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NEWS
March 18, 2004
An interview with Jacqueline Easley, founder of the Soho Bookworms of Howard County. Why did you start the book club? I've always been an avid reader since I was little, but I fell out of the act of reading after I got out of college and started working. About four years ago, I read the book Interpreter of Maladies by Jhumpa Lahiri. It is a collection of short stories about the Indian-American immigrant experience. The book was so beautifully crafted. The characters were compelling. I was reminded how satisfying an experience it is to read a good book.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 29, 2013
Eleanor S. Pope, a homemaker who knew the Jazz Age writer F. Scott Fitzgerald in her childhood, died Sept. 22 of kidney failure at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. She was 90. The daughter of Bayard Turnbull, a noted Baltimore architect, and Margaret Carroll Turnbull, an educator, the former Eleanor Sterett Turnbull was born in Baltimore. Mrs. Pope was raised at Trimbush, her family's 22-acre estate on La Paix Lane, west of York Road and north of Rodgers Forge. Today, outside of the twin stone gates that mark the entrance to the lane, nothing remains of the old manor house that was demolished in 1961.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | October 22, 2012
Dr. James Roncie Duke, a retired ophthalmologist and Johns Hopkins pathologist who was a collector of F. Scott Fitzgerald's works and lived in what once was the novelist's Baltimore home, died of complications from dementia Oct. 16 in Bolton Hill. He was 88. Born in Tampa, Fla., he was the son of an ophthalmologist. He attended Plant High School in Tampa and was a 1942 graduate of Staunton Military Academy in Virginia. In an autobiographical essay he wrote for a 50th class reunion at Princeton University, he said, "I wanted a change of scene from the South" when he applied to college.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 13, 2013
'Modern Terrorism' Imagine "Homeland" with a laugh track. You cannot help but admire the nerve of playwright Jon Kern (a writer for "The Simpsons") in tackling such intensely emotional and divisive material, and fleshing out so vividly the three characters who, in their sparsely furnished Brooklyn apartment, nonchalantly plan to rain destruction on a Manhattan landmark. But even 12 years after 9/11, are we really ready to laugh at Muslim terrorists? Maybe. There's certainly fun to be had with the sitcom-worthy portion of the dialogue and antics, starting with the play-opening, bombs-in-the-briefs scene.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 29, 2013
Eleanor S. Pope, a homemaker who knew the Jazz Age writer F. Scott Fitzgerald in her childhood, died Sept. 22 of kidney failure at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. She was 90. The daughter of Bayard Turnbull, a noted Baltimore architect, and Margaret Carroll Turnbull, an educator, the former Eleanor Sterett Turnbull was born in Baltimore. Mrs. Pope was raised at Trimbush, her family's 22-acre estate on La Paix Lane, west of York Road and north of Rodgers Forge. Today, outside of the twin stone gates that mark the entrance to the lane, nothing remains of the old manor house that was demolished in 1961.
NEWS
By MICHAEL PAKENHAM | January 4, 1998
The ghost of the Jazz Age is stalking this land, and many other lands - even in Asia and the more liberal corners of Islam. Excess, vulgarity, huge fortunes swiftly and arrogantly won and lost, opulently preening self-indulgence and more. The Jazz Age? Take Francis Scott Key Fitzgerald's famous line: "It was an age of miracles, it was an age of art, it was an age of excess, it was an age of satire."That era - the 10 years from the end of World War I until the crash of 1929 - was also the age of Fitzgerald, who was both repelled and hypnotized by it, and spent an intense, brief, but productive life exploring it in prose.
NEWS
By James H. Bready and James H. Bready,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 22, 1996
All over, people are honoring F. Scott Fitzgerald, who was born 100 years ago Tuesday. There will be observances in St. Paul, Minn., his place of birth; in Rockville, where Fitzgerald (who was proud of having Star-Spangled Banner lineage, on his father's side) and his wife, Zelda, are buried; and elsewhere among the several dozen places where he lived, between 1896 and 1940.Baltimore doesn't seem to have much planned, even though three of his 1930s residential addresses were local. And Princeton University, his alma mater, has been distracted by an anniversary of its own - its 250th.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | December 16, 2000
Quietly and without fanfare, the 25-year quest of a Baltimore educator and writer came to fruition this summer, when a small park in Bolton Hill was finally dedicated to the memory of F. Scott Fitzgerald, the Jazz Age chronicler who died 60 years ago this month. The park, at the southeast corner of Bolton and Wilson streets, is just a few blocks from where Fitzgerald had lived during the 1930s. A neighborhood gathering point for Bolton Hill denizens of all ages, it is not uncommon to see senior citizens busily chatting as children laugh and play games.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | January 8, 2004
London may have Charles Dickens, Sigmund Freud, Karl Marx and even Jimi Hendrix. But Baltimore's Bolton Hill has F. Scott Fitzgerald, Woodrow Wilson, the aide-de-camp to Gen. Robert E. Lee and the scientist who discovered biorhythms. Whether they lived across the Atlantic or here in Baltimore, they all have something in common - a blue plaque on the house where they once lived. It's a century-old concept in London to adorn the houses of famous people with the plaques, but Bolton Hill - one of Baltimore's oldest and most elegant neighborhoods - has just imported the idea.
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | April 11, 1996
On a bright April morning in 1936, F. Scott Fitzgerald woke up in a furnished apartment overlooking the Johns Hopkins University feeling better than he had for weeks.He was no longer the golden youth who had written "This Side of Paradise," the 1920 novel of collegiate life at Princeton that made him the first real superstar in American literature. Illness and alcoholism had plagued him for years. He was pushing 40 and felt like an old cracked plate. He was, in fact, living the years of "The Crack-Up," his classic account of an artist coming apart.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | July 13, 2013
Whether approached from the south, through gently rolling fields of farmland, or from the north, past the sacred ground of Antietam and then across a graceful bridge over the Potomac, the drive here can be remarkably tranquil and restorative. But upon arrival in this quaint historic town, things can turn gritty, grim, violent, vulgar and downright scary in no time — if your destination is the 23rd annual Contemporary American Theater Festival. The 2013 festival, which opened last weekend, is ripe with edgy themes, including Islamic terrorism and tortured human relationships.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | April 12, 2013
Frances T. Kidder, a former real estate saleswoman, museum docent and world traveler, died Thursday from a stroke at the Blakehurst retirement community in Towson. She was 96. The daughter of Bayard Turnbull, a prominent Baltimore architect, and Margaret Carroll Turnbull, an educator, the former Frances Litchfield Turnbull was born in Baltimore. She was a direct descendant of 18th-century Supreme Court Justice Samuel Chase, who also was a signer of the Declaration of Independence.
FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal | February 1, 2013
If you want a taste of the Gilded Age, just plunk down $450,000, the asking price for a Baltimore townhouse once owned by F. Scott Fitzgerald. The author who gave us "The Great Gatsby" and other classics lived in Towson and Baltimore while wife Zelda was being treated for her mental health problems. Now the four-bedroom townhouse at 1307 Park Avenue in Bolton Hill is up for sale. Here's what the University of Baltimore's Literary Heritage says about his time here: "In 1932, Fitzgerald brought [Zelda]
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | February 1, 2013
Calling all literati and English majors with decent paychecks: You have a chance to own a home once graced by F. Scott and Zelda Fitzgerald. The Bolton Hill home where Fitzgerald lived during a stint during the 1930s and wrote "Tender Is the Night,"  just went on the market in an estate sale. The handsome rowhouse at 1307 Park Ave. has four bedrooms, four baths and 3,600 square feet of pure conversation starter. The ad on Estately boasts "gracious & elegant" living and "unadulterated" original details.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | October 22, 2012
Dr. James Roncie Duke, a retired ophthalmologist and Johns Hopkins pathologist who was a collector of F. Scott Fitzgerald's works and lived in what once was the novelist's Baltimore home, died of complications from dementia Oct. 16 in Bolton Hill. He was 88. Born in Tampa, Fla., he was the son of an ophthalmologist. He attended Plant High School in Tampa and was a 1942 graduate of Staunton Military Academy in Virginia. In an autobiographical essay he wrote for a 50th class reunion at Princeton University, he said, "I wanted a change of scene from the South" when he applied to college.
NEWS
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,tim.smith@baltsun.com | September 27, 2009
Of all the famed folk who called Baltimore home at one point or another, F. Scott Fitzgerald may be the least-commemorated locally. But the city played a substantial part in the author's life, something the F. Scott Fitzgerald Society will underscore during its international conference here this week. The society meets every two years, alternating between U.S. and European sites with connections to Fitzgerald and his wife, Zelda, from St. Paul, Minn., (F. Scott's birthplace) to the south of France (where "The Great Gatsby" was written)
NEWS
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,tim.smith@baltsun.com | September 27, 2009
Of all the famed folk who called Baltimore home at one point or another, F. Scott Fitzgerald may be the least-commemorated locally. But the city played a substantial part in the author's life, something the F. Scott Fitzgerald Society will underscore during its international conference here this week. The society meets every two years, alternating between U.S. and European sites with connections to Fitzgerald and his wife, Zelda, from St. Paul, Minn., (F. Scott's birthplace) to the south of France (where "The Great Gatsby" was written)
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | June 4, 1998
Samuel Jackson Lanahan Sr., a tax expert and founding partner of the prominent Washington law firm of Wilmer, Cutler & Pickering, died Friday of a pulmonary embolism at a hospital in Torquay, England. He was 79.Known as Jack, he was a resident of Trappe, in Talbot County on the Eastern Shore, since he retired in 1981. He also had a home in Dartmouth, England, where he was vacationing at the time of his death.The Baltimore native was the son of William Wallace Lanahan Sr., a prominent philanthropist and investment banker, and Margareta Pleasants Bonsal.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | March 30, 2007
F. Scott Fitzgerald said "Action is character." In The Lookout, Scott Frank's writing-directing debut, he tries to capture character in inaction. Set in Kansas City, Kan., and bleak environs that could use a splash of blood, The Lookout is a heist film that climaxes in a flurry of bullets and collapsing bodies. But for long periods, the pivotal figure becomes passive and the most fascinating one gets stuck off-screen. The Lookout (Miramax) Starring Joseph Gordon-Levitt, Jeff Daniels. Directed by Scott Frank.
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