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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | March 26, 1997
Contrary to the assertion of its title, in "Cats Don't Dance" they do dance -- but so what? They're animated. The thrill of tap dancing is watching someone -- preferably human but I'd watch dogs, pigs and pigeons do it, too -- master an impossibly arcane, labor-intense and speed-dazzling set of moves with aplomb and panache.It has no point if it's drawn! It's not real. Who cares?Anyway, the movie turns out to be an ambitious but lame parody of "Singin' in the Rain," with Danny from Kokomo (that's Scott Bakula's thin voice behind the screen)
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By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | December 3, 2010
One of the great dangers of being too good in your first big TV role is that the only offers you tend to get after it are from people who want you to play another version of the same character. That's what happened with Andre Braugher after NBC's "Homicide: Life on the Street," the acclaimed Baltimore-based police drama that featured him as Detective Frank Pembleton from 1993 to 1998. Pembleton, the ├╝ber-cop, went well beyond simply solving murder cases in a fictional Charm City.
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FEATURES
By Los Angeles Times | September 30, 1991
"Necessary Roughness" offers Scott Bakula a delightful starring role as a 34-year-old farmer lured back to college to play football.Mr. Bakula, who has made his mark as a time-traveling scientist in TV's critically acclaimed "Quantum Leap," has a laid-back quality that makes him a welcome, easy-to-take presence on the big screen.The film itself is a genial, slight, entirely predictable football comedy, but it serves Mr. Bakula well. Director Stan Dragoti goes along with writers Rick Natkin and David Fuller's modest intentions and doesn't try to inflate the material with false significance.
NEWS
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,david.zurawik@baltsun.com | May 14, 2009
It is inevitable that actor Greg Kinnear's name is going to come up in any discussion of actor-comedian Joel McHale. Both became widely known through the irreverent and popular E! entertainment channel TV show now known as The Soup. And both have moved beyond it. Kinnear used the show as a launching pad to become a film star. And McHale, who appears Saturday night in a comedy concert at Baltimore's Meyerhoff Symphony Hall as he continues his winning weekly performance with The Soup, is starting to break out on screens big and small as well.
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone and Lou Cedrone,Evening Sun Staff | September 30, 1991
''Necessary Roughness'' has a number of very good lines scattered throughout the film, so it's often very funny. Unfortunately, the rest of the time it just plows along.Scott Bakula (''Quantum Leap''), Robert Loggia and Hector Elizondo play the lead roles. Bakula is a 34-year-old who returns to college where he intends to play football.The coaches need him. They've had to get rid of all their good players because of low grades and assorted scandals.Among the new players are a fullback who seems to think he is in the Marines, a wide receiver who will not wear a helmet, another wide receiver who has trouble catching the ball, a linesman who fancies himself a karate champ, and a kicker who is a girl.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik | January 14, 2001
How's this for a lineup?: Kate Capshaw, Stockard Channing, Rebecca De Mornay, Mia Farrow, Peta Wilson, S. Epatha Merkerson, Irma P. Hall, Linda Hamilton, Glenne Headly, Allison Janney, Elle Macpherson, Camryn Manheim, Tina Lifford and Lynn Whitfield. That's the cast for the Showtime miniseries, "A Girl Thing," and the impressive thing about it is that most of these actresses deliver strong performances rather than walking through a superficial role and collecting a check, as is often the case in big-cast mini-series.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow | April 27, 1992
ON AND OFF THE AIR:* With the first California execution in 25 years in the headlines just last week (of convicted double murderer Robert Alton Harris), NBC has an unusually timely made-for-television movie tonight."In the Shadow of a Killer" stars Scott Bakula ("Quantum Leap") as a policeman who opposes capital punishment. And his moral stance brings him into conflict with fellow officers when he apprehends a suspect in the murder of another police officer.Of course, things get mixed up when Bakula's character also becomes the apparent target of a mob contract.
NEWS
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,david.zurawik@baltsun.com | May 14, 2009
It is inevitable that actor Greg Kinnear's name is going to come up in any discussion of actor-comedian Joel McHale. Both became widely known through the irreverent and popular E! entertainment channel TV show now known as The Soup. And both have moved beyond it. Kinnear used the show as a launching pad to become a film star. And McHale, who appears Saturday night in a comedy concert at Baltimore's Meyerhoff Symphony Hall as he continues his winning weekly performance with The Soup, is starting to break out on screens big and small as well.
FEATURES
By Allan Johnson and Allan Johnson,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | May 23, 2001
In many ways, the end of UPN's "Star Trek: Voyager" is indicative of its lowly station within the "Trek"universe. In the eyes of Trekkers (as the devoted fan base likes to be called), the third spinoff of the popular science-fiction franchise has always been inferior in storylines and characters to the rousing "The Next Generation" and the complex and darker "Deep Space Nine." It took a few years after the series' 1995 debut before plots went beyond the standard "we meet, we conflict, we go on our way" level.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | October 4, 1996
Lots of sci-fi season premieres are on the tube tonight."Maryland Teacher of the Year Awards" (7 p.m.-8 p.m., MPT, Channels 22 and 67) -- The best teacher in the state will be chosen from a field of seven finalists in a live presentation."
FEATURES
By John Coffren and John Coffren,SUN STAFF | September 10, 2003
The Enterprise is under attack both on screen and off. In the past year, Star Trek: Nemesis (2002) earned $43 million, the lowest box office returns in film franchise history. Viacom, the conglomerate that ultimately owns Star Trek, was sued by Activision because it feared its Trek-themed computer games wouldn't sell. Meanwhile, the entire franchise has been lambasted by fans and the media alike. TV writer/producer Brannon Braga's response? Send in the marines. That is, the space marines or MACO (Military Assault Command Operations)
FEATURES
By Allan Johnson and Allan Johnson,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | May 23, 2001
In many ways, the end of UPN's "Star Trek: Voyager" is indicative of its lowly station within the "Trek"universe. In the eyes of Trekkers (as the devoted fan base likes to be called), the third spinoff of the popular science-fiction franchise has always been inferior in storylines and characters to the rousing "The Next Generation" and the complex and darker "Deep Space Nine." It took a few years after the series' 1995 debut before plots went beyond the standard "we meet, we conflict, we go on our way" level.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik | January 14, 2001
How's this for a lineup?: Kate Capshaw, Stockard Channing, Rebecca De Mornay, Mia Farrow, Peta Wilson, S. Epatha Merkerson, Irma P. Hall, Linda Hamilton, Glenne Headly, Allison Janney, Elle Macpherson, Camryn Manheim, Tina Lifford and Lynn Whitfield. That's the cast for the Showtime miniseries, "A Girl Thing," and the impressive thing about it is that most of these actresses deliver strong performances rather than walking through a superficial role and collecting a check, as is often the case in big-cast mini-series.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | March 26, 1997
Contrary to the assertion of its title, in "Cats Don't Dance" they do dance -- but so what? They're animated. The thrill of tap dancing is watching someone -- preferably human but I'd watch dogs, pigs and pigeons do it, too -- master an impossibly arcane, labor-intense and speed-dazzling set of moves with aplomb and panache.It has no point if it's drawn! It's not real. Who cares?Anyway, the movie turns out to be an ambitious but lame parody of "Singin' in the Rain," with Danny from Kokomo (that's Scott Bakula's thin voice behind the screen)
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | October 4, 1996
Lots of sci-fi season premieres are on the tube tonight."Maryland Teacher of the Year Awards" (7 p.m.-8 p.m., MPT, Channels 22 and 67) -- The best teacher in the state will be chosen from a field of seven finalists in a live presentation."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Russell Lissau and Russell Lissau,Special to The Sun | September 1, 1995
More than a decade ago, Stephen King told the world that he had "seen the future of horror and it is named Clive Barker."Today, after having published some of the most original horror stories to hit bookshelves in years, and turning a cinematic bad guy who has a pin cushion for a head into a worldwide icon, Clive Barker has shown that King wasn't blowing smoke.And although it's been several years since Mr. Barker actually has written an all-out horror story -- his latest works have been high fantasy and, of all things, a children's story -- his newest film, "Lord of Illusions," is a return to the genre for which he is best known.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kridler and Chris Kridler,Sun Staff Writer | March 24, 1995
The obvious jokes in "Major Payne" may give you minor pain, but laughter is pretty good medicine, and this film does have laughs.Damon Wayans stars as Major Payne, a none-too-bright killer for the Marines who finds himself removed from the service, the only life he knows. A mentor digs him up a spot as the Junior ROTC chief at a private school, but the major, whose only idea of fun is taking apart his guns and putting them back together while he hangs upside down and blindfolded, has a bit of trouble adjusting.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Russell Lissau and Russell Lissau,Special to The Sun | September 1, 1995
More than a decade ago, Stephen King told the world that he had "seen the future of horror and it is named Clive Barker."Today, after having published some of the most original horror stories to hit bookshelves in years, and turning a cinematic bad guy who has a pin cushion for a head into a worldwide icon, Clive Barker has shown that King wasn't blowing smoke.And although it's been several years since Mr. Barker actually has written an all-out horror story -- his latest works have been high fantasy and, of all things, a children's story -- his newest film, "Lord of Illusions," is a return to the genre for which he is best known.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kridler and Chris Kridler,Sun Staff Writer | March 24, 1995
The obvious jokes in "Major Payne" may give you minor pain, but laughter is pretty good medicine, and this film does have laughs.Damon Wayans stars as Major Payne, a none-too-bright killer for the Marines who finds himself removed from the service, the only life he knows. A mentor digs him up a spot as the Junior ROTC chief at a private school, but the major, whose only idea of fun is taking apart his guns and putting them back together while he hangs upside down and blindfolded, has a bit of trouble adjusting.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | August 19, 1994
In "Color of Night," Bruce Willis makes the most pugnacious, irritable therapist in the annals of psychotherapy. He thinks he's still in "Die Hard": Tell him your dreams and he'll punch your teeth out.Willis' unsuitability is merely the most obvious difficulty in what is a very troubled movie. Meant to be a steamy erotic thriller, it's more annoying than anything else. Surely you will see its Big Surprise coming by the first 15 minutes, and it never begins to achieve the kind of sultry, mesmerizing fascination it so desperately needs.
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