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By Kathleen Parker | February 25, 2010
The RINO hunt is back on, and the coveted trophy is Scott Brown. Inevitably and predictably, the new senator from Massachusetts -- Mr. 41, Mr. I-Drive-A-Truck, tea party poster dude -- has disappointed his base by, alas, representing his constituents. It's the purity test all over again; only this time, the stakes are high and the weird are turning seriously pro. Not that the tea partiers are weird, not most of them, anyway. But some are at risk of flying off into the blood-red zone of wing-nuttery.
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NEWS
By Erin Cox and Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | November 12, 2013
Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler asked his Democratic rivals Tuesday to keep third-party spending out of the race for governor, pointing to other states where such agreements are said to have cut down on negative attack ads. Gansler's call for a "clean" primary campaign would exclude advertisements paid for by political action committees, unions and special interests - a call so broad that it would exclude several of the powerful groups that...
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NEWS
January 20, 2010
Let us hope that the Scott Brown victory in Massachusetts will finally bring the Obama administration to the realization that we the people do not support the direction our country is headed and are fed up with broken promises. Unless an immediate and dramatic change in course is made, a lot of Democrats will be out of a job come November! Benedict Frederick Jr., Pasadena Send your comments to talkback@baltimoresun.com.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 1, 2013
Walter Scott Brown, a retired Baltimore & Ohio Railroad civil engineer whose career overseeing the railroad's infrastructure spanned nearly 40 years, died Monday at the Fairhaven retirement community in Sykesville of complications from a fall he suffered last month. Mr. Brown, who family members said "remained sharp until the end of his life," was 106. The son of a building contractor and a homemaker, Walter Scott Brown was born at home in Lafayette Square, where he was raised.
NEWS
By JEAN MARBELLA | January 24, 2010
He's the new Republican voters were sending to Washington, taking over a seat that had been in Democratic hands for decades, and the news media couldn't get enough of him - camera lights trailed his every step, notebooks and tape recorders duly captured his every pronouncement. His name: Michael Flanagan. I know: Who? Flanagan was something of a Scott Brown, circa 1994. Rather than winning the Senate seat that the late Ted Kennedy had held for 47 years, as Brown did this week, Flanagan had unseated the 36-year veteran of the House, the powerful (if at that point criminally indicted)
NEWS
By Kathleen Parker | January 21, 2010
There will be much harrumphing and punditry in the next few days about the meaning of Scott Brown's victory and his phenomenal campaign for Ted Kennedy's U.S. Senate seat. How, in the final days of an election all but certain to go to the Democrats, did Mr. Brown, a mere state senator, manage to raise millions and rattle the machinery of his blue-hearted state? Democrats who see the world through denial-colored glasses want to blame their candidate, state Attorney General Martha Coakley, for her halfhearted, tone-deaf campaign.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella Jean.MARBELLA @baltsun.com | January 24, 2010
H e's the new Republican voters were sending to Washington, taking over a seat that had been in Democratic hands for decades, and the news media couldn't get enough of him - camera lights trailed his every step, notebooks and tape recorders duly captured his every pronouncement. His name: Michael Flanagan. I know: Who? Flanagan was something of a Scott Brown, circa 1994. Rather than winning the Senate seat that the late Ted Kennedy had held for 47 years, as Brown did this week, Flanagan had unseated the 36-year veteran of the House, the powerful (if at that point criminally indicted)
NEWS
By Ron Smith | January 22, 2010
S miles were few, but there were plenty of scowls Tuesday night on the usually smug faces of MSNBC's fervently liberal show hosts. Chris Matthews hasn't looked this unhappy since his one-time boss, Tip O'Neill, passed from this mortal coil. Nora O'Donnell, network reporter and Obama enthusiast, was unable to muster even a trace of a grin throughout the evening, as it became clear that the late polling in Massachusetts' special election was accurate and that upstart Republican state senator Scott Brown was going to beat Democrat Martha Coakley and take the U.S. Senate seat held by a Kennedy for almost all of the last 58 years.
NEWS
By Susan Reimer | January 25, 2010
There's good news for any of us who have one of those ill-advised nude photo sessions in our past. Scott Brown's election to the U.S. Senate means those indiscretions no longer matter. The voters in Massachusetts sent the buff Republican to Washington despite pictures of him in the buff in Cosmopolitan magazine back in 1982, when he was a student struggling to pay his law school bills. Is this America, or what? In this country, anybody can sell pictures of their body and still grow up to single-handedly derail health care reform during his first week on the job. I hope they let the Miss America people know about this.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman, The Baltimore Sun | November 22, 2011
He lives a continent away, and serves aboard an aircraft carrier soon to be deployed to the Arabian Sea. But a 3,000-mile stretch won't stop Lieutenant Commander Scott Brown, USN, from rooting on Loyola, his alma mater, in Thursday's Turkey Bowl football game against archrival Calvert Hall. "If we win, no matter where I am - Iraq, Japan or Norfolk - I give a little fist pump," said Brown, one-time star running back for the Dons. "If we lose, well . . . a loss is uncalled for, it's ridiculous.
NEWS
By Kathleen Parker | February 25, 2010
The RINO hunt is back on, and the coveted trophy is Scott Brown. Inevitably and predictably, the new senator from Massachusetts -- Mr. 41, Mr. I-Drive-A-Truck, tea party poster dude -- has disappointed his base by, alas, representing his constituents. It's the purity test all over again; only this time, the stakes are high and the weird are turning seriously pro. Not that the tea partiers are weird, not most of them, anyway. But some are at risk of flying off into the blood-red zone of wing-nuttery.
NEWS
February 2, 2010
The stunning victory of Republican Scott Brown, who will now be the first Republican senator from that state in decades, will now send a strong message to Washington. The citizens showed that they are furious with the liberal leadership that continues to persist in Washington. The Democrats and liberals can now no longer ignore the will of the American people who oppose government run health care and the massive deficit spending the Democrats have pushed through in Congress in the last 12 months.
NEWS
By Susan Reimer | January 25, 2010
There's good news for any of us who have one of those ill-advised nude photo sessions in our past. Scott Brown's election to the U.S. Senate means those indiscretions no longer matter. The voters in Massachusetts sent the buff Republican to Washington despite pictures of him in the buff in Cosmopolitan magazine back in 1982, when he was a student struggling to pay his law school bills. Is this America, or what? In this country, anybody can sell pictures of their body and still grow up to single-handedly derail health care reform during his first week on the job. I hope they let the Miss America people know about this.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella Jean.MARBELLA @baltsun.com | January 24, 2010
H e's the new Republican voters were sending to Washington, taking over a seat that had been in Democratic hands for decades, and the news media couldn't get enough of him - camera lights trailed his every step, notebooks and tape recorders duly captured his every pronouncement. His name: Michael Flanagan. I know: Who? Flanagan was something of a Scott Brown, circa 1994. Rather than winning the Senate seat that the late Ted Kennedy had held for 47 years, as Brown did this week, Flanagan had unseated the 36-year veteran of the House, the powerful (if at that point criminally indicted)
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