibility that came out of the '70s with comedians like Steve Martin," she said in a telephone press conference this week."It's some guy standing up there smugly telling you about how cool he is."That, says Roseanne, is what her "Saturday Night Special," which premieres at 11 tonight on WBFF (Channel 45 for a six-week trial run)
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By Ann Hornaday | July 30, 2000
One of the most oft-asked questions of a film critic, especially this summer, is, "How does this stuff get made?" "This stuff," of course, refers to the dreck that regularly opens at the googol-plex every Friday. How it gets made is chronicled with vicious, mean-spirited, hilarious cynicism in "Action," a failed Fox comedy series that started rebroadcast on the FX Networks cable channel June 20. The first eight episodes of the show, which stars Jay Mohr as a rapacious movie producer and Illeana Douglas as a prostitute-turned-development-executive, chronicled the greed, lust and narcissism that fuel the movie business.
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By Todd Karpovich and Todd Karpovich,Special to The Sun | September 21, 2006
All week, Eastern Tech midfielder Mike Sokolis received phone calls from his friends on No. 13 Perry Hall's soccer team about how the Gators were going to win yesterday's game. However, it was Sokolis who had the last laugh, scoring two goals to help lead the visiting Mavericks to a 3-2 upset. Sokolis also was a force on defense and helped stop a late attack by Perry Hall with several key slide tackles and defensive headers. "We have a lot of friends on [Perry Hall], which helps create a big rivalry," Sokolis said.
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | April 13, 1996
Roseanne says one of the reasons she decided to produce a sketch comedy show for Rupert Murdoch's Fox network is that she's "sick of white-guy college humor," which she feels typifies "Saturday Night Live" on NBC."You know, that whole sensibility that came out of the '70s with comedians like Steve Martin," she said in a telephone press conference this week."It's some guy standing up there smugly telling you about how cool he is."That, says Roseanne, is what her "Saturday Night Special," which premieres at 11 tonight on WBFF (Channel 45 for a six-week trial run)
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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | February 2, 1996
Ridley Scott, the visual dynamo behind "Blade Runner" and "Alien," just to name a few, has a tall ship and a star to steer her by; he just doesn't have much of a script.Scott understands outsides as well as any director around, but his work always has a profound emotional emptiness, because he's not too swift at what's going on inside.Thus his gorgeous sailing yarn "White Squall" appears to be a movie obsessed with the physical universe, the actual outsideness of things. It's all texture, sensual information, excitement, all so brilliantly packaged that you can almost smell the salt and feel the spray.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,SUN STAFF | November 1, 1995
Got three hours to spare? The Metropolitan Opera premieres a new season on PBS with Strauss' "Arabella." The Disney Channel also offers a free day so cable subscribers can tune in the annual "American Teacher Awards," which include a Maryland recipient this year.* "Metropolitan Opera Presents 'Arabella' " (8 p.m.-11 p.m., MPT, Channels 22, 67) -- In the 19th season premiere from Lincoln Center, Christian Thielemann conducts and the troupe sings the Richard Strauss opera in German (with English subtitles)
FEATURES
By Michael H. Price and Michael H. Price,Fort Worth Star-Telegram | November 5, 1994
Hollywood has been corrupting Asian mythology for the sake of melodrama since the beginnings of the film industry, and there's no reason to expect this tradition to cease.But where Old Hollywood based its Eastern-menace thrillers on the urgent reality of recurring Tong wars in America, the new Gramercy Pictures release "Double Dragon" takes its cue from a video game."Double Dragon" may have its merits as a computerized contest of wits and strategy, but the movie is a stinker, directed with apathy (by newcomer Jim Yukich)
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | June 4, 1997
Poor Pearl, we hardly knew ye."The Nanny" (8 p.m.-8: 30 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13) -- In a repeat from October, the Woman With the Most Annoying Voice In the World teaches Donald O'Connor how to dance. CBS."Party of Five" (8 p.m.-9 p.m. and 9 p.m.-10 p.m., WBFF, Channel 45) -- Fox reprises the two episodes from last season in which Bailey's (Scott Wolf) drinking problem reaches crisis point. First, his friends and siblings lure him to a family meeting, where they air their concerns. In the second hour, his drinking leads to the inevitable car accident.
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By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | December 12, 1994
It's a slow Monday, but with fresh episodes of all of the night's dramatic series -- "Melrose Place," "Party of Five" and "Northern Exposure" -- there's at least one decent alternative per hour of prime time."
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