Advertisement
HomeCollectionsScott Hoch
IN THE NEWS

Scott Hoch

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,SUN STAFF | April 15, 1996
AUGUSTA, Ga. -- Phil Mickelson continued his progression at the Masters yesterday.The 25-year-old left-hander from Arizona began the final round in third place, and that's where he ended, with his second straight 72. Mickelson finished 6-under, six strokes behind Nick Faldo and one behind Greg Norman. He tied for 46th as a Masters rookie in 1991, tied for 34th in 1993 and tied for seventh last year."When I had opportunities to get it going, it just stalled the last three days," said Mickelson, who opened the tournament with a 65.What did Mickelson think of Norman's final-round collapse to a final round 78?
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | July 19, 2001
LYTHAM ST. ANNES - Scott Hoch says he doesn't know what kind of reception he will get today from fans at the 130th British Open. It could be as cold as the weather Hoch hates to play in, which is one of the reasons Hoch has played in the event only three times during his career. Hoch took heat last year on both sides of the Atlantic after passing up a chance to play at St. Andrews. His return this year after a three-year absence has as much to do with a planned vacation in Italy with his wife and a contractual obligation to one of the companies he represents as it does with the golf.
Advertisement
SPORTS
By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,SUN STAFF | May 26, 1996
POTOMAC -- There have been four first-time winners on the PGA Tour this year.The conclusion of the Kemper Open today could provide a fifth.Heading into the final round at the Tournament Players Club at Avenel, the first four spots on the leader board are held by guys who never have won on the PGA Tour. It's tempting to look at the names immediately behind them -- the Dalys and Hochs and Stewarts -- and envision the newcomers toppling like so many dominoes, but it's a different game in the 1990s.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | June 7, 1998
POTOMAC -- He had a five-shot lead and seemed to be on the verge of lapping the field at the TPC at Avenel in the third round of the Kemper Open. He was doing his best imitation of Tiger Woods, cracking 300-yard drives and making one big putt after another.And then Fred Funk walked up the hill to the 13th tee yesterday afternoon.It was there he found two groups and more than a 20-minute wait ahead of him. It was also there that Funk lost his rhythm and,ultimately, much of his lead. He will find out today whether it was where he lost a tournament he had dominated since the opening round.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | June 7, 1998
POTOMAC -- He had a five-shot lead and seemed to be on the verge of lapping the field at the TPC at Avenel in the third round of the Kemper Open. He was doing his best imitation of Tiger Woods, cracking 300-yard drives and making one big putt after another.And then Fred Funk walked up the hill to the 13th tee yesterday afternoon.It was there he found two groups and more than a 20-minute wait ahead of him. It was also there that Funk lost his rhythm and,ultimately, much of his lead. He will find out today whether it was where he lost a tournament he had dominated since the opening round.
SPORTS
By John W. Stewart and John W. Stewart,Sun Staff Writer | September 17, 1994
LAKE MANASSAS, Va. -- Jay Haas, a captain's choice for the United States team, answered Hale Irwin's faith in him with some of the finest golf of the day in helping the United States to a 7 1/2 -2 1/2 lead in the inaugural Presidents Cup matches at Robert Trent Jones Golf Club yesterday.Haas, at 40 the oldest U.S. team member other than Irwin, teamed with former Wake Forest teammate Scott Hoch (two years behind him in school) for the day's two most one-sided conquests.They whipped Fulton Allem-David Frost, 6 and 5, in the morning four-ball, and Craig Parry-Tsukasa Watanabe, 4 and 3, in the afternoon foursomes.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,Sun Staff Correspondent | June 15, 1991
CHASKA, Minn. -- The United States Golf Association tried mightily this year to make sure that Hazeltine did not play with the same ease that Medinah did last year for its Open championship.The rough was grown higher.The greens were shaved closer.The pins were tucked in the most treacherous positions.Maybe USGA officials should have worked their magic on the weather, somehow keeping the rain from again ruining this usually masochistic little four-day orgy of high scores and short fuses.For the field at the 91st Open championship, the only thing finer than Medinah is a former cow pasture called Hazeltine.
SPORTS
By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,SUN STAFF | March 30, 1997
PONTE VEDRA BEACH, Fla. -- If the "X-Files" is looking for a scriptwriter, Scott Hoch is available.Hoch expounded on several conspiracy theories yesterday, as he explained his recent silence with the media. He was also full of birdies, shooting a 7-under 65 at The Players Course at Sawgrass to add some suspense to Steve Elkington's bid for his second win at the TPC.When Elkington birdied No. 11, he had a five-shot lead on Hoch, but the spread was shaved to two strokes by the end of the third round.
SPORTS
By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,SUN STAFF | May 25, 1996
POTOMAC -- Scott McCarron doesn't need an escort to protect him from an adoring mob on his way from the parking lot to the clubhouse, but at least he's enjoying the perks of being a winner on the PGA Tour.Since McCarron won in New Orleans in March, he gets a courtesy car. After his top 10 finish at the Masters, fewer fans confuse him with a jockey and call him Chris. Maybe nicest of all for the ego, he has been included in some featured tee times to start tournaments."I'm playing with tournament winners on Thursday and Friday," McCarron said of his playing partners for the first two rounds of the Kemper Open.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | July 19, 2001
LYTHAM ST. ANNES - Scott Hoch says he doesn't know what kind of reception he will get today from fans at the 130th British Open. It could be as cold as the weather Hoch hates to play in, which is one of the reasons Hoch has played in the event only three times during his career. Hoch took heat last year on both sides of the Atlantic after passing up a chance to play at St. Andrews. His return this year after a three-year absence has as much to do with a planned vacation in Italy with his wife and a contractual obligation to one of the companies he represents as it does with the golf.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent | June 12, 1997
BETHESDA -- Take a poll of an electorate consisting of sports fans and local television sports anchors, and next to a stadium itself, the hands-down favorite place to hang out would be ESPN's "SportsCenter."But there's a great big world out there outside "SportsCenter," as Linda Cohn, one of its stalwarts, is hoping to find out this week as she covers the U.S. Open from the Congressional Country Club for the network."Within the last six months, I've found the keys to unlock the chain to the "SportsCenter" desk," said Cohn.
SPORTS
By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,SUN STAFF | March 30, 1997
PONTE VEDRA BEACH, Fla. -- If the "X-Files" is looking for a scriptwriter, Scott Hoch is available.Hoch expounded on several conspiracy theories yesterday, as he explained his recent silence with the media. He was also full of birdies, shooting a 7-under 65 at The Players Course at Sawgrass to add some suspense to Steve Elkington's bid for his second win at the TPC.When Elkington birdied No. 11, he had a five-shot lead on Hoch, but the spread was shaved to two strokes by the end of the third round.
SPORTS
By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,SUN STAFF | May 27, 1996
POTOMAC -- It was the start of a beautiful relationship that delivered victory at the Kemper Open yesterday, but Steve Stricker blushes when he recollects the first time he laid eyes on his wife and caddie, Nicki.Stricker was a junior star in Wisconsin, but he turned down the recruiting pitch from Badgers coach Dennis Tiziani because he wanted to get away from home. In the summer before his junior year at Illinois, however, Stricker finally broke down and drove to Madison for some swing tips from Tiziani.
SPORTS
By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,SUN STAFF | May 26, 1996
POTOMAC -- There have been four first-time winners on the PGA Tour this year.The conclusion of the Kemper Open today could provide a fifth.Heading into the final round at the Tournament Players Club at Avenel, the first four spots on the leader board are held by guys who never have won on the PGA Tour. It's tempting to look at the names immediately behind them -- the Dalys and Hochs and Stewarts -- and envision the newcomers toppling like so many dominoes, but it's a different game in the 1990s.
SPORTS
By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,SUN STAFF | May 25, 1996
POTOMAC -- Scott McCarron doesn't need an escort to protect him from an adoring mob on his way from the parking lot to the clubhouse, but at least he's enjoying the perks of being a winner on the PGA Tour.Since McCarron won in New Orleans in March, he gets a courtesy car. After his top 10 finish at the Masters, fewer fans confuse him with a jockey and call him Chris. Maybe nicest of all for the ego, he has been included in some featured tee times to start tournaments."I'm playing with tournament winners on Thursday and Friday," McCarron said of his playing partners for the first two rounds of the Kemper Open.
SPORTS
By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,SUN STAFF | April 15, 1996
AUGUSTA, Ga. -- Phil Mickelson continued his progression at the Masters yesterday.The 25-year-old left-hander from Arizona began the final round in third place, and that's where he ended, with his second straight 72. Mickelson finished 6-under, six strokes behind Nick Faldo and one behind Greg Norman. He tied for 46th as a Masters rookie in 1991, tied for 34th in 1993 and tied for seventh last year."When I had opportunities to get it going, it just stalled the last three days," said Mickelson, who opened the tournament with a 65.What did Mickelson think of Norman's final-round collapse to a final round 78?
SPORTS
By Milton Kent | June 12, 1997
BETHESDA -- Take a poll of an electorate consisting of sports fans and local television sports anchors, and next to a stadium itself, the hands-down favorite place to hang out would be ESPN's "SportsCenter."But there's a great big world out there outside "SportsCenter," as Linda Cohn, one of its stalwarts, is hoping to find out this week as she covers the U.S. Open from the Congressional Country Club for the network."Within the last six months, I've found the keys to unlock the chain to the "SportsCenter" desk," said Cohn.
SPORTS
May 27, 1991
Purtzer drives 'Texas wedge' into ColonialWinner uses putter to cash in his chipFORT WORTH, Texas -- Tom Purtzer gave a whole new meaning to the golf term "Texas wedge" on the way to his three-shot victory yesterday in the Southwestern Bell Colonial.Purtzer, 30, long noted as the possessor of one of the most-envied swings on the PGA Tour, set up the fourth victory of his 17-season career with a highly unorthodox stroke from near a bunker on the 13th hole.It was a variation on the "Texas wedge," an expression coined for those Depression-era touring pros from Texas who grew up on hard, sun-scorched courses and frequently used the putter from well-off the green.
SPORTS
By John W. Stewart and John W. Stewart,Sun Staff Writer | September 17, 1994
LAKE MANASSAS, Va. -- Jay Haas, a captain's choice for the United States team, answered Hale Irwin's faith in him with some of the finest golf of the day in helping the United States to a 7 1/2 -2 1/2 lead in the inaugural Presidents Cup matches at Robert Trent Jones Golf Club yesterday.Haas, at 40 the oldest U.S. team member other than Irwin, teamed with former Wake Forest teammate Scott Hoch (two years behind him in school) for the day's two most one-sided conquests.They whipped Fulton Allem-David Frost, 6 and 5, in the morning four-ball, and Craig Parry-Tsukasa Watanabe, 4 and 3, in the afternoon foursomes.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,Sun Staff Correspondent | June 15, 1991
CHASKA, Minn. -- The United States Golf Association tried mightily this year to make sure that Hazeltine did not play with the same ease that Medinah did last year for its Open championship.The rough was grown higher.The greens were shaved closer.The pins were tucked in the most treacherous positions.Maybe USGA officials should have worked their magic on the weather, somehow keeping the rain from again ruining this usually masochistic little four-day orgy of high scores and short fuses.For the field at the 91st Open championship, the only thing finer than Medinah is a former cow pasture called Hazeltine.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.