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By New York Times News Service Z | December 2, 1991
LONDON -- Detectives from Scotland Yard yesterday warned the British public to be "extremely vigilant" after a series of pre-dawn firebombs damaged shops in central London and the police discovered an explosives cache in a garage in London's East End.The firebombings, which caused extensive property damage but resulted in no injuries, were believed to be the work of the Irish Republican Army, according to Cmdr. George Churchill-Coleman, the chief of Scotland Yard's anti-terrorist squad.Hundreds of people were evacuated from apartments and homes in central London for several hours earlier yesterday, as firefighters fought blazes caused by the devices.
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By Laura King and Henry Chu and Laura King and Henry Chu,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 3, 2008
ISLAMABAD, Pakistan -- Pummeled by international and domestic skepticism over his government's version of Benazir Bhutto's assassination, President Pervez Musharraf announced yesterday that Pakistan had invited Scotland Yard to help investigate the killing. In his first major address to the nation since Bhutto was slain Dec. 27, Musharraf also defended the decision to delay by six weeks parliamentary elections that were to have taken place next Tuesday. Rioting in the wake of Bhutto's death, he said, had left the security situation too precarious to proceed as scheduled.
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NEWS
By Laura King and Henry Chu and Laura King and Henry Chu,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 3, 2008
ISLAMABAD, Pakistan -- Pummeled by international and domestic skepticism over his government's version of Benazir Bhutto's assassination, President Pervez Musharraf announced yesterday that Pakistan had invited Scotland Yard to help investigate the killing. In his first major address to the nation since Bhutto was slain Dec. 27, Musharraf also defended the decision to delay by six weeks parliamentary elections that were to have taken place next Tuesday. Rioting in the wake of Bhutto's death, he said, had left the security situation too precarious to proceed as scheduled.
NEWS
By Sebastian Rotella and Ralph Frammolino and Sebastian Rotella and Ralph Frammolino,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 26, 2005
LONDON - Police disclosed the names of two fugitives yesterday who are wanted for allegedly trying to bomb a bus and a subway train last week. Authorities also stormed an apartment in a north London housing project where neighbors said they had frequently seen the two men. Scotland Yard's announcement indicated that police are making some progress as they race to prevent more attacks in a city on edge, but they appealed once again for the public's help...
NEWS
By Robert A. Erlandson and Robert A. Erlandson,SUN STAFF | September 3, 1997
Princess Diana would still be alive if she had allowed Scotland Yard to protect her, an international security consultant said yesterday."The accident was completely avoidable," said Robert L. Oatman, speaking from London. Oatman, whose main office is in Towson, arrived from Paris a day before the fatal high-speed crash in a Seine-side tunnel that killed Diana, 36; her companion, Dodi Al Fayed, 42; and chauffeur Henri Paul, 41, who French authorities say was drunk at the wheel.Although Diana used Scotland Yard's highly trained Royalty Protection Group when she was with her sons, Princes William, 15, and Harry, 12, she refused it in her private capacity in her determination to be independent from the royal family since her divorce from Prince Charles last year.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 8, 2000
LONDON - As an attempted heist, the plan was ingenious. Bust into the Millennium Dome aboard a stolen bulldozer, loot $500 million in diamonds, and make a clean getaway in a speed boat docked on the Thames River. There were only two teeny, tiny problems - the police were tipped off and the jewels were fakes. So went yesterday's gang-that-couldn't-shoot-straight bid to pull off the world's biggest robbery as police lay in wait, snuffed out the audacious plot and rounded up suspects, eventually arresting 12 people.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 13, 1996
LONDON -- In Britain's clubby modern art world, the talk this week isn't about sales but about crime.Scotland Yard is investigating a scheme in which art forgers allegedly tampered with archives at the Tate Gallery and other prestigious museums, allowing conspirators then to "authenticate" forged works that could command hundreds of thousands of dollars.Among the items under suspicion are works attributed to three 20th-century artists: the Swiss-born sculptor and painter Alberto Giacometti, English painter Ben Nicholson and the American-born sculptor Jacob Epstein.
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,London Bureau | May 9, 1992
LONDON -- Britain yesterday put its new chief of domestic intelligence, Stella Rimington, in charge of the fight against the Irish Republican Army.Not everyone was pleased: not Scotland Yard, not those who suspect the secret security agency is not trained for the job, not those who fear the move might mean a reduction of accountability by the security forces to the political authorities."
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,London Bureau of The Sun | February 20, 1991
LONDON -- Scotland Yard angrily rejected yesterday the Irish Republican Army's claims that police were to blame for the death and injuries in Monday's bomb explosion at Victoria Station because they failed to respond to a telephoned warning.Forty minutes before the explosion, a caller with an Irish accent told the London Transport Travel Center that bombs had been placed at all mainline stations.Police decided that the warning -- one of many received daily -- was too vague and too late to sound a public alarm.
NEWS
By Robert A. Erlandson and Robert A. Erlandson,Staff Writer | April 9, 1993
Scotland Yard has asked an English auctioneer to withdraw the revolver used to kill outlaw Jesse James from a planned April 28 sale at which it was expected to fetch at least $150,000.The .44-caliber Smith & Wesson, owned by the late Henry G. Lingenfelder of Towson, was stolen in 1968 from a museum in Missouri to which he had lent it for display.Det. Sgt. Tony Russell, of the Scotland Yard Art and Antiques Squad, said yesterday that he spoke with auctioneer Roy Butler, senior partner at Wallis & Wallis in Sussex, and will confer with him again early next week as the investigation proceeds.
NEWS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 15, 2005
LONDON -- Police in Scotland Yard released a photograph yesterday of a man with a large backpack walking through a suburban train station July 7, saying they believe it shows him carrying a bomb that he later detonated on one of London's double-decker buses. They urged witnesses to come forward and help with an investigation that appears to be on the trail of a possible mastermind for last week's deadly attacks. The photograph, captured by one of Britain's many closed-circuit security cameras, shows 18-year-old Hasib Hussain walking through a train station in Luton, a northern suburb of London, about 7:20 a.m. Police believe Hussain and three others took a train from Luton that morning to London's King's Cross station, and then dispersed through the city's transportation network and detonated their bombs.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 8, 2000
LONDON - As an attempted heist, the plan was ingenious. Bust into the Millennium Dome aboard a stolen bulldozer, loot $500 million in diamonds, and make a clean getaway in a speed boat docked on the Thames River. There were only two teeny, tiny problems - the police were tipped off and the jewels were fakes. So went yesterday's gang-that-couldn't-shoot-straight bid to pull off the world's biggest robbery as police lay in wait, snuffed out the audacious plot and rounded up suspects, eventually arresting 12 people.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 9, 1999
LONDON -- Neville Lawrence is surrounded by reminders of his son. The teen-ager's gaze stares from posters and photos. His name is uttered reverently in a new play. And his death nearly six years ago in a racially charged attack is poised to shake Britain to its foundations."I would have liked to have seen him alive and kicking now," Lawrence says softly. "I would have liked for him to be known for something else."The memory of Stephen Lawrence haunts a father and a country. His murder serves as a symbol of Britain's often-overlooked racial divisions.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | January 28, 1999
One thing I can promise about "Heat of the Sun" on public television tonight: You won't confuse this five-part series with any other mystery on the small screen this season. It is absolutely the jewel in the crown of PBS' "Mystery!" franchise this year.Cunningly crafted and wonderfully cast, it feels as if it must be based on a classic English novel or set of novels. But it isn't. "Heat of the Sun" was written for television.In it, we leave the English drawing room behind and head straight for "the bush" -- an on-location enterprise in Africa that ran so disastrously over budget, say the producers, that we are never going to see any episodes beyond the five starting tonight.
NEWS
By Robert A. Erlandson and Robert A. Erlandson,SUN STAFF | September 3, 1997
Princess Diana would still be alive if she had allowed Scotland Yard to protect her, an international security consultant said yesterday."The accident was completely avoidable," said Robert L. Oatman, speaking from London. Oatman, whose main office is in Towson, arrived from Paris a day before the fatal high-speed crash in a Seine-side tunnel that killed Diana, 36; her companion, Dodi Al Fayed, 42; and chauffeur Henri Paul, 41, who French authorities say was drunk at the wheel.Although Diana used Scotland Yard's highly trained Royalty Protection Group when she was with her sons, Princes William, 15, and Harry, 12, she refused it in her private capacity in her determination to be independent from the royal family since her divorce from Prince Charles last year.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 13, 1996
LONDON -- In Britain's clubby modern art world, the talk this week isn't about sales but about crime.Scotland Yard is investigating a scheme in which art forgers allegedly tampered with archives at the Tate Gallery and other prestigious museums, allowing conspirators then to "authenticate" forged works that could command hundreds of thousands of dollars.Among the items under suspicion are works attributed to three 20th-century artists: the Swiss-born sculptor and painter Alberto Giacometti, English painter Ben Nicholson and the American-born sculptor Jacob Epstein.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,London Bureau of The Sun | September 28, 1990
LONDON -- A bomb was discovered yesterday in the podium at an anti-terrorist conference in London that was to be addressed by a government minister and the country's top police commander.A small plastic lunch box packed with explosives was hidden under the top of the speaker's podium in a building in St. James, yards from where a terrorist bomb exploded in the Carlton Club in June.Shortly before the conference was to open, a television technician wiring a microphone to the lectern discovered the bomb.
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,London Bureau | April 29, 1993
LONDON -- Bob Ford's old gun, the one he shot Jesse James with, fetched more money yesterday than the famed outlaw probably ever made in a lifetime of robbing banks and trains, enough to make the old thief weep. Wallis & Wallis, of Lewes, Sussex, sold the .44 caliber Smith & Wesson revolver at auction for about $170,000."It's wonderful money!" said Roy Butler, senior partner at the auctioneers. "It beat the Annie Oakley gun. That went for 86,000 pounds [$124,000]" at auction at Christie's in London in late March.
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,London Bureau | June 18, 1993
LONDON -- A serial killer is at large in London, the town that gave the world the most infamous of that breed, Jack the Ripper.The killer, according to Scotland Yard, already has murdered five men, four of them known to be homosexuals. All the cases, said Detective Chief Superintendent Ken John, are "pathologically and forensically" linked.Three of the victims were strangled. Four were killed in their own homes, presumably by someone they had brought there.This is the second series of murders to hit London's gay community.
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,London Bureau | April 29, 1993
LONDON -- Bob Ford's old gun, the one he shot Jesse James with, fetched more money yesterday than the famed outlaw probably ever made in a lifetime of robbing banks and trains, enough to make the old thief weep. Wallis & Wallis, of Lewes, Sussex, sold the .44 caliber Smith & Wesson revolver at auction for about $170,000."It's wonderful money!" said Roy Butler, senior partner at the auctioneers. "It beat the Annie Oakley gun. That went for 86,000 pounds [$124,000]" at auction at Christie's in London in late March.
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