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By Thomas C. Raup and Thomas C. Raup,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 13, 1996
"The Laws of Our Fathers," by Scott Turow. Farrar, Straus, Giroux. 532 pages. $26.95One expects a Scott Turow novel to be a high-suspense tale of crime and courtroom theatrics. Realistic people lust, stumble, suffer, display wit and occasional courage. The reader gradually surrenders to a master storyteller, and is led through a series of legal intrigues to a surprising and climactic end. Release. Recreation."The Laws of Our Fathers" has those characteristics. A notorious crime in a city that sounds and smells like Chicago.
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NEWS
By Garrison Keillor | May 25, 2010
In New York the other night, I ran into my daughter's favorite author, Mary Pope Osborne, whose "Magic Tree House" books I've read to the child at night, and a moment later, Scott Turow, who writes legal thrillers that keep people awake all night, and David Remnick, the biographer of President Barack Obama. Bang bang bang, one heavyweight after another. Erica Jong, Jeffrey Toobin, Judy Blume. It was a rooftop party in Tribeca that I got invited to via a well-connected pal, wall-to-wall authors and agents and editors and elegant young women in little black dresses, standing, white wine in hand, looking out across the Hudson at the lights of Hoboken and Jersey City, eating shrimp and scallops and spanikopita on toothpicks, all talking at once the way New Yorkers do. I grew up on the windswept plains with my nose in a book, so I am awestruck in the presence of book people, even though I have written a couple books myself.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Craig Nova and By Craig Nova,Special to the Sun | October 24, 1999
"Personal Injuries," by Scott Turow. Farrar, Strauss & Giroux. 403 pages. $27.Trying to make sense out of a Scott Turow novel is something like taking the SAT: you know that the people who put the test together really know their stuff, but yet you wish they were doing something different. Or, to put it differently, Turow is such a smart guy and he has so much talent, why doesn't he write the novel we are all waiting for: a dramatic, intense, perfectly legitimate book in which there is not one lawyer or courtroom and not one surprise predicated on withheld information?
NEWS
January 23, 2008
Scott Turow to talk about death penalty A best-selling novelist and former prosecutor is scheduled to speak to death penalty foes and lawmakers today about how he came to oppose capital punishment after studying the issue while serving on an Illinois government panel. Scott Turow, author of mystery suspense novels such as Presumed Innocent as well as Ultimate Punishment, a nonfiction book about the death penalty, will speak at 6 p.m. in the President's Conference Center at the Miller Senate Office Building in an event organized by the advocacy group Maryland Citizens Against State Executions.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,SUN STAFF | October 17, 1999
CHICAGO -- The man who answers the door in this quiet, suburban neighborhood is one of those dark, driven little men who turn up so often in the law.Those are Scott Turow's words, actually, used to describe the U.S. attorney who sets his latest book, "Personal Injuries" (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, $27), in motion. It's an inside joke, a throw-away line written with a smile for those who will get it. It's not only the physical resemblance between the book's prosecutor, Stan Sennett, and his creator that is striking.
NEWS
By Garrison Keillor | May 25, 2010
In New York the other night, I ran into my daughter's favorite author, Mary Pope Osborne, whose "Magic Tree House" books I've read to the child at night, and a moment later, Scott Turow, who writes legal thrillers that keep people awake all night, and David Remnick, the biographer of President Barack Obama. Bang bang bang, one heavyweight after another. Erica Jong, Jeffrey Toobin, Judy Blume. It was a rooftop party in Tribeca that I got invited to via a well-connected pal, wall-to-wall authors and agents and editors and elegant young women in little black dresses, standing, white wine in hand, looking out across the Hudson at the lights of Hoboken and Jersey City, eating shrimp and scallops and spanikopita on toothpicks, all talking at once the way New Yorkers do. I grew up on the windswept plains with my nose in a book, so I am awestruck in the presence of book people, even though I have written a couple books myself.
NEWS
November 6, 2005
"All parents keep secrets from their children. My father, it seemed, kept more than most." 'ORDINARY HEROES' BY SCOTT TUROW
NEWS
January 23, 2008
Scott Turow to talk about death penalty A best-selling novelist and former prosecutor is scheduled to speak to death penalty foes and lawmakers today about how he came to oppose capital punishment after studying the issue while serving on an Illinois government panel. Scott Turow, author of mystery suspense novels such as Presumed Innocent as well as Ultimate Punishment, a nonfiction book about the death penalty, will speak at 6 p.m. in the President's Conference Center at the Miller Senate Office Building in an event organized by the advocacy group Maryland Citizens Against State Executions.
NEWS
By SARAH WEINMAN and SARAH WEINMAN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 6, 2005
Ordinary Heroes Scott Turow Farrar, Straus and Giroux / 368 pages When someone tells a story, the first instinct is to accept it at face value and not look too closely at how well it holds up. All it takes is a single event to cast doubt on the entire story from start to finish. Scott Turow's new novel (his first since 2002's Reversible Errors) wears the outward trappings of a spirited wartime tale - and does so quite well - but he's more interested in the lies people tell to spare their loved ones pain, and the secrets they keep in order to survive another day. Material like this should have made for a standout effort, but the result ends up curiously unfulfilling.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Frank H. Wu and By Frank H. Wu,Special to the Sun | November 3, 2002
Reversible Errors, by Scott Turow. Farrar Straus & Giroux. 448 pages. $28. You write like a lawyer" would be a compliment if Scott Turow were the model. After penning the definitive account of the first year of law school based on his experiences at Harvard, he virtually invented the legal thriller. Although many other lawyer novelists have since crowded the field, the "Bard of the Litigious Age," as Time magazine dubbed him, returns in fine form with Reversible Errors. At the center of his latest book is death row inmate Rommy Gandolph Convicted a decade ago of a triple homicide, he is weeks away from execution when he is given a pro bono attorney.
NEWS
By Alan Cheuse and Alan Cheuse,Chicago Tribune | November 19, 2006
Limitations Scott Turow Picador / 197 pages / $13 (paper) I'll defer cuteness. I won't make a mock plea before a jury of serious readers and argue that Scott Turow's new novel, the paperback original Limitations, deserves to be sentenced to your bedside reading table. But it does. It's a quieter book than some of Turow's previous best-selling intelligent legal thrillers, any one of which makes a John Grisham novel seem like mighty thin gruel. But it remains an engrossing work of fiction that originally saw the light in serial form in The New York Times Magazine.
NEWS
November 6, 2005
"All parents keep secrets from their children. My father, it seemed, kept more than most." 'ORDINARY HEROES' BY SCOTT TUROW
NEWS
By SARAH WEINMAN and SARAH WEINMAN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 6, 2005
Ordinary Heroes Scott Turow Farrar, Straus and Giroux / 368 pages When someone tells a story, the first instinct is to accept it at face value and not look too closely at how well it holds up. All it takes is a single event to cast doubt on the entire story from start to finish. Scott Turow's new novel (his first since 2002's Reversible Errors) wears the outward trappings of a spirited wartime tale - and does so quite well - but he's more interested in the lies people tell to spare their loved ones pain, and the secrets they keep in order to survive another day. Material like this should have made for a standout effort, but the result ends up curiously unfulfilling.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,SUN STAFF | September 9, 2004
CAMBRIDGE - This is where he always belonged, way outside any kind of city, outside rows of no-till beans invaded by wild turkeys, outside in his Eastern Shore back yard with his Weber gas grill - just plain outside. He'd like to stay, but he's needed elsewhere. Kirk Noble Bloodsworth, of thinning hair and thickening body and 44 next month, is about to embark on another phase of his story of survival. Bloodsworth, convicted of killing a 9-year-old Rosedale girl in 1984, became the first death-row inmate in the United States to be exonerated through DNA evidence.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Frank H. Wu and By Frank H. Wu,Special to the Sun | November 3, 2002
Reversible Errors, by Scott Turow. Farrar Straus & Giroux. 448 pages. $28. You write like a lawyer" would be a compliment if Scott Turow were the model. After penning the definitive account of the first year of law school based on his experiences at Harvard, he virtually invented the legal thriller. Although many other lawyer novelists have since crowded the field, the "Bard of the Litigious Age," as Time magazine dubbed him, returns in fine form with Reversible Errors. At the center of his latest book is death row inmate Rommy Gandolph Convicted a decade ago of a triple homicide, he is weeks away from execution when he is given a pro bono attorney.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Craig Nova and By Craig Nova,Special to the Sun | October 24, 1999
"Personal Injuries," by Scott Turow. Farrar, Strauss & Giroux. 403 pages. $27.Trying to make sense out of a Scott Turow novel is something like taking the SAT: you know that the people who put the test together really know their stuff, but yet you wish they were doing something different. Or, to put it differently, Turow is such a smart guy and he has so much talent, why doesn't he write the novel we are all waiting for: a dramatic, intense, perfectly legitimate book in which there is not one lawyer or courtroom and not one surprise predicated on withheld information?
NEWS
By Alan Cheuse and Alan Cheuse,Chicago Tribune | November 19, 2006
Limitations Scott Turow Picador / 197 pages / $13 (paper) I'll defer cuteness. I won't make a mock plea before a jury of serious readers and argue that Scott Turow's new novel, the paperback original Limitations, deserves to be sentenced to your bedside reading table. But it does. It's a quieter book than some of Turow's previous best-selling intelligent legal thrillers, any one of which makes a John Grisham novel seem like mighty thin gruel. But it remains an engrossing work of fiction that originally saw the light in serial form in The New York Times Magazine.
FEATURES
By Susan King and Susan King,Los Angeles Times | February 9, 1992
HOLLYWOOD -- This town went on a feeding frenzy to obtain the movie rights to Chicago lawyer Scott Turow's phenomenal first novel "Presumed Innocent.""It began a sort of Hollywood mania," Mr. Turow recalled. "It was one weekend's madness." And the big-budget film version, which starred Harrison Ford, Raul Julia and Brian Dennehy, subsequently became one of the critical and commercial hits of 1990.But Mr. Turow seems perfectly content that "The Burden of Proof," his best-selling 1990 follow-up to "Presumed," has gone the miniseries route.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,SUN STAFF | October 17, 1999
CHICAGO -- The man who answers the door in this quiet, suburban neighborhood is one of those dark, driven little men who turn up so often in the law.Those are Scott Turow's words, actually, used to describe the U.S. attorney who sets his latest book, "Personal Injuries" (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, $27), in motion. It's an inside joke, a throw-away line written with a smile for those who will get it. It's not only the physical resemblance between the book's prosecutor, Stan Sennett, and his creator that is striking.
NEWS
By Thomas C. Raup and Thomas C. Raup,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 13, 1996
"The Laws of Our Fathers," by Scott Turow. Farrar, Straus, Giroux. 532 pages. $26.95One expects a Scott Turow novel to be a high-suspense tale of crime and courtroom theatrics. Realistic people lust, stumble, suffer, display wit and occasional courage. The reader gradually surrenders to a master storyteller, and is led through a series of legal intrigues to a surprising and climactic end. Release. Recreation."The Laws of Our Fathers" has those characteristics. A notorious crime in a city that sounds and smells like Chicago.
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